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New Media, Trust, PR

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  • 1. Web 2.0: Building Consumer Trust What should corporate communications do about the social media
  • 2. Web 2.0: Building Consumer Trust and Killing PR? What should corporate communications do about the social media
  • 3. The Platypus Case To many people, the platypus is a proof that God has a sense of humour
  • 4. The Platypus Case To many people, the platypus is a proof that God has a sense of humour To Russian bloggers, it is a second name for bad PR in the blogosphere
  • 5. The Platypus Case (continued) Decemb er 2008
  • 6. The Platypus Case (still continuing) • ‘Utkonos’ (platypus) has become the internet slang for poorly disguised advertising on the Russian blogs. • This ploy has brought the chain under scrutiny, and all of its drawbacks are cheerfully discussed on blogs (with its overall image being quite poor now).
  • 7. Where has it all gone wrong?
  • 8. What is Web 2.0 from a PR point of view?
  • 9. What essentially is Web 2.0? • Networking (vs. broadcasting) • Users (vs. publishers) • Collaboration & participation (vs. consumption)
  • 10. What does this mean for the media • Instant dissemination of information • Multiple angles to every story • 360° scrutiny on coverage • Real competition to conventional media
  • 11. Enter New Media
  • 12. How does the new media compare with the old? Conventional Media New Media • Big audiences • Segmented audiences • General topics • Narrow topics • ‘Industrial scale’ • Customised publishing publishing • Hobby • Professional
  • 13. How does the new media compare with the old? Conventional Media New Media • Big audiences • Segmented audiences • General topics • Narrow topics • ‘Industrial scale’ • Customised publishing Sells audiences publishing • Hobby to advertisers • Professional
  • 14. How does the new media compare with the old? Conventional Media New Media • Big audiences • Segmented audiences • General topics • Narrow topics • ‘Industrial scale’ • Exchanges Customised publishing Sells audiences publishing • Hobby content with to advertisers • Professional peers
  • 15. How does new media compete with the old? • Hardly any blog can really compete with any major traditional news outlet in the long run. • Not that it needs to… • Aggregation services and social bookmarking give everyone easy access to audiences bigger than one would expect
  • 16. How does new media compete with the old? • Hardly any blog can really compete with any major traditional news outlet in the long run. • Not that it needs to… • Aggregation services and social bookmarking give everyone easy access to audiences bigger than one would expect
  • 17. What about trust? We need to trust our sources of information to a certain degree Conventional Media New Media • Based on our knowledge of • Based on our emotional link procedures and practices in to the writer the media. • Inseparable from our trust Institutional • Separated from our trust for particular writer Personal Trust for personalities Trust • Centralised • Decentralised
  • 18. What about trust? We need to trust our sources of information to a certain degree Conventional Media New Media • Based on our knowledge of • Based on our emotional link procedures and practices in to the writer the media. • Inseparable from our trust • Separated from our trust for particular writer Personal Trust for personalities • Decentralised • Centralised
  • 19. What about trust? We need to trust our sources of information to a certain degree Conventional Media New Media • Based on our knowledge of • Based on our emotional link procedures and practices in to the writer the media. • Inseparable from our trust • Separated from our trust for for personalities particular writer • Decentralised • Centralised
  • 20. Trust 2.0 • End of authority, expertise and certification • Availability and exposure to peer opinion • Small world networks are becoming ‘big’ • Availability of alternative sources and background info
  • 21. Trust 2.0 • End of authority, expertise and certification • Availability and exposure to peer opinion • Small world networks are becoming ‘big’ • Availability of alternative sources and background info
  • 22. Social Media & Trust • Utilises existing ties • Builds new links • Facilitates exchange • Creates new knowledge • Makes access to information easy and efficient
  • 23. Social Media & Trust • Utilises existing ties • Builds new links • Facilitates exchange • Creates new knowledge • Makes access to information easy and efficient Web 2.0 and & the social media generate trust
  • 24. How does Trust 2.0 work?
  • 25. How does Trust 2.0 work? Shared media, Hosted media
  • 26. How does Trust 2.0 work? Shared media, Hosted media Joint projects carried out by online communities (Wikipedia)
  • 27. How does Trust 2.0 work? Communities & Social Networks that plan ‘offline’ activities Shared media, (charity) Hosted media Joint projects carried out by online communities (Wikipedia)
  • 28. What about trust? Trust 1.0 Trust 2.0 Advertising, product PR, marketing communications
  • 29. What about trust? Trust 1.0 Trust 2.0 Advertising, product PR, marketing communications
  • 30. What about trust? Trust 1.0 Trust 2.0 Advertising, product PR, marketing communications
  • 31. Dante’s Inferno • Dante’s Inferno distinguishes between the two types of trust when punishing the fraudulent ones. • So do social media: hidden advertising may be a part of the media, but not of peer-to-peer relations
  • 32. So what was wrong with Platypus? An old-fashioned attempt to ‘exploit’ personal trust in the way you would use the institutional one
  • 33. Old-school PR • No trust involved • Authority assumed • Audience is passive • No feedback expected
  • 34. Old-school PR • No trust involved • Authority assumed • Audience is passive • No feedback expected Leading the blind
  • 35. Why is new media ‘dangerous’ for PR?
  • 36. The End of Spin • PR used to rely on a scarcity of channels and an ability to impose its own ‘spin’ through these channels. • With channels multiplying, our ability to impose spin becomes pretty limited.
  • 37. The End of Spin • PR used to rely on a scarcity of channels and an ability to impose its own ‘spin’ through these channels. • With channels multiplying, our ability to impose spin becomes pretty limited.
  • 38. • Public Relations have virtually turned into Media Relations, since the media used to be the most obvious and cost-effective way to reach your audiences. • It no longer is… • PR has to adapt and meet ‘the public’ Press-relations Events Social Media Relations
  • 39. • Public Relations have virtually turned into Media Relations, since the media used to be the most obvious and cost-effective way to reach your audiences. • It no longer is… • PR has to adapt and meet ‘the public’ Press-relations Events Social Media Relations
  • 40. What can be done?
  • 41. Web 2.0 ‘Merits’ • Create • Quote • Share • Link back • Connect • Comment • Collaborate • Participate
  • 42. Web 2.0 ‘Merits’ • Create • Quote • Share • Link back • Connect • Comment • Collaborate • Participate What can we do with them?
  • 43. Public Relations 2.0 • Engage audience • Build communities • Expect and inspire feedback
  • 44. Public Relations 2.0 • Engage audience • Build communities • Expect and inspire feedback Deal with people, not with the media
  • 45. Social Media Rules
  • 46. Social Media Rules • Nothing is boring
  • 47. Social Media Rules • Nothing is boring • Nobody is unimportant
  • 48. Social Media Rules • Nothing is boring • Nobody is unimportant • Go after your audience
  • 49. Social Media Rules • Nothing is boring • Nobody is unimportant • Go after your audience • Give them content
  • 50. Social Media Rules • Nothing is boring • Nobody is unimportant • Go after your audience • Give them content • Give them voice
  • 51. Social Media Rules • Nothing is boring • Nobody is unimportant • Go after your audience • Give them content • Give them voice • Listen to them
  • 52. In other words • You can always find an interested audience • You never know what will be BIG tomorrow • Public services can be better than your website • Make sure you participate • Make sure you interact, not broadcast • Learn from your audience
  • 53. Bring Wispa back • Chocolate bars that are no longer on sale are not a story • Even a new chocolate bar is not a story BUT • Every newspaper wrote about re-launch od Wispa after thousands of people demanded Wispa back in blogs and social networks
  • 54. ZaZhelezo [‘about hardware’] • Data-centres are boring • The media does not cover every step of a project • IT people don’t trust advertising BUT • A community blog about the launch of Troyka- Dialog’s new data-centre has become one of the most successful blogging PR projects.
  • 55. Press Club • Journalists don’t trust PR people • Journalists like to keep their blogs private BUT • The Telecom Press community, built by Beeline, has become the biggest media-club in the industry.
  • 56. So is Web 2.0 the death of PR?
  • 57. Yes, if you don’t change
  • 58. No, if you really ‘ride’ the wave
  • 59. But be careful what you ride
  • 60. Thank you! arseniy.rastorguev@mmdcee.com www.mmdcee.com www.mmdblog.com