Education System In The United Kingdom

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Primary Education in United Kingdom

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Education System In The United Kingdom

  1. 1. Education System in the United Kingdom Nursery and Primary School
  2. 2. Education in the UK <ul><li>Education in the UK is what is called a “devolved matter”. </li></ul><ul><li>The systems in each government are similar in England, Wales and Northern Ireland, with the Scottish system being completely separate. </li></ul><ul><li>There are differences in the curriculum, exams and final qualifications. </li></ul>
  3. 3. Education in Northern Ireland <ul><li>The Department of Education is responsible for Northern Ireland’s education system, except higher and further education – Department for Employment and Learning. </li></ul><ul><li>Department of Education covers pre-school (nursery school), primary, post-primary and special education. </li></ul><ul><li>Also, community relations, teacher training and salaries. </li></ul>
  4. 4. Library Boards <ul><li>A library board covers different geographical areas. </li></ul><ul><li>There are five of these – Belfast Education and Library Board (BELB), North Eastern (NEELB), South Eastern (SEELB), Southern (SELB) and Western (WELB) </li></ul><ul><li>They have administered a nationwide computer system called C2K where all teachers and students in the province can access the internet and tools. </li></ul>
  5. 5. Nursery School (Northern Ireland) <ul><li>Nursery school is for young children to attend between the ages of 0 – 4. </li></ul><ul><li>There is no uniform or any lessons, it is simply a place for fun. </li></ul><ul><li>Nursery schools cost a lot of money and as they usually finish at around 2 o’clock, parents usually have to find a babysitter to collect the children at this time. </li></ul>
  6. 6. Primary School <ul><li>Primary school children start at age 4 and continue this for 7 years. </li></ul><ul><li>The age of the child on the 1 st July determines which year they should enter the system. (In England and Wales it is 1 st September) </li></ul><ul><li>The different groups are sorted by age and are called Primary 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 or 7. </li></ul><ul><li>In Primary 1 and 2, children are taught spellings and basic maths e.g. 4+4 = 8. </li></ul><ul><li>In certain days children are also allowed ‘break times’ where they can play with different toys in the classroom. </li></ul><ul><li>This helps focus attention for the rest of the day. </li></ul><ul><li>Children in Primary 1 and 2 are in a separate playground to older children and leave the school at 2pm. </li></ul>
  7. 7. Rules in Primary School <ul><li>All children must wear a uniform. </li></ul><ul><li>Certain games are banned from playing in the playground e.g. British bulldog. </li></ul><ul><li>Electronics are not allowed in schools. </li></ul><ul><li>If children are given a mobile phone for safety, it must be left with a teacher. </li></ul><ul><li>All children must attend assembly everyday. This is where hymns are sung and prayers are said and any announcements are made. </li></ul>
  8. 8. Primary 1 & 2 <ul><li>In Primary 1 and 2, children are taught spellings and basic maths e.g. 4+4 = 8. </li></ul><ul><li>In certain days children are also allowed ‘break times’ where they can play with different toys in the classroom. </li></ul><ul><li>This helps focus attention for the rest of the day. </li></ul><ul><li>Children in Primary 1 and 2 are in a separate playground to older children (in some schools) and leave the school at 2pm. </li></ul>
  9. 9. Primary 3 and 4 <ul><li>Children in Primary 3 and 4 are called ‘Key Stage 1’. </li></ul><ul><li>In Primary 3, children are usually taught grammar and more advanced spellings than in primary one and two. They are no longer allowed play time and must stay until 3 in the afternoon. </li></ul><ul><li>They are prepared for their Key Stage 1 throughout these two years and </li></ul><ul><li>In Primary 4, children are taught multiplication and basic division. They are then asked to take their Key Stage 1 exam. This assesses basic spelling and maths. </li></ul>
  10. 10. Key Stage 1
  11. 11. Primary 5 & 6 <ul><li>Primary 5 starts to teach children more about history, geography and science. </li></ul><ul><li>For example in P5, I studied about the Egyptians, Hurricanes and about the world. </li></ul><ul><li>This is the start of Key Stage 2, and at the start of primary 7 children will sit this exam. </li></ul><ul><li>In Primary 6, I learnt about the Vikings and there was a school trip to London. </li></ul>
  12. 12. Primary 7 <ul><li>Primary 7 is a big year for children in Northern Ireland, however in recent years things have changed. </li></ul><ul><li>There is an exam called the 11+ which is designed for most children to sit when they are 11 or older, however most sit it when they are 10. </li></ul><ul><li>It features two exams both sat in early November and each two weeks apart. This judges children on the three main areas needed for their progression into secondary school – English, Maths and Science. </li></ul>
  13. 13. The 11+ <ul><li>For different secondary schools there are different grades allowed into the certain schools. </li></ul><ul><li>Pupils are graded A to D and some schools will only accept A grades. However the grades are listed as – A (top 25% of the country), B1 (5%), B2 (5%), C1(5%), C2(5%), or D (55%). </li></ul><ul><li>It assesses a child’s ability to solve problems using verbal reasoning, mathematics, writing and non-verbal reasoning. </li></ul><ul><li>It is based on the idea that different skills required different schooling. </li></ul><ul><li>In some schools, it became voluntary for children of lower levels or who could carry on into an integrated school. </li></ul><ul><li>The last transfer test was sat in Northern Ireland in November 2008 after Caitríona Ruane scrapped it. </li></ul>
  14. 14. The 11+ controversy <ul><li>Many people across the province do not agree with the 11+ scrappage, as there has been nothing to replace it with. </li></ul><ul><li>A few catholic schools have created their own test which charges parents a certain fee to let their child sit the test. </li></ul><ul><li>Other than this, children are put into a ‘catchment area’ of each school and those who are within the catchment area gain automatic entrance to the school without any regards to level of knowledge or skills within the school </li></ul>
  15. 15. What do you think the 11+ scrappage means? <ul><li>Do you think it was a good idea? </li></ul><ul><li>Do you think the system would be good for Spain? </li></ul><ul><li>What would teachers have to do? </li></ul><ul><li>Are children prepared for exams in secondary school? </li></ul><ul><li>Is it right that pupils can get into a top school just because they live close to it? </li></ul>

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