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Knife Skills And Cutting Techniques
Tip: Used for slicing and handling small items such as shallots, mushrooms, and onions.  Edge: This is where all of the wo...
Heel: Last few inches of the cutting edge. This part of the blade is used when maximum leverage is needed or for heavy cut...
Chef's Knife   Adapted from Cooking 101, a trademark of Very Edible Productions, LLC. U.S.A. Copyright 2005 The most versa...
Boning Knife   Adapted from Cooking 101, a trademark of Very Edible Productions, LLC. U.S.A. Copyright 2005 A thin bladed ...
Slicer   Adapted from Cooking 101, a trademark of Very Edible Productions, LLC. U.S.A. Copyright 2005 Has a very thin, sha...
Serrated Bread Knife   Adapted from Cooking 101, a trademark of Very Edible Productions, LLC. U.S.A. Copyright 2005 Common...
Paring Knife   Adapted from Cooking 101, a trademark of Very Edible Productions, LLC. U.S.A. Copyright 2005 Perhaps the mo...
Steel   Adapted from Cooking 101, a trademark of Very Edible Productions, LLC. U.S.A. Copyright 2005 A steel is used to ho...
To make a chiffonade (very thin strips) of a leafy green such as baby spinach, stack individual leaves on top one another,...
<ul><li>Seeding Tomato:   </li></ul><ul><li>Using the paring knife, cut a circle around the stem and pull it out.  </li></...
To cut vegetables for stir-fry, hold the knife at about a 45-degree angle to the cutting board, with the edge of the knife...
A julienne (also called a &quot;matchstick&quot;) is a type of cut that makes a long thin strip. It's a good technique to ...
<ul><li>Peel the skin from the vegetable if necessary.  </li></ul><ul><li>Trim away any root or stem parts of the vegetabl...
A diced vegetable is cut into small cubes. It's easy to dice quickly and evenly once you have the knack. Just think &quot;...
Cut the vegetable lengthwise into even slices, then stack the slices and cut them into long sticks. (Long vegetables like ...
Mince To mince with a knife, press the vegetable tightly to the cutting board, chopping as you go until it's as fine as yo...
Mincing does take some time, but for some recipes it's important to do it. Not just for the texture, but also because it h...
Start with a sharp knife and a large, firm onion for ease of cutting. Gripping the onion and with fingertips curved, slice...
Peel back the onion skin, discarding the skin. Place onion halves onto the cutting board with flat sides down. Slice off a...
Move your fingers out  of the way  and grip the onion at the root end. Make a parallel cut, slightly angled down toward th...
Gripping the onion and keeping your fingers curved away from the knife, slice across the onion in parallel cuts.  Repeat f...
Special Cuts for Special Taco Toppings Tomatoes, cabbage, capsicum, sweet corn, carrot, onions, pannier, green peas, baby ...
Trays
Fruit Bowls, Baskets and Boats
Radish Roses and Rosettes
Green Onion Garnish
And Fun!
 
Cold Tofu Salad   8 oz silken tofu, diced into 1 inch cubes 2 stalks green onions, minced 2 tbsp preserved mustard green, ...
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Knife and Cutting Techniques

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Anatomy of the knife, different knives and their uses, basic cuts for fruits and vegetables.

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Transcript of "Knife and Cutting Techniques"

  1. 1. Knife Skills And Cutting Techniques
  2. 2. Tip: Used for slicing and handling small items such as shallots, mushrooms, and onions. Edge: This is where all of the work takes place, the part you cut with. Spine: Smooth top part of the knife. It allows you to grip the knife between the thumb and forefinger for good control during cutting and chopping. Parts of the Knife Adapted from Cooking 101, a trademark of Very Edible Productions, LLC. U.S.A. Copyright 2005
  3. 3. Heel: Last few inches of the cutting edge. This part of the blade is used when maximum leverage is needed or for heavy cutting tasks. Bolster: Part between the blade and the handle that assists in the balance of the knife. Tang: Metal that extends into the handle. On a good knife, the tang will extend all the way to the butt of the handle, and the rivets will go through the tang (known as a full tang). This helps create a well balanced knife. Adapted from Cooking 101, a trademark of Very Edible Productions, LLC. U.S.A. Copyright 2005
  4. 4. Chef's Knife Adapted from Cooking 101, a trademark of Very Edible Productions, LLC. U.S.A. Copyright 2005 The most versatile knife in the kitchen. Makes slicing, dicing, mincing and chopping fun. Chef's knives are usually 6” - 12” long with 8” being the average.
  5. 5. Boning Knife Adapted from Cooking 101, a trademark of Very Edible Productions, LLC. U.S.A. Copyright 2005 A thin bladed knife used for removing the bones of poultry, meat, and fish. The blade is generally 6 inches long and may be rigid or flexible.
  6. 6. Slicer Adapted from Cooking 101, a trademark of Very Edible Productions, LLC. U.S.A. Copyright 2005 Has a very thin, sharp edge that quickly and easily cuts meats and fish without tearing. It comes especially handy during the holiday season to carve the perfect turkey.
  7. 7. Serrated Bread Knife Adapted from Cooking 101, a trademark of Very Edible Productions, LLC. U.S.A. Copyright 2005 Commonly known as a bread knife. It is purposely designed with a long serrated blade and a blunt end. The teeth (serrations) allow it to cut bread using less vertical force, which keeps the bread from being compressed or crushed. It is the best knife available for angel food cake.
  8. 8. Paring Knife Adapted from Cooking 101, a trademark of Very Edible Productions, LLC. U.S.A. Copyright 2005 Perhaps the most versatile of knives. It is a short knife with a 2 to 4- inch long blade. Because it is designed for peeling and trimming fruits and vegetables, the paring knife's edge must be kept sharp. These knives are also used for carving specialty shapes and garnishes.
  9. 9. Steel Adapted from Cooking 101, a trademark of Very Edible Productions, LLC. U.S.A. Copyright 2005 A steel is used to hone, not sharpen, knives. It is made of hard, high-carbon steel or ceramic. It comes as a long, tapered, round rod, but some people prefer the flat model. Use a steel on a knife before each use and throughout food preparation to keep the blade razor sharp. To use a steel, hold the knife at a 20° angle and pull across in a swift motion from the heel to the tip of the knife 6 to 8 times, alternating sides.
  10. 10. To make a chiffonade (very thin strips) of a leafy green such as baby spinach, stack individual leaves on top one another, then tightly roll them up lengthwise. Using a chef's knife, cut the rolled bundle of leaves crosswise into thin slices. Unroll the strips and use them as desired. Chiffonade
  11. 11. <ul><li>Seeding Tomato: </li></ul><ul><li>Using the paring knife, cut a circle around the stem and pull it out. </li></ul><ul><li>Next, place the tomato on the cutting board and slice it crosswise using the serrated knife or chef's knife. </li></ul><ul><li>Pick up a tomato half and hold the cut side over the bowl. </li></ul><ul><li>Gently squeeze, letting the tomato seeds drip into the bowl. </li></ul>
  12. 12. To cut vegetables for stir-fry, hold the knife at about a 45-degree angle to the cutting board, with the edge of the knife facing away from you. Slice vegetables into equally thick pieces. More surface area results in faster cooking, which is required for stir fry.
  13. 13. A julienne (also called a &quot;matchstick&quot;) is a type of cut that makes a long thin strip. It's a good technique to use for vegetables and other ingredients when you want to heighten their presentation Julienne Cuts
  14. 14. <ul><li>Peel the skin from the vegetable if necessary. </li></ul><ul><li>Trim away any root or stem parts of the vegetable. </li></ul><ul><li>If the vegetable is round like a potato or carrot, cut it in half and lay it cut side down on the board. This will keep it from rolling. </li></ul><ul><li>Cut the edible part of the vegetable into slices about 1/4-inch thick. Cut around the seeds if necessary. </li></ul><ul><li>Cut these slices into even strips 1/4-inch thick </li></ul>
  15. 15. A diced vegetable is cut into small cubes. It's easy to dice quickly and evenly once you have the knack. Just think &quot;slices, sticks, and cubes.&quot;               Diced Vegetables
  16. 16. Cut the vegetable lengthwise into even slices, then stack the slices and cut them into long sticks. (Long vegetables like celery and leeks need only be sliced into sticks.) Gather the sticks and cut them crosswise into cubes. Make sure to get the cubes as even as you can   For round vegetables like carrots and potatoes, cut in half lengthwise and lay cut-side down on the cutting board. This will keep the vegetable from rolling.
  17. 17. Mince To mince with a knife, press the vegetable tightly to the cutting board, chopping as you go until it's as fine as you like. Rocking the knife back and forth results in a very fine mince.
  18. 18. Mincing does take some time, but for some recipes it's important to do it. Not just for the texture, but also because it helps the flavor of the vegetable to meld better with the other ingredients.
  19. 19. Start with a sharp knife and a large, firm onion for ease of cutting. Gripping the onion and with fingertips curved, slice in half from the root end straight through to the top end. Split the onion in two equal halves, leaving the root ends attached. Onions
  20. 20. Peel back the onion skin, discarding the skin. Place onion halves onto the cutting board with flat sides down. Slice off about 1-inch from the top end of the onion Grip an onion half firmly, curving the fingertips away from the knife for safety. Slice evenly in parallel cuts from one side of the onion across to the other. Thinner cuts will result in smaller dice; thicker cuts for larger dice
  21. 21. Move your fingers out of the way and grip the onion at the root end. Make a parallel cut, slightly angled down toward the cutting board. Make a second parallel slice above the first one and also slightly angled toward the cutting board (and away from your fingers)
  22. 22. Gripping the onion and keeping your fingers curved away from the knife, slice across the onion in parallel cuts. Repeat for the second onion half, chopping the onions from the last few cuts to make even dice.
  23. 23. Special Cuts for Special Taco Toppings Tomatoes, cabbage, capsicum, sweet corn, carrot, onions, pannier, green peas, baby corn and grated pannier
  24. 24. Trays
  25. 25. Fruit Bowls, Baskets and Boats
  26. 26. Radish Roses and Rosettes
  27. 27. Green Onion Garnish
  28. 28. And Fun!
  29. 30. Cold Tofu Salad 8 oz silken tofu, diced into 1 inch cubes 2 stalks green onions, minced 2 tbsp preserved mustard green, minced 2 tbsp pork sung 1 tsp sesame oil 1-2 tbsp soy sauce Good Practice
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