Collective BargainingVancouver & District Labour Council       Warmly Welcomes Chinese Trade Union Delegation
1927 Shanghai; 1935 Vancouver
1967
2004, Calgary
2005, Guangzhou
2005, Dalian
2005, Toronto
Purpose of trade unions Organize workers collectively to represent the interests of workers and the working class We organ...
International Working ClassSolidarity The VDLC believes that the interests of workers and capitalists everywhere are compl...
We believe in internationalworking class solidarity
MNCs seek to divide usMultinational corporations (MNCs) profitenormously by seeking the cheapest sourceof labour within th...
FriendshipVDLC andBeijing Municipal Federation of TradeUnions
The response to the MNCagenda of globalization isinternational working classsolidary We must support workers anywhere in t...
Labour movement today
Today, hotel workers protest
Work in BC Today Resource industries are less important and the service industry such as health care, education and touris...
Service industry hard toorganize
Unionization Rate Today 30% of all workers in Canada are in unions In practice, almost all large workplaces have unions an...
Secret ballot vote held bygovernment
Organizing unions is still veryhard  Although it is illegal for employers to  threaten workers who want to join a union,  ...
Employers frighten andintimidate workers
Today, unions recognized in law Employers must recognize the union when a majority of workers vote in a government-run sec...
Collective Agreement
But getting the first collectiveagreement is very hard It is illegal for employers to refuse to bargain in good faith But ...
Public sector workers
Today, most collectiveagreements have the Randformula Because the union is legally obliged to represent all workers, regar...
Private sector workers
Labour Law Context Adversarial premise Most workers covered by provincial labour codes 10% of workers are under federal la...
Less racism than in the past
Today, there is much lessracism than in the past All Canadians, including new immigrants have fundamental rights Unions ac...
Women workers
Today for women workersthings are much better It is illegal to treat women and men differently on the job Women have the s...
Vacation time will get us up a closemountain, but what about the GreatWall? Our vacations are too short.
Minimum wage laws today Today, minimum wage laws, while they cover almost all workers, are grossly inadequate to protect w...
Public pensions are inadequate
Public insurance systems Canada Pension Plan, inadequate to avoid poverty in retirement Medicare (includes all hospital st...
Unemploymentline
Today, the plan is calledEmployment Insurance, not UI All workers must pay into the fund as must all employers But in prac...
Voting in elections
Labour and socialist politicstoday Today, most unions are affiliated to the New Democratic Party (NDP), the political part...
Today, 70% of workers inunions are in Canadian unions
Most workers now inCanadian Unions In 1970, only 30% of workers who were members of unions in Canada were members of Canad...
Canadian Labour Congress• Represents more than 3 million  workers who are represented by  dozens of unions, both Canadian ...
BC Federation of Labour• Represents more than 500,000 workers  who are represented by more than 50,  both Canadian and Ame...
VDLC covers Greater Vancouver area
Vancouver & District LabourCouncil Founded in 1889 Second largest labour council in Canada Represents 65,000 workers in 11...
Labour movement today
Today, hotel workers protest
Work in BC Today Resource industries are less important and the service industry such as health care, education and touris...
Service industry hard toorganize
Unionization Rate Today 30% of all workers in Canada are in unions In practice, almost all large workplaces have unions an...
Secret ballot vote held bygovernment
Organizing unions is still very hard  Although it is illegal for employers to threaten  workers who want to join a union, ...
Employers frighten andintimidate workers
Today, unions recognized in law Employers must recognize the union when a majority of workers vote in a government-run sec...
Collective Agreement
But getting the first collectiveagreement is very hard It is illegal for employers to refuse to bargain in good faith But ...
Public sector workers
Today, most collectiveagreements have the Randformula Because the union is legally obliged to represent all workers, regar...
Private sector workers
Labour Law Context Adversarial premise Most workers covered by provincial labour codes 10% of workers are under federal la...
Less racism than in the past
Today, there is much lessracism than in the past All Canadians, including new immigrants have fundamental rights Unions ac...
Women workers
Today for women workersthings are much better It is illegal to treat women and men differently on the job Women have the s...
Vacation time will get us up a closemountain, but what about the GreatWall? Our vacations are too short.
Minimum wage laws today Today, minimum wage laws, while they cover almost all workers, are grossly inadequate to protect w...
Public pensions are inadequate
Public insurance systems Canada Pension Plan, inadequate to avoid poverty in retirement Medicare (includes all hospital st...
Unemploymentline
Today, the plan is calledEmployment Insurance, not UI All workers must pay into the fund as must all employers But in prac...
Voting in elections
Labour and socialist politicstoday Today, most unions are affiliated to the New Democratic Party (NDP), the political part...
Today, 70% of workers inunions are in Canadian unions
Most workers now inCanadian Unions In 1970, only 30% of workers who were members of unions in Canada were members of Canad...
Canadian Labour Congress• Represents more than 3 million workers  who are represented by dozens of  unions, both Canadian ...
BC Federation of Labour• Represents more than 500,000 workers  who are represented by more than 50,  both Canadian and Ame...
VDLC covers Greater Vancouver area
Vancouver & District LabourCouncil Founded in 1889 Second largest labour council in Canada Represents 65,000 workers in 11...
When and how to begin   preparing for negotiationsMembership MeetingsBargaining Unit QuestionnairesSteering CommitteesStra...
Understanding the true needs      of the other partyOpening day of negotiationsIdentifying Key IssuesResponding to demands...
How to assess the strength of  your position at bargainingBacking up your positionsCredibility of the BargainingCommitteeG...
How to protect your rights during  the contract term and avoid     problems at the tableNote-takingSign off sheetsExplorin...
How to identify critical issues for       your negotiationsCommunicationsDetermining strike issues
What goals you should      consider settingTimingThe number of issues for theproposalLanguage issuesPattern bargainingLeng...
Alternatives for NegotiationsMediationBinding ArbitrationLabour’s response to LegislationCreating a respectful workingrela...
The interests of workers and bosses are not the same.
Viva Magnetic        CAWCollective Agreement
1. IntroductionPurpose, to promote harmoniousrelationsProtect the unionProtect the worker – no contractingout
2. Management RightsThey have them all unless we erodethem
3. Union RecognitionCompany recognizes union asrepresenting all workersAll workers must join union and pay duesCompany mus...
4. Communications CommitteeSo union can find out what’s going on
5. DisciplineCompany can only discipline(warnings, suspensions or firing) forjust and reasonable causeUnion can put in gri...
6. Grievance ProcedureSeveral formal stagesUnion meets at low level withmanagementProceed to higher levels ofmanagementGri...
7. ArbitrationThird party chosen by union andcompanyFormal hearing, decides the caseCompany must follow arbitrator’sdecision
8. Occupational Health and SafetyOHS CommitteeInjured worker proceduresFirst aid attendantsPrevent cancer campaignWorkplac...
9. Human Rights and Harassment No discrimination eg. on basis of sex, religion, race, etc. No harassment
10. Hours of WorkNormal hoursLunch periods and rest periodsRequire 8 hour break between shiftsShift assignments
11. OvertimeOvertime pay: after 8: 1.5X; after 11:2XAll overtime is voluntaryCall out payReporting pay
12. VacationsVacation entitlement and pay:  After 1 year, 2 weeks off and 4% pay  After 5 years, 3 weeks off and 6% pay
13. Statutory Holidays10 days per yearMust have time off and must be paid
14. BenefitsCompany pays for all medicalinsurance.Includes BC medical plan,prescription drugs and dental planLife insurance
15. Sick LeaveWorkers receive unpaid leave ofabsence
16. Leaves of AbsenceFamily leave  Bereavement leave, up to 3 paid days  Emergency family leave, up to 5 paid daysJury dut...
17. SeniorityThe longer workers are employed, themore rights they haveSeniority lists given to union and postedProbation p...
18. PromotionsPromotions based on skill, ability,qualifications and seniority
19. Adjustment PlanIf company wants to close the plant orhave a major lay-off, the union mustbe consulted and terms must b...
20. WagesWorkers doing the same type of jobare paid the same rate of pay. Thereare only four types of jobs.No production b...
21. Duration3 year agreementNo strikes or lockouts during the 3 yearsCollective agreement continues whilecompany and union...
Friendship
Thank you,Have a safe journey
English.collective bargaining generic longer.vdlc
English.collective bargaining generic longer.vdlc
English.collective bargaining generic longer.vdlc
English.collective bargaining generic longer.vdlc
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

English.collective bargaining generic longer.vdlc

379
-1

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
379
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
5
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

English.collective bargaining generic longer.vdlc

  1. 1. Collective BargainingVancouver & District Labour Council Warmly Welcomes Chinese Trade Union Delegation
  2. 2. 1927 Shanghai; 1935 Vancouver
  3. 3. 1967
  4. 4. 2004, Calgary
  5. 5. 2005, Guangzhou
  6. 6. 2005, Dalian
  7. 7. 2005, Toronto
  8. 8. Purpose of trade unions Organize workers collectively to represent the interests of workers and the working class We organize in the workplace, in the community and throughout the province For better treatment for workers and the working class by employers and the government
  9. 9. International Working ClassSolidarity The VDLC believes that the interests of workers and capitalists everywhere are completely opposite. We believe very strongly that the interests of workers around the world are the same. This is even more true in the context of the corporate agenda of globalization that seeks to pit workers in different countries against each
  10. 10. We believe in internationalworking class solidarity
  11. 11. MNCs seek to divide usMultinational corporations (MNCs) profitenormously by seeking the cheapest sourceof labour within their home countries,threatening workers with job loss if theydon’t capitulate to demands for cuts towages and conditions.The MNCs move to other countries seekingever cheaper sources of labour andincrease their profits enormously by doingso.It is in the interests of all workers of the
  12. 12. FriendshipVDLC andBeijing Municipal Federation of TradeUnions
  13. 13. The response to the MNCagenda of globalization isinternational working classsolidary We must support workers anywhere in the world where they are struggling for justice and a better life. To do this, we must get to know each other, to learn more about our common issues and common struggles.
  14. 14. Labour movement today
  15. 15. Today, hotel workers protest
  16. 16. Work in BC Today Resource industries are less important and the service industry such as health care, education and tourism are much more important Throughout the country, work is much more precarious with far fewer workers having a 40 hour work week. Workers jobs are much less secure than they used to be.
  17. 17. Service industry hard toorganize
  18. 18. Unionization Rate Today 30% of all workers in Canada are in unions In practice, almost all large workplaces have unions and there, all workers are members of unions. But it also means almost all small workplaces have no unions. It is much easier for employers to threaten workers with firing, lay-offs or workplace closure in small
  19. 19. Secret ballot vote held bygovernment
  20. 20. Organizing unions is still veryhard Although it is illegal for employers to threaten workers who want to join a union, in practice it is common and sometimes workers are fired We organize workers in secret so the employer does not find out who has signed up When we sign up a majority of workers, we apply to the Labour Relations Board for a vote The LRB runs the secret ballot vote and if
  21. 21. Employers frighten andintimidate workers
  22. 22. Today, unions recognized in law Employers must recognize the union when a majority of workers vote in a government-run secret ballot vote to join the union But in practice, employers do everything possible to discourage workers from joining unions, especially scaring workers by threatening firings, lay-offs or workplace closures.
  23. 23. Collective Agreement
  24. 24. But getting the first collectiveagreement is very hard It is illegal for employers to refuse to bargain in good faith But in practice they often threaten to close the workplace or lay off workers if the union gets a first collective agreement Sometimes workers get so scared they stop supporting the union But usually they continue to support us and we get a first agreement.
  25. 25. Public sector workers
  26. 26. Today, most collectiveagreements have the Randformula Because the union is legally obliged to represent all workers, regardless of whether they are members Those workers that share in the benefits established by the union should also shoulder part of the burden, the maintenance of the union by paying union dues Analogy: duty to pay taxes, in exchange government provides services to all Closed shops: In public sector, workers
  27. 27. Private sector workers
  28. 28. Labour Law Context Adversarial premise Most workers covered by provincial labour codes 10% of workers are under federal law, covering national workers, e.g. postal, transportation and communications Labour laws governing unions are supplemented by other laws & programs (workers’ compensation, EI, CPP, Human Rights, etc.) Right to strike (or lock out) only when no collective agreement in effect Generally agreements continue to apply until replaced by new terms / renewed Essential services laws prevent some kinds of workers from withdrawing services - expanding list of coverage, once "life & limb" now covers much broader scope Only some provinces do not permit use of scabs in a strike
  29. 29. Less racism than in the past
  30. 30. Today, there is much lessracism than in the past All Canadians, including new immigrants have fundamental rights Unions actively oppose racism and actively promote the involvement of people of colour and new immigrants in the union, e.g. running English as a Second Language courses There are still some racist attitudes among some people in our society but it is illegal and is actively
  31. 31. Women workers
  32. 32. Today for women workersthings are much better It is illegal to treat women and men differently on the job Women have the same rights to be hired and for promotion as men They have the same rights to pay for work of equal value and for pensions They also have maternity and parental leave rights There is still some discrimination against women in attitudes but much less than before But the reality is still that women, because of the types of jobs they hold that are undervalued, are paid 30% less than men.
  33. 33. Vacation time will get us up a closemountain, but what about the GreatWall? Our vacations are too short.
  34. 34. Minimum wage laws today Today, minimum wage laws, while they cover almost all workers, are grossly inadequate to protect workers from poverty. Our two weeks vacation entitlement in law and our 10 day holiday paid leave are far behind European laws.
  35. 35. Public pensions are inadequate
  36. 36. Public insurance systems Canada Pension Plan, inadequate to avoid poverty in retirement Medicare (includes all hospital stays and doctors visits; excludes dental, vision, medicine outside hospital) Employment Insurance (includes maternity and sickness) Workers’ Compensation, most workers qualify but many do not, especially for occupational diseases
  37. 37. Unemploymentline
  38. 38. Today, the plan is calledEmployment Insurance, not UI All workers must pay into the fund as must all employers But in practice, many workers do not qualify for benefits because they have not worked enough hours in the year, or they run out of benefits before they have found work. More than 50% of Canadian workers who are unemployed are not receiving benefits.
  39. 39. Voting in elections
  40. 40. Labour and socialist politicstoday Today, most unions are affiliated to the New Democratic Party (NDP), the political party which grew out of the CCF. Its ideology remains social democratic. In Quebec, most unions are affiliated to the Bloc Quebecois, which is also a social democratic party. Trade union members are free to vote for who they want in government
  41. 41. Today, 70% of workers inunions are in Canadian unions
  42. 42. Most workers now inCanadian Unions In 1970, only 30% of workers who were members of unions in Canada were members of Canadian unions. The rest were members of American- based unions. Today, 70% of all workers who are members of unions in Canada, are members of Canadian unions. The rest are members of American-based unions.
  43. 43. Canadian Labour Congress• Represents more than 3 million workers who are represented by dozens of unions, both Canadian and American-based, provincial federations of labour and regional labour councils• Four full time officers, elected at convention held every 3 years, more than 1,000 delegates• Head office in Ottawa and regional offices throughout the country with
  44. 44. BC Federation of Labour• Represents more than 500,000 workers who are represented by more than 50, both Canadian and American-based, in about 800 local unions• Two officers elected at convention of more than 1,000 delegates, held every two years• 20 executive officers from the largest unions meet once a month• 10 full time staff work at the
  45. 45. VDLC covers Greater Vancouver area
  46. 46. Vancouver & District LabourCouncil Founded in 1889 Second largest labour council in Canada Represents 65,000 workers in 118 local unions Executive of 5 elected officers (President is full time) plus 12 members representing various unions
  47. 47. Labour movement today
  48. 48. Today, hotel workers protest
  49. 49. Work in BC Today Resource industries are less important and the service industry such as health care, education and tourism are much more important Throughout the country, work is much more precarious with far fewer workers having a 40 hour work week. Workers jobs are much less secure than they used to be.
  50. 50. Service industry hard toorganize
  51. 51. Unionization Rate Today 30% of all workers in Canada are in unions In practice, almost all large workplaces have unions and there, all workers are members of unions. But it also means almost all small workplaces have no unions. It is much easier for employers to threaten workers with firing, lay-offs or workplace closure in small workplaces.
  52. 52. Secret ballot vote held bygovernment
  53. 53. Organizing unions is still very hard Although it is illegal for employers to threaten workers who want to join a union, in practice it is common and sometimes workers are fired We organize workers in secret so the employer does not find out who has signed up When we sign up a majority of workers, we apply to the Labour Relations Board for a vote The LRB runs the secret ballot vote and if a majority of workers vote in favour, the union is certified by the government to represent all of the workers in the workplace.
  54. 54. Employers frighten andintimidate workers
  55. 55. Today, unions recognized in law Employers must recognize the union when a majority of workers vote in a government-run secret ballot vote to join the union But in practice, employers do everything possible to discourage workers from joining unions, especially scaring workers by threatening firings, lay-offs or workplace closures.
  56. 56. Collective Agreement
  57. 57. But getting the first collectiveagreement is very hard It is illegal for employers to refuse to bargain in good faith But in practice they often threaten to close the workplace or lay off workers if the union gets a first collective agreement Sometimes workers get so scared they stop supporting the union But usually they continue to support us and we get a first agreement.
  58. 58. Public sector workers
  59. 59. Today, most collectiveagreements have the Randformula Because the union is legally obliged to represent all workers, regardless of whether they are members Those workers that share in the benefits established by the union should also shoulder part of the burden, the maintenance of the union by paying union dues Analogy: duty to pay taxes, in exchange government provides services to all Closed shops: In public sector, workers must join the union but in the private sector, not all agreements require membership, just dues.
  60. 60. Private sector workers
  61. 61. Labour Law Context Adversarial premise Most workers covered by provincial labour codes 10% of workers are under federal law, covering national workers, e.g. postal, transportation and communications Labour laws governing unions are supplemented by other laws & programs (workers’ compensation, EI, CPP, Human Rights, etc.) Right to strike (or lock out) only when no collective agreement in effect Generally agreements continue to apply until replaced by new terms / renewed Essential services laws prevent some kinds of workers from withdrawing services - expanding list of coverage, once "life & limb" now covers much broader scope Only some provinces do not permit use of scabs in a strike or lock out
  62. 62. Less racism than in the past
  63. 63. Today, there is much lessracism than in the past All Canadians, including new immigrants have fundamental rights Unions actively oppose racism and actively promote the involvement of people of colour and new immigrants in the union, e.g. running English as a Second Language courses There are still some racist attitudes among some people in our society but it is illegal and is actively
  64. 64. Women workers
  65. 65. Today for women workersthings are much better It is illegal to treat women and men differently on the job Women have the same rights to be hired and for promotion as men They have the same rights to pay for work of equal value and for pensions They also have maternity and parental leave rights There is still some discrimination against women in attitudes but much less than before But the reality is still that women, because of the types of jobs they hold that are undervalued, are paid 30% less than men.
  66. 66. Vacation time will get us up a closemountain, but what about the GreatWall? Our vacations are too short.
  67. 67. Minimum wage laws today Today, minimum wage laws, while they cover almost all workers, are grossly inadequate to protect workers from poverty. Our two weeks vacation entitlement in law and our 10 day holiday paid leave are far behind European laws.
  68. 68. Public pensions are inadequate
  69. 69. Public insurance systems Canada Pension Plan, inadequate to avoid poverty in retirement Medicare (includes all hospital stays and doctors visits; excludes dental, vision, medicine outside hospital) Employment Insurance (includes maternity and sickness) Workers’ Compensation, most workers qualify but many do not, especially for occupational diseases
  70. 70. Unemploymentline
  71. 71. Today, the plan is calledEmployment Insurance, not UI All workers must pay into the fund as must all employers But in practice, many workers do not qualify for benefits because they have not worked enough hours in the year, or they run out of benefits before they have found work. More than 50% of Canadian workers who are unemployed are not receiving benefits.
  72. 72. Voting in elections
  73. 73. Labour and socialist politicstoday Today, most unions are affiliated to the New Democratic Party (NDP), the political party which grew out of the CCF. Its ideology remains social democratic. In Quebec, most unions are affiliated to the Bloc Quebecois, which is also a social democratic party. Trade union members are free to vote for who they want in government elections. Most, but far from all, support social democratic parties.
  74. 74. Today, 70% of workers inunions are in Canadian unions
  75. 75. Most workers now inCanadian Unions In 1970, only 30% of workers who were members of unions in Canada were members of Canadian unions. The rest were members of American- based unions. Today, 70% of all workers who are members of unions in Canada, are members of Canadian unions. The rest are members of American-based unions.
  76. 76. Canadian Labour Congress• Represents more than 3 million workers who are represented by dozens of unions, both Canadian and American- based, provincial federations of labour and regional labour councils• Four full time officers, elected at convention held every 3 years, more than 1,000 delegates• Head office in Ottawa and regional offices throughout the country with staff
  77. 77. BC Federation of Labour• Represents more than 500,000 workers who are represented by more than 50, both Canadian and American-based, in about 800 local unions• Two officers elected at convention of more than 1,000 delegates, held every two years• 20 executive officers from the largest unions meet once a month• 10 full time staff work at the headquarters in Vancouver
  78. 78. VDLC covers Greater Vancouver area
  79. 79. Vancouver & District LabourCouncil Founded in 1889 Second largest labour council in Canada Represents 65,000 workers in 118 local unions Executive of 5 elected officers (President is full time) plus 12 members representing various unions
  80. 80. When and how to begin preparing for negotiationsMembership MeetingsBargaining Unit QuestionnairesSteering CommitteesStrategy MeetingsRatification of ProposalsFirst Collective Agreements
  81. 81. Understanding the true needs of the other partyOpening day of negotiationsIdentifying Key IssuesResponding to demands for concessionsThe importance of bargaining Job SecuritySeniority rightsPensions and BenefitsCredibility and trustUsing Liaison Committees effectively
  82. 82. How to assess the strength of your position at bargainingBacking up your positionsCredibility of the BargainingCommitteeGauging the strength of a Strike VoteCommunicationsResearching trendsMeasuring progress
  83. 83. How to protect your rights during the contract term and avoid problems at the tableNote-takingSign off sheetsExploring a tentative deal
  84. 84. How to identify critical issues for your negotiationsCommunicationsDetermining strike issues
  85. 85. What goals you should consider settingTimingThe number of issues for theproposalLanguage issuesPattern bargainingLength of Collective Agreements
  86. 86. Alternatives for NegotiationsMediationBinding ArbitrationLabour’s response to LegislationCreating a respectful workingrelationship
  87. 87. The interests of workers and bosses are not the same.
  88. 88. Viva Magnetic CAWCollective Agreement
  89. 89. 1. IntroductionPurpose, to promote harmoniousrelationsProtect the unionProtect the worker – no contractingout
  90. 90. 2. Management RightsThey have them all unless we erodethem
  91. 91. 3. Union RecognitionCompany recognizes union asrepresenting all workersAll workers must join union and pay duesCompany must recognize shop stewards inworkplace and allow outside union repsaccessCompany must allow union bulletin boardsCompany must allow union reps leave fromworkplace
  92. 92. 4. Communications CommitteeSo union can find out what’s going on
  93. 93. 5. DisciplineCompany can only discipline(warnings, suspensions or firing) forjust and reasonable causeUnion can put in grievance on behalfof worker if he or she feels disciplineis unjust
  94. 94. 6. Grievance ProcedureSeveral formal stagesUnion meets at low level withmanagementProceed to higher levels ofmanagementGrievor is present throughoutTime limits so company can’t stall
  95. 95. 7. ArbitrationThird party chosen by union andcompanyFormal hearing, decides the caseCompany must follow arbitrator’sdecision
  96. 96. 8. Occupational Health and SafetyOHS CommitteeInjured worker proceduresFirst aid attendantsPrevent cancer campaignWorkplace conditionsWorkers have right to refuse unsafe workCompany must provide personal protectiveequipment
  97. 97. 9. Human Rights and Harassment No discrimination eg. on basis of sex, religion, race, etc. No harassment
  98. 98. 10. Hours of WorkNormal hoursLunch periods and rest periodsRequire 8 hour break between shiftsShift assignments
  99. 99. 11. OvertimeOvertime pay: after 8: 1.5X; after 11:2XAll overtime is voluntaryCall out payReporting pay
  100. 100. 12. VacationsVacation entitlement and pay: After 1 year, 2 weeks off and 4% pay After 5 years, 3 weeks off and 6% pay
  101. 101. 13. Statutory Holidays10 days per yearMust have time off and must be paid
  102. 102. 14. BenefitsCompany pays for all medicalinsurance.Includes BC medical plan,prescription drugs and dental planLife insurance
  103. 103. 15. Sick LeaveWorkers receive unpaid leave ofabsence
  104. 104. 16. Leaves of AbsenceFamily leave Bereavement leave, up to 3 paid days Emergency family leave, up to 5 paid daysJury dutyParental leave Company must grant leave Benefits through Employment Insurance Commission (federal government, workers and companies pay into this insurance fund)
  105. 105. 17. SeniorityThe longer workers are employed, themore rights they haveSeniority lists given to union and postedProbation period for new workers, 3monthsLast hired are first laid offLast laid off are first recalled after lay offLose seniority (right to be called back towork) if off more than 6-9 monthsEntitled to severance pay (a week peryear’s service)
  106. 106. 18. PromotionsPromotions based on skill, ability,qualifications and seniority
  107. 107. 19. Adjustment PlanIf company wants to close the plant orhave a major lay-off, the union mustbe consulted and terms must benegotiated
  108. 108. 20. WagesWorkers doing the same type of jobare paid the same rate of pay. Thereare only four types of jobs.No production bonusesExtra pay for working afternoon shiftor night shift
  109. 109. 21. Duration3 year agreementNo strikes or lockouts during the 3 yearsCollective agreement continues whilecompany and union bargain a new oneNew collective agreement is based on theold oneIf negotiations break down, then there canbe a strike or lockout
  110. 110. Friendship
  111. 111. Thank you,Have a safe journey
  1. A particular slide catching your eye?

    Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

×