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Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
Work effectively recap wk 13
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Work effectively recap wk 13

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  • 1. CHCRF301E Work effectively with families to care for the child Recap – Weeks 2 to 13 24/10/2013
  • 2. Work effectively with families to care for the child Unit Introduction Week 2 – 25/7/2013
  • 3. Element 1 – Establish a positive relationship with family members
  • 4. The family is the most powerful influence on children's learning and development; therefore it is crucial that children's experience in their family and the family's perspective on the child are taken into account and that professionals operate in partnership with parents on behalf of their child. 
  • 5. The most significant contribution that children's services professionals can make to a child's life is to enhance parent's understanding and appreciation of their child, increase their confidence in carrying out the challenging and enormously complex role of being a parent, and ensure that they understand that they are the most important people in their child's life.
  • 6. While there are some dimensions of the parenting role that cannot and should not be delegated to anyone else, in many ways the notion embodied in this Framework is that use of a children's service can be likened to sharing parenting, sharing the provisions for the child's development. (Stonehouse, 2002)
  • 7. Week 3 1/8/2013 Considering standards, policies and procedures • Discuss assessment guide • Set due dates and submission format Element 1 – Establish a positive relationship with family members
  • 8. Work effectively with families to care for the child When working in child care services we: • Must acknowledge parents are the primary carers • Respect that parents have the right to be involved in decisions relating to the individual care of their child • Why? • Who benefits? • How do they benefit?
  • 9. Considering standards, policies and procedures Various legal, ethical and professional standards and bodies guide our practices, our philosophy and our policies: Who, or what, are they?
  • 10. Governing bodies and standards • The Department of Education and Communities • Australian Children's Education and Care Quality Authority (ACECQA) • The National Quality Framework (NQF) • The National Quality Standards (NQS) • The Education and Care Services' National Regulations 2011 • Belonging, Being and Becoming (EYLF) • Early Childhood Australia (ECA) Code of Ethics
  • 11. The Code of Ethics (2006) is given as an example. Please note that for the purpose of this unit, only one section of the Code of Ethics is provided – working with families.
  • 12. ECA Code of Ethics In this Code of Ethics, for the purposes of this document, these terms are given the following meanings: • Children People between the ages of birth and eight years. • Families The people who have significant care responsibilities for and/or kinship relationships with the child. • Early childhood professional A person who works with or on behalf of children and families in early childhood settings. • Communities Groups of people who identify as having shared values and intentions. These groups are recognised as complex, being simultaneously connected by commonality and diversity. • Employer An individual or organisation which employs early childhood professionals. • Student A person undertaking study at a secondary or tertiary institution.
  • 13. Week 4 8/8/2013 What do we mean by families? Effective communication Barriers to effective communication Element 1 – Establish a positive relationship with family members
  • 14. What do we mean by families? What is a family?
  • 15. • The concept and context of family has changed over the past few generations. • What kinds of families are there in our society?
  • 16. • What kinds of families are there in our society? • Families with 2 parents; • Families with single parents; • Families with non-English speaking parents; • Families from cultures other than your own; • Australian Indigenous Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander families; • Blended families; • Gay families; • Foster parents; • Grandparent/extended families; • Families with strict religious/cultural convictions; • Families who have additional needs.
  • 17. Effective communication Barriers to effective communication Both these areas covered in the recapping of the communication unit CHCCOM201C .
  • 18. Week 5 15/8/2013 and Week 6 22/8/2013 Creating welcoming environments Element 1 – Establish a positive relationship with family members & Element 2 – Exchange information with family members about the child's physical and emotional care needs
  • 19. Creating welcoming environments We are constantly exchanging information through the words we speak and those that we do not. We also communicate by the way we choose to set up our environment. When we plan our environment we need to consider such aspects as the physical environment and materials as well as human and behavioural aspects within the setting.
  • 20. When we look at the term welcoming environments – there are 2 areas that can be defined • The physical environment, and • How we communicate (the emotional/social environment).
  • 21. When communicating with parents • Show interest • Be positive • Be warm and friendly • Show empathy and sensitivity • Respond to questions and concerns • Share decisions • Honour the role of the parent • Avoid implying blame or criticism • Celebrate the partnership • Tell parents they are doing a good job Kearns, K., 2010, The Big Picture, Pearson: Aust. (p.170)
  • 22. More points to consider • Remember parents and child carers view things differently • Make the service accessible and welcoming • Make staff accessible • Ensure that policies and practices are “parent friendly” • Think about the quantity and quality of information given to parents Kearns, K., 2010, The Big Picture, Pearson: Aust. (p.170)
  • 23. What do you think the term cultural competence means? • Look up the EYLF glossary to find out it's meaning. • How would you include families from diverse backgrounds and cultures? • How would you make Australian Indigenous Aborigines feel welcome?
  • 24. Partnerships (Code of Ethics revisited from Wk 3)
  • 25. Carers who behave in a professional manner: • Use language that communicates professionalism and respect • Treat parents with courtesy and respect regardless of what has been said or done • Maintain confidentiality when parents share private information Kearns, K., 2010, The Big Picture, Pearson: Aust. (p.170)
  • 26. Partnerships (CONT) Partnerships are all about power and shared decision making. Success depends on; • Mutual respect • Understanding and appreciating the perspectives of each • Two way communication • Common goals • Realistic expectations • Teamwork • Equality or defined roles, rights and responsibilities • Shared decision making
  • 27. Partnerships • Partnerships are built on mutual trust and respect. They recognise and value the ideas and opinions of all parties and, in early childhood services, both families and staff need to work together to support young children’s learning.
  • 28. Partners • • • • • • • • • Have mutual respect for each other Work towards the same goals Co-operate, rather than compete with each other Are willing to consider the other’s point of view Communicate effectively with each other Value each other’s role in caring for child Develop a balance of power (equally important) Have confidence in each other to do best for child Keep each other informed about the child Kearns, K., 2010, The Big Picture, Pearson: Aust. (p. 157)
  • 29. 5 stages Roslyn Elliott outlines the five simple stages of the communication spiral which will engage families and strengthen the links between children's services and home. In doing so, you will be surprised at the valuable knowledge you will uncover. Each stage of the spiral process builds upon the achievements/developments of the last. Enhancing staff-parent communication brings services closer to providing the ideal environment needed to support children leading to positive outcomes for both the children and the community.
  • 30. MASLOW These stages correspond to Maslow’s (1968) hierarchy of needs, which explains how humans have identifiable levels of need that must be met for their total wellbeing and development of ‘self’. These needs begin with: (1) physiological needs (food, water, clothing); then move to (2) safety and security; followed by (3) affection; and then (4) belonging. Meeting all these needs leads to (5) self-actualisation (Maslow, 1968).
  • 31. • This Code of Ethics provides a framework for reflection about the ethical responsibilities of early childhood professionals.
  • 32. ECA Code of Ethics In this Code of Ethics, for the purposes of this document, these terms are given the following meanings: • Children People between the ages of birth and eight years. • Families The people who have significant care responsibilities for and/or kinship relationships with the child. • Early childhood professional A person who works with or on behalf of children and families in early childhood settings. • Communities Groups of people who identify as having shared values and intentions. These groups are recognised as complex, being simultaneously connected by commonality and diversity. • Employer An individual or organisation which employs early childhood professionals. • Student A person undertaking study at a secondary or tertiary institution.
  • 33. II. In relation to families, I will: 1. Listen to and learn from families, in order to acknowledge and build upon their strengths and competencies, and support them in their role of nurturing children. 2. Assist each family to develop a sense of belonging and inclusion. 3. Develop positive relationships based on mutual trust and open communication. 4. Develop partnerships with families and engage in shared decision making where appropriate. 5. Acknowledge the rights of families to make decisions about their children. 6. Respect the uniqueness of each family and strive to learn about their culture, structure, lifestyle, customs, language, beliefs and kinship systems. 7. Develop shared planning, monitoring and assessment practices for children’s learning and communicate this in ways that families understand. 8. Acknowledge that each family is affected by the community contexts in which they engage. 9. Be sensitive to the vulnerabilities of children and families and respond in ways that empower and maintain the dignity of all children and families. 10. Maintain confidentiality and respect the right of the family to privacy.
  • 34. EYLF • Implementing the EYLF An evolving story • 'Implementing the EYLF, with its focus on "Belonging, Being and Becoming", provides us with yet another avenue for exploring and initiating quality relationships with children.' • Children's learning and development is dependent on them feeling safe and having strong connections with the adults who care for them.
  • 35. Exchanging information with families about the child's physical and emotional needs • The National Quality Standard Quality Area 1 – Educational program and practice states 'that documentation about each child's program and progress is available to families'... • According to ACECQA's Guide to the NQS, Element 1.1.4 p 32., this includes 'how they access it and how meaningful it is to them. Nominated supervisors and educators should have an understanding of the importance of regular communication with families'. • What does that mean for educators?
  • 36. • LOOK UP NATIONAL QUALITY AREA 6 • This area gives details on what is expected from services in relation to collaborative partnerships. It also outlines the process of exchanging written and verbal information with families. The EYLF principles and practices also details the importance of this exchange of information. • Write a diary entry/day note/communication note to inform families of the days activities and events based on this information.
  • 37. • HOW MUCH INFORMATION DO WE NEED TO SUPPORT THE CHILDREN IN OUR CARE?
  • 38. • WE NEED AS MUCH AS POSSIBLE ABOUT CHILDREN'S • NEEDS • ROUTINES • PREFERENCES and • INTERESTS BUT HOW DO WE OBTAIN THIS?
  • 39. • IF WE ARE TO OFFER CONSISTENCY AND CONTINUITY, WHICH ARE INDICATORS OF HIGH QUALITY CARE, THEN WE NEED TO BE CONTINUALLY INVOLVED IN A PARTNERSHIP OF SHARING INFORMATION WITH FAMILIES – BOTH INITIALLY WHEN THEY COMMENCE AND THEN ON AN EVERYDAY LEVEL.
  • 40. • PLEASE NOTE HOW THE INFORMATION IN WEEK 7 RELATES TO ASSESSMENT TASKS 1 AND 2. • WEEK 8 WILL DEAL PARTICULARLY ABOUT GATHERING INFORMATION – ASSESSMENT TASK 2.
  • 41. Week 8 5/9/2013 Element 2 – Exchange information with family members about the child's physical and emotional care needs Element 4 – Reach agreement with family members about care practices
  • 42. • Communicate information in a culturally appropriate way • Establishing preferred communication strategies • Sharing opportunities • Responding promptly to messages • Gathering information Training package Pp 46 - 53
  • 43. Communicate information in a culturally appropriate way How can we achieve this on an everyday level? • Be open and accepting in our practices so families feel comfortable sharing information; • Ensure we do not support cultural or stereotypical biases in any of our practices;
  • 44. Communicate information in a culturally appropriate way How can we achieve this on an everyday level? • Continuously gain understanding and information about our own and others practices and how these can be accepted into the setting; • Check with individual families about their preferred communication styles & times.
  • 45. Establishing preferred communication strategies • The communication strategies that we use with families will constantly change or evolve. • As we become more familiar with families we might find that preferences change or they may not have been as clear as we first imagined them to be. • The way in which we communicate with families will depend on the preferences of the child's family.
  • 46. Establishing preferred communication strategies The quantity and type of information required by families will be influenced by a number of factors, namely: • The amount of time their child has been at the service; • The age of the child; • Issues at home; • Issues of the day.
  • 47. Sharing Opportunities (CONT) So how do we provide opportunities to share information? • Observations/interactions/communication book • Newsletters • Meetings • Mascot • Letters/emails/phone calls • Enrolment form/orientation • Noticeboard
  • 48. Responding promptly to messages • IF WE ARE NOT CONCERNED ABOUT ACTING IN A PROFESSIONAL MANNER IN THE WAY WE DEAL WITH FAMILIES, THEN HOW CAN WE BE TRUSTED TO CARE FOR THEIR CHILDREN?
  • 49. Gathering information • LETS HAVE A LOOK AT SOME EXAMPLES OF GATHERING INFORMATION ABOUT CHILDREN THAT IS REQUIRED FOR ASSESSMENT TASK 2.
  • 50. •Parent information sheet •Background Information Sheet
  • 51. BACKGROUND INFORMATION SHEETS Form that caregivers can give parents to complete on their child’s needs, interests and learning styles. Assists in providing individualised care. Gives you background information on the individual child. Assists with settling children. their child’s needs, interests and learning styles.
  • 52. HANDOUT: BIS Example 1
  • 53. HANDOUT: BIS Example 2
  • 54. HANDOUT: BIS Example 2 3 pages
  • 55. HANDOUT: BIS Example 2 3 pages
  • 56. HANDOUT: BIS Example 2 3 pages
  • 57. For are to createchild: Information Sheet to give to focus a Background Students Students are to create a Background Information Sheet to give to their focus child’s parent/caregiver. Consider the following areas when devising your Background Information Sheet Family members Rest / Sleep requirements Toileting requirements Eating / Feeding Health Play interests Social skills Communication styles Parents goals / concerns Open ended questions heir focus child’s parent/caregiver. Consider the following areas when devising your Background
  • 58. Week 9 12/9/2013 Element 2 – Exchange information with family members about the child's physical and emotional care needs Element 4 – Reach agreement with family members about care practices
  • 59. • Reaching agreements about care practices • When agreements cannot be reached • Communicating decisions clearly Training package Pp 53 - 58
  • 60. Reaching agreements about care practices • Families need to feel welcome in a service. • They need to feel that they are able to discuss their requirements and wishes for their child. • Consistency between home and centre care practices is essential.... • This assists families to settle into the service. • Consistency helps to minimise anxiety – for both children and parents......
  • 61. Reaching agreements about care practices • It is relatively easy to work with a family to care for a child when the approach taken is similar to our own thinking and practices. • When requests made by families are alittle unusual or outside of our own experiences, it becomes a little more difficult.
  • 62. Reaching agreements about care practices • It is also important to discuss any unusual or difficult requests with your colleagues and the director of the service. They may have different perspectives and see ways that you can meet the parents' requests without difficulty or disruption.
  • 63. When agreements cannot be reached • There may be times when we are asked to implement care practices that we may not be comfortable with. • Not all requests will be appropriate for us to implement. • There are numerous reasons why – and they can include...
  • 64. When agreements cannot be reached EXAMPLES INCLUDE.... • The resources available to us. We may not have the staff or physical resources available to accommodate the request. • Insufficient time. • The time the request needed to be implemented may be busy/rest time.
  • 65. • The physical layout of the building offers restrictions. • Our own health, stamina may hinder the execution of the request. • The number of children in care may prove difficult. • The request may not be in the best interests of the child. • It contravenes regulations/standards/ethics.
  • 66. Communicating decisions clearly When a decision has been made it is important that it be clearly and promptly communicated to all those involved. The way we communicate the decision will depend on: • The type of decision/request; • The preferred communication style of those involved; • The importance or severity of the decision. Usually verbal communication – at a suitable time and place – will be all that is required.
  • 67. Element 3 – Responding to a family member's concerns about their child
  • 68. Week 10 19/9/2013 • Parents concerns • Following up on concerns • Dealing with problem situations Training package Pp 62 - 66
  • 69. Parent's concerns • • • • • Is my child eating correctly? Are they getting enough sleep? Do they have enough friends? Are they accepted by their extended family? Does their teacher like or engage enough with them? • Do they feel good about themselves?
  • 70. Parent's concerns • This can make raising a child an emotionally charged and physically draining experience.
  • 71. Parent's concerns • Parents will always have concerns over their child's welfare, particularly when they are separated during the day. • It is our role to communicate support to the families as they work through their concerns. • Some concerns may not relate to the care being provided.
  • 72. Parent's concerns • In these situations it is not possible or even appropriate to resolve their concern for them. • However, providing assistance and reassurance through the process is part of our working roles with families.
  • 73. Following up on concerns We now need to consider what happens after a concern is raised.
  • 74. Following up on concerns WHEN DEALING WITH CONCERNS IT IS IMPORTANT THAT WE - • Listen attentively and not interrupt the family member. Do not assume you know what they have to say. • Ensure body language is open and receptive. • Use active listening and clarification statements to demonstrate your interest and understanding.
  • 75. Following up on concerns BUT WHAT HAPPENS TO A CONCERN AFTER IT HAS BEEN RAISED? • You may be feeling confronted and overwhelmed. • Even though you may not be able to resolve the problem, it is still important that the family feels they have been heard.
  • 76. Following up on concerns BUT WHAT HAPPENS TO A CONCERN AFTER IT HAS BEEN RAISED? (cont) • You may need to talk it over with someone – possibly to gain some new perception on the situation or to seek some information or advice. • Remember your confidentiality requirements. • So ensuring it stays 'in house' is important – a supervisor could be an appropriate person to talk to.
  • 77. Following up on concerns BUT WHAT HAPPENS TO A CONCERN AFTER IT HAS BEEN RAISED? (cont) • Families need to feel that they can trust you to take their concerns seriously and not dismiss them with a laugh or breach confidentiality as you talk it over with another family. • If the concern is over an issue regarding the service, what steps would you need to take in line with a possible procedure?
  • 78. Following up on concerns BUT WHAT HAPPENS TO A CONCERN AFTER IT HAS BEEN RAISED? • Some concerns you will be able to assist with. • Others will require a more qualified or senior staff member (even if you feel you may be able to deal with the issue). • It is important that you become aware of what types of concerns you can deal with vs what more qualified staff are expected to deal with.
  • 79. Element 3 – Responding to a family member's concerns about their child
  • 80. Week 11 10/10/2013 • Dealing with problem situations (cont) • Looking at the big picture • Assumptions CHC08 Community Services Training Package Learning Guide Pp 66 - 72
  • 81. DEALING WITH PROBLEM SITUATIONS • Most problems are easily solved. Yet others are not. • It is not always possible to have an answer on the spot. • Some concerns may need to be taken to staff meetings or to the owner/committee of management.
  • 82. THE BIG PICTURE • Sometimes the concerns that are expressed to us are outside our area of expertise. When families grow to trust us they will share information – not always looking for a solution, but as a way to deal or understand a situation. • It is important to consider whether some of the roles you are expected to play are appropriate...
  • 83. THE BIG PICTURE • BE MINDFUL OF THE ROLES YOU TAKE ON. • Sometimes information given to us can be quite personal and has strong implications in terms of confidentiality. • For us the challenge then lies in assisting families in finding the help they need, without taking on this role ourselves.
  • 84. THE BIG PICTURE • When you talking to a parent, you do need to make them feel respected, and that they are being listened to. However, take note of the following key points 1) Acknowledge what has been said. Your role as a listener is to understand what is being said. Use any information to relate back to what is happening in the service with the child.
  • 85. THE BIG PICTURE • 2) Decide whether this is a problem that is within your level of ability or whether a supervisor or outside referral is required. • 3) Take action if the situation is do-able. This could include having other educators at the service involved – or taking it to a staff meeting for further input.
  • 86. THE BIG PICTURE • 4) Agree to assist if possible (within the guidelines of your role). Even if referred to another agency, there may be ways to assist both the family and the agency. As, once the problem has been acknowledged, it is important for everyone concerned that it is worked through to the end.
  • 87. ASSUMPTIONS • When we communicate with families, we need to be careful that we are not using an assumption based on their culture, age or linguistic background as a characteristic in the way we deal with them. Such assumptions can prove dangerous in the establishment of a partnership with families.
  • 88. ASSUMPTIONS • When families bring a concern to us, they are saying that they are trusting our judgement. They believe that we will be professional in taking their concern seriously. • Rather than feel anxious, we should feel pleased that families are comfortable enough to share and express concerns with us. • Even if we are not always in a position to answer concerns, we are in a position to assist & and listen so that they can get the help they need.
  • 89. Element 5 – Facilitate a child's transition into care
  • 90. Week 12 17/10/2013 • • • • • Choosing a centre Enrolment The first day Arrivals and departures Collaborating with families about arrivals and departures • Attitudes towards child care CHC08 Community Services Training Package Learning Guide Pp 75 - 99
  • 91. Choosing a centre A visit to the service can include • Introduction of staff (particularly relevant room staff); • A description of the program and activities offered; • What facilities the service has; • How the service can incorporate both the child's and family's individual needs.
  • 92. Choosing a centre – parent concerns • How to get their child to eat (if they are a fussy eater); • Sleep time – how much?, how they have time to individually rock a child to sleep?; • A shy child – how can they be encouraged to interact with others?; • Cultural/religious requirements.. • Toileting etc
  • 93. Choosing a centre SO WHAT IS IMPORTANT? • First impressions (both physical and emotional); • The information given ... Was it relevant to what you were asking? Did you understand it?; • The non-verbal communication between staff and your family; • What you actually saw AND felt i.e. did both the children and staff appear happy and engaged?
  • 94. Enrolment • The next stage of transition to care usually involves the enrolment process. • From a family's perspective, this is the first real chance to ask specifically how your service will meet their child's/children's needs. • This will be when much personal information about the family will be shared. • It will also provide them with the understanding of how continuity can happen between home and the service.
  • 95. Enrolment and the orientation process • One of the most important aspects of helping a child to settle is to have familiar faces around them – it is important to have what is called continuity with staff, as often a child will emotionally need to bond with someone before they can start to feel comfortable and secure.
  • 96. Enrolment and the orientation process • Delegating a primary educator for the child – in those initial first few days or weeks; • Have a notice on the front or room door to welcome them as a new family; • A phone call on the first day to advise parents as to how the child is settling; • A welcome letter to the family prior to commencement at the service; • Introducing the family to other families.
  • 97. Enrolment and the orientation process • Send home photographs – either electronically or printed, so that families can visually see how their child is progressing; • Send a certificate or first day laminated A4 poster with a photograph of their child etc • Welcome new families in the newsletter; • Make contact with families during those first few days, weeks and subsequent months to reflect on their experiences – is there anything else that could have been done to ensure the process ran more smoothly?
  • 98. The first day • Families have the power to choose the service that they feel complement their practices and beliefs; • If the service that they have chosen is truly committed to the ideal of partnerships they will feel involved in the decision making process; • This is why it is so important to have a continual flow of information sharing between both parties.
  • 99. Preparing the parent • Parents will at this stage have been given all relevant printed information; • They will have visited the service; • They will have asked questions and have had questions asked of them; • It is important to continue to work on this new relationship.
  • 100. Preparing the child • If the family is feeling confident and happy about their decision, this will transfer to the child; • However – this is also dependant on the child and their personality/past experiences in care/readiness etc • The way in which children are assisted in the transition period is also dependant on their age and what they can relate to, understand, or articulate.
  • 101. Arrivals • Leaving a child in care is not easy, and we need to recognise that it can be a very emotional time for them – even though they may have full confidence in the service. • Children need consistency in their lives – and the process of arriving at care and saying farewell to a family member should be consistent to assist them.
  • 102. Departures The following strategies can be used to assist parents when they are commencing care • Plan a relaxed morning. Pack the child's bag the night before so you are both feeling unhurried. Rushing adds to the stress of the situation. • Plan to spend some time with your child those first few mornings. Learn the names of some of the other children and toys so you can talk about them the next time your child comes.
  • 103. Departures • When it is time to leave, say goodbye confidently. • Give the child a hug and a kiss and then leave. • Lingering can make the situation worse for both parties. • Saying goodbye assists greatly with the trust element. It is not emotionally empowering to just leave without saying goodbye. • If possible, plan shorter days initially until the child has settled in.
  • 104. Collaborating with families about arrivals and departures • Developing a routine for farewells is important for family and child alike. • Familiarity and routine creates security – for both parties; • Educators must recognise the value of these rituals and support them.
  • 105. Attitudes towards child care • We need to acknowledge their feelings and help them to better understand what they are seeking for their child. We may never fully understand this because families may find it difficult to articulate.

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