Green Architecture

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  • Green Architecture

    1. 1. Green Architecture
    2. 2. LEED The Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Green Building Rating System, Developed by the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC), provides a suite of standards for environmentally sustainable construction. Started in 1998
    3. 3. What is a Green Building? Green buildings are designed to reduce the overall impact of the built environment on human health and the natural environment by • Efficiently using energy, water, and other resources • Protecting occupant health and improving employee productivity • Reducing waste, pollution and environmental degradation
    4. 4. Hearst Tower New York City, New York 300 West 57th Street on Eighth Avenue, near Columbus Circle World headquarters of the Hearst Corporation • Cosmopolitan • Good Housekeeping
    5. 5. Hearst Tower Former six-story headquarters building was commissioned by the founder, William Randolph Hearst Awarded to the architect Joseph Urban The building was completed in 1928 at a cost of $2 million and contained 40,000 sq. ft. The original cast stone facade has been preserved in the new design as a designated Landmark site. Originally built as the base for a proposed skyscraper, the
    6. 6. Hearst Tower Former six-story headquarters building was commissioned by the founder, William Randolph Hearst Awarded to the architect Joseph Urban The building was completed in 1928 at a cost of $2 million and contained 40,000 sq. ft. The original cast stone facade has been preserved in the new design as a designated Landmark site. Originally built as the base for a proposed skyscraper, the
    7. 7. Hearst Tower The new tower addition was completed nearly eighty years later • 2000 Hearst employees moved in on 4 May 2006. Architect Norman Foster 46 stories tall & standing 182 m (597 ft) The uncommon triangular framing pattern (also known as a diagrid) required 9,500 metric tons (10,480 tons) of structural steel – reportedly about 20% less than a conventional steel frame.
    8. 8. Hearst Tower First green building completed in New York City • Floor of the atrium is paved with heat conductive limestone. • Polyethylene tubing is embedded under the floor and filled with circulating water for cooling in the summer and heating in the winter. • Rain collected on the roof is stored in a tank in the basement for use in the cooling system, to irrigate plants and for the water sculpture in the main lobby. • The building was constructed using 80% recycled steel.
    9. 9. Hearst Tower First green building completed in New York City • Floor of the atrium is paved with heat conductive limestone. • Polyethylene tubing is embedded under the floor and filled with circulating water for cooling in the summer and heating in the winter. • Rain collected on the roof is stored in a tank in the basement for use in the cooling system, to irrigate plants and for the water sculpture in the main lobby. • The building was constructed using 80% recycled steel.
    10. 10. Hearst Tower Earned a gold designation from the United States Green Building Council’s LEED certification program. Atrium features escalators which run through a 3-story water sculpture titled Icefall, a wide waterfall built with thousands of glass panels, which cools and humidifies the lobby air. The water element is complemented by a 70-foot (21.3 m) tall fresco painting entitled Riverlines by artist Richard Long.
    11. 11. California Academy of Science
    12. 12. California Academy of Science
    13. 13. California Academy of Science
    14. 14. California Academy of Science
    15. 15. California Academy of Science
    16. 16. California Academy of Science
    17. 17. California Academy of Science
    18. 18. California Academy of Science
    19. 19. California Academy of Science
    20. 20. California Academy of Science
    21. 21. California Academy of Sciences The Material World • 90% of all demolition materials were recycled • 32,000 tons of sand from foundation excavation applied to dune restoration projects in San Francisco • 95% of all steel from recycled sources • 50% of lumber harvested from sustainable-yield forests • 68% of insulation comes from recycled blue jeans • 90% of office space will have natural light and ventilation • 30% less energy consumption than federal code requirement
    22. 22. Omi International Arts Center convened hundreds of visual artists, musicians, and dancers at its upstate New York compound to take part in programs designed to foster creativity 300-acre center to stroll its extensive sculpture park 4,300-square-foot Charles Benenson Visitor Center and Gallery, Ghent, New York– based Peter Franck and Kathleen Triem, LEED AP, kept their focus local, putting an updated spin on the region’s traditional
    23. 23. Omi International Arts Center convened hundreds of visual artists, musicians, and dancers at its upstate New York compound to take part in programs designed to foster creativity 300-acre center to stroll its extensive sculpture park 4,300-square-foot Charles Benenson Visitor Center and Gallery, Ghent, New York– based Peter Franck and Kathleen Triem, LEED AP, kept their focus local, putting an updated spin on the region’s traditional
    24. 24. Omi International Arts Center convened hundreds of visual artists, musicians, and dancers at its upstate New York compound to take part in programs designed to foster creativity 300-acre center to stroll its extensive sculpture park 4,300-square-foot Charles Benenson Visitor Center and Gallery, Ghent, New York– based Peter Franck and Kathleen Triem, LEED AP, kept their focus local, putting an updated spin on the region’s traditional
    25. 25. Omi International Arts Center convened hundreds of visual artists, musicians, and dancers at its upstate New York compound to take part in programs designed to foster creativity 300-acre center to stroll its extensive sculpture park 4,300-square-foot Charles Benenson Visitor Center and Gallery, Ghent, New York– based Peter Franck and Kathleen Triem, LEED AP, kept their focus local, putting an updated spin on the region’s traditional
    26. 26. Omi International Arts Center Franck and Triem, who operate under the banner F:T Architecture + Interiors, Instead of replicating a Hudson Valley barn modern evocation of utilitarian farm architecture • better to display contemporary art design utilizes posts and beams, shade screen installed along glazed stretches of the low-slung, boomerang- shaped volume recall open- air livestock stalls.
    27. 27. Omi International Arts Center Franck and Triem, who operate under the banner F:T Architecture + Interiors, Instead of replicating a Hudson Valley barn modern evocation of utilitarian farm architecture • better to display contemporary art design utilizes posts and beams, shade screen installed along glazed stretches of the low-slung, boomerang- shaped volume recall open- air livestock stalls.
    28. 28. Omi International Arts Center Franck and Triem, who operate under the banner F:T Architecture + Interiors, Instead of replicating a Hudson Valley barn modern evocation of utilitarian farm architecture • better to display contemporary art design utilizes posts and beams, shade screen installed along glazed stretches of the low-slung, boomerang- shaped volume recall open- air livestock stalls.
    29. 29. Omi International Arts Center Franck and Triem, who operate under the banner F:T Architecture + Interiors, Instead of replicating a Hudson Valley barn modern evocation of utilitarian farm architecture • better to display contemporary art design utilizes posts and beams, shade screen installed along glazed stretches of the low-slung, boomerang- shaped volume recall open- air livestock stalls.
    30. 30. Omi International Arts Center Franck and Triem, who operate under the banner F:T Architecture + Interiors, Instead of replicating a Hudson Valley barn modern evocation of utilitarian farm architecture • better to display contemporary art design utilizes posts and beams, shade screen installed along glazed stretches of the low-slung, boomerang- shaped volume recall open- air livestock stalls.
    31. 31. Omi International Arts Center backdrop for the reception desk — clad in cypress and hemlock salvaged mushroom farms in western New York & Pennsylvania. • “The mushrooms produce an enzyme that eats away at the soft portion of the wood, leaving the material as if it had naturally weathered, but with a very beautiful honey-brown color,” Triem explains.. Roof of the Charles Benenson Visitor Center and Gallery is covered in native grasses. • “We set out to source locally and happily had not much trouble doing so,” Triem says. Franck adds, “In addition to making good ecological
    32. 32. Omi International Arts Center backdrop for the reception desk — clad in cypress and hemlock salvaged mushroom farms in western New York & Pennsylvania. • “The mushrooms produce an enzyme that eats away at the soft portion of the wood, leaving the material as if it had naturally weathered, but with a very beautiful honey-brown color,” Triem explains.. Roof of the Charles Benenson Visitor Center and Gallery is covered in native grasses. • “We set out to source locally and happily had not much trouble doing so,” Triem says. Franck adds, “In addition to making good ecological
    33. 33. Bronx Library Center Architect: Dattner Architects Gross Square Footage: 78,000 ft2 (7,200 m2) cost $31 million completed January 2006 annual percentage energy used is 28% reduction from base case Intensified the community aspects by centering its design around a four-story- high-performance glass curtain wall that fronts East Kingsbridge Road, just steps from the Bronx’s busy
    34. 34. Bronx Library Center Architect: Dattner Architects Gross Square Footage: 78,000 ft2 (7,200 m2) cost $31 million completed January 2006 annual percentage energy used is 28% reduction from base case Intensified the community aspects by centering its design around a four-story- high-performance glass curtain wall that fronts East Kingsbridge Road, just steps from the Bronx’s busy
    35. 35. Bronx Library Center Architect: Dattner Architects Gross Square Footage: 78,000 ft2 (7,200 m2) cost $31 million completed January 2006 annual percentage energy used is 28% reduction from base case Intensified the community aspects by centering its design around a four-story- high-performance glass curtain wall that fronts East Kingsbridge Road, just steps from the Bronx’s busy
    36. 36. Bronx Library Center Architect: Dattner Architects Gross Square Footage: 78,000 ft2 (7,200 m2) cost $31 million completed January 2006 annual percentage energy used is 28% reduction from base case Intensified the community aspects by centering its design around a four-story- high-performance glass curtain wall that fronts East Kingsbridge Road, just steps from the Bronx’s busy
    37. 37. Bronx Library Center Architect: Dattner Architects Gross Square Footage: 78,000 ft2 (7,200 m2) cost $31 million completed January 2006 annual percentage energy used is 28% reduction from base case Intensified the community aspects by centering its design around a four-story- high-performance glass curtain wall that fronts East Kingsbridge Road, just steps from the Bronx’s busy
    38. 38. Bronx Library Center Architect: Dattner Architects Gross Square Footage: 78,000 ft2 (7,200 m2) cost $31 million completed January 2006 annual percentage energy used is 28% reduction from base case Intensified the community aspects by centering its design around a four-story- high-performance glass curtain wall that fronts East Kingsbridge Road, just steps from the Bronx’s busy
    39. 39. Bronx Library Center Reading areas are positioned along the curtain wall in a 16-foot-wide structural cantilever, resulting in a display of people that makes the building look more like a busy retail store than a traditional library. Wanted to achieve openness without sacrificing energy efficiency Translucent nylon mesh mechanized shades, integrated into the wall system, manually operate at each floor’s service desk.
    40. 40. Bronx Library Center Reading areas are positioned along the curtain wall in a 16-foot-wide structural cantilever, resulting in a display of people that makes the building look more like a busy retail store than a traditional library. Wanted to achieve openness without sacrificing energy efficiency Translucent nylon mesh mechanized shades, integrated into the wall system, manually operate at each floor’s service desk.
    41. 41. Bronx Library Center Reading areas are positioned along the curtain wall in a 16-foot-wide structural cantilever, resulting in a display of people that makes the building look more like a busy retail store than a traditional library. Wanted to achieve openness without sacrificing energy efficiency Translucent nylon mesh mechanized shades, integrated into the wall system, manually operate at each floor’s service desk.
    42. 42. Bronx Library Center Reading areas are positioned along the curtain wall in a 16-foot-wide structural cantilever, resulting in a display of people that makes the building look more like a busy retail store than a traditional library. Wanted to achieve openness without sacrificing energy efficiency Translucent nylon mesh mechanized shades, integrated into the wall system, manually operate at each floor’s service desk.
    43. 43. Bronx Library Center Reading areas are positioned along the curtain wall in a 16-foot-wide structural cantilever, resulting in a display of people that makes the building look more like a busy retail store than a traditional library. Wanted to achieve openness without sacrificing energy efficiency Translucent nylon mesh mechanized shades, integrated into the wall system, manually operate at each floor’s service desk.
    44. 44. Bronx Library Center Reading areas are positioned along the curtain wall in a 16-foot-wide structural cantilever, resulting in a display of people that makes the building look more like a busy retail store than a traditional library. Wanted to achieve openness without sacrificing energy efficiency Translucent nylon mesh mechanized shades, integrated into the wall system, manually operate at each floor’s service desk.
    45. 45. Bronx Library Center For the main reading room on the fourth floor, the architects wanted to “peel back” the ceiling up to the fifth-floor mezzanine to create a west-facing clerestory that would let late-afternoon sun flood the two floors. Swooping ceiling and roof element crown the building, establishing library’s claim to civic landmark status. A Con Edison utility building previously on the site was torn down; • 80 percent of it was recycled,
    46. 46. Bronx Library Center For the main reading room on the fourth floor, the architects wanted to “peel back” the ceiling up to the fifth-floor mezzanine to create a west-facing clerestory that would let late-afternoon sun flood the two floors. Swooping ceiling and roof element crown the building, establishing library’s claim to civic landmark status. A Con Edison utility building previously on the site was torn down; • 80 percent of it was recycled,
    47. 47. American Embassy in Sofia, March 13, 2007 received LEED for New Construction certification. There are some unique challenges when building a green embassy building with the most prominent one being the issue of safety. • The Sofia Embassy building design was based on a model created after the dual bombings of embassies in Kenya and Tanzania. • This ensured that the embassy would incorporate the safety features from the Standard Embassy Design (PDF) as it implemented green building
    48. 48. American Embassy in Sofia, Sensors and timers ensure that lights are turned off when rooms are unoccupied or when there is sufficient daylight. Lightshelves contribute to the daylighting, and energy use is further reduced by a solar water heater and extra insulation. 1/3 of the project’s materials were sourced from within 500 miles of the project site. First LEED certified U.S. Embassy building
    49. 49. American Embassy in Sofia, Sensors and timers ensure that lights are turned off when rooms are unoccupied or when there is sufficient daylight. Lightshelves contribute to the daylighting, and energy use is further reduced by a solar water heater and extra insulation. 1/3 of the project’s materials were sourced from within 500 miles of the project site. First LEED certified U.S. Embassy building
    50. 50. Discussion Roundup materials • focusing on recycling materials • (similar or dissimilar to Romans excavating ancient sites?) • incorporating the natural world • (is this a modern idea? or an established idea?) design choices made for reasons beyond aesthetics • environment is key thinking a great deal about interior environment and user experience • lighting • (how does this relate to lighting of gothic churches?) • new and different ways of regulating interior systems (temperature, water) • (how does this relate to Roman bath houses?)
    51. 51. Reflection Can beautiful design and sustainability co-exist in a building? What do you think about combining new and old? For example, the Hearst Tower being built on the facade of the 1928 building. Do you think it’s important to think about the environment when we build new buildings?

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