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Participate in WHS processes
Recap Week 10 and Week 11

September 19th and October 10th 2013

SECTION 1

Manual handling
Steps to safe lifting
Safe...
SECTION 1
Manual handling
Steps to safe lifting
Safe bending/stretching/standing
Carrying children
MANUAL HANDLING

•
•
•
•
•

Manual handling means physically forceful
movement that ultimately requires the use of your
ba...
MANUAL HANDLING
• Damage to your back can cause headaches, neck,
shoulder, lower back and leg pain. If nerve damage
occurs...
LIFTING
• The best way to avoid a lifting injury is to avoid
lifting where ever possible.

• If an object can be wheeled, ...
STEPS TO SAFE LIFTING
BEFORE YOU LIFT
• 1)Assess the weight – if the object is too heavy or
awkward do not try and move it...
STEPS TO SAFE LIFTING
DURING THE LIFT
• 1) Bend your knees – the strongest muscles in your
body should be used for lifting...
STEPS TO SAFE LIFTING
DURING THE LIFT
• 4) Never ever twist when you carry. Use your feet to
change direction.
• 5) Lift f...
STEPS TO SAFE LIFTING
AGAIN DURING THE LIFT
• Never ever twist – TWISTING WHEN YOU LIFT IS THE
PRIME WAY TO DAMAGE YOUR SP...
STEPS TO SAFE LIFTING
DURING THE LIFT –
WAYS TO ELIMINATE BENDING AND TWISTING
After the set up of a work area …
• Adjust ...
STEPS TO SAFE LIFTING
AFTER THE LIFT • Put the load down carefully. The replacement of the
object is just as important as ...
STEPS TO SAFE LIFTING
Do not carry things when you do not need to.
Carry them (if necessary) the shortest, safest distance...
THE TEAM LIFT
• The same rules for a team lift apply (as above).
However, there are a few extra precautions when
lifting l...
THE TEAM LIFT
• The lift needs to be planned ahead, with room to
manoeuvre and the pathways cleared.
• Communication is ob...
THE TEAM LIFT
ALWAYS try to lift with someone who is roughly the
same height. If one handler is vastly taller than the
oth...
SAFE BENDING AND STRETCHING
• This is another area that can cause back damage.
• It is something we do all the time – howe...
SAFE BENDING AND STRETCHING
• All objects that you are required to lift MUST BE
WITHIN CORRECT REACHING RANGE.
• The reach...
SAFE BENDING AND STRETCHING
• The safe reach range is between your shoulders and
your hips.
• To reach higher than your sh...
SAFE BENDINGSTORAGE
SAFE AND STRETCHING

• Light, infrequently used items should be housed on
the top shelves, and heavy, ...
SAFE BENDING AND STRETCHING
SAFE STANDING
• Standing for long periods can also affect your back.
• It is important to move...
CARRYING CHILDREN
• Always carry children with care and for short
distances only.
• You should never carry children on hip...
OTHER HAZARDS
• SLIPPING AND FALLING. To avoid accidents always:
• 1. Clear high pedestrian areas such as doorways,
stairs...
OTHER HAZARDS

• 2. Use signage on moveable equipment to indicate
how many staff are required to lift e.g 2 people for a
t...
SECTION 2
Infection control and illness
Cleaning/Teaching/Planning
Contaminated waste control
Exposure to biological hazar...
early childhood education
and care services
5

http:// www.nhmrc.gov
.au/_files_nhmrc/ publications/attachments/ch55_stayi...
INFECTION CONTROL AND ILLNESS
To prevent germ spread and maintain a safe
environment the service MUST ensure the following...
INFECTION CONTROL AND ILLNESS
 Exclusion – Exclusion means that all staff, clients
and visitors with infections must stay...
CLEANING
This includes personal hygiene, cleaning of body fluid
spills, using specific cloths to avoid cross
contamination...
PERSONAL HYGIENE PRACTICES
This should have included  Hand washing
Wearing of clean clothing
Showering daily
Care of s...
WASHING HANDS
Hand washing is the primary means of reducing the
risk of spreading germ infection.
It is important that yo...
GLOVES
You need to wear gloves when your hands come into
contact with bodily fluids;
For example nose wiping;
Cleaning u...
CLEANING
CLEANING OF THE SERVICE THOROUGHLY WILL ALSO
REDUCE INFECTION.
 This should be done regularly and as a matter of...
CLEANING
REMEMBER ALWAYS KEEP CLEANING
AGENTS IN AN ADULT HEIGHT
LOCKED CUPBOARD AND MINIMISE
THE USE OF HARMFUL PRODUCTS
...
TEACHING
Services should provide information in the form of
posters, videos and leaflets etc to both parents and
staff to ...
EXCLUSION POLICY
In any workplace with a volume of persons, either staff
or clients, diseases will inevitably be spread by...
PLANNING
All services need to plan for infection control
measures, as well as for manual handling, safety and
stress reduc...
CONTAMINATED WASTE DISPOSAL

Any biological hazards must be treated with
extreme care. Biological hazards include:
 Body ...
CONTAMINATED WASTE DISPOSAL
All bins and buckets for contaminated waste
purposes should be specifically marked with
biohaz...
CONTAMINATED WASTE DISPOSAL
Sharps must be placed in designated containers.
Theses containers require particular care when...
EXPOSURE TO BIOLOGICAL HAZARDS
If you are exposed to a biological hazard, the following
steps should be taken:
 If a punc...
EXPOSURE TO BIOLOGICAL HAZARDS
If you are exposed to a biological hazard, the following
steps should be taken:
 There is ...
PERSONAL PROTECTIVE CLOTHING
These PPE would include  Sunscreen;
 Protective eye glasses/goggles;
 Gowns;
 Masks;
 Pl...
PERSONAL PROTECTIVE CLOTHING
Section 4 of the NSW Work, Health and Safety
Regulation 2011 refers to the provision of worke...
Week 12

October 17th 2013

PARTICIPATE IN THE
CONTROL OF EMERGENCY
SITUATIONS
Defining an emergency and an evacuation
R...
DEFINING AN EMERGENCY AND
EVACUATION
There are many types of emergencies that can happen
both inside and outside the workp...
FIRE AND EVACUATION
Fire can occur in all environments – internal or
external; a kitchen fire; electrical fire; explosion ...
FIRE AND EVACUATION
Ignition can be from a variety of sources; a naked
flame from a cooker, electrical spark from a faulty...
FIRE AND EVACUATION
Good fire prevention measures are the main reason that
fires in the workplace are rare events. All per...
FIRE AND EVACUATION
ACTIVITY 1
Using your iPads – look up The Guide to the
Education and care Services National Law and th...
FIRE AND EVACUATION
As an employee of the service, you are responsible for
understanding and following all of the emergenc...
FIRE AND EVACUATION
As an employee of the service, you are responsible for
understanding and following all of the emergenc...
FIRE AND EVACUATION

For those students working or volunteering at a service, are
you aware of emergency exits, fire equip...
FIRE EQUIPMENT
The Education and care Services National Regulation (41)
states that all services must have :
APPROPRIATELY...
FIRE EQUIPMENT
The dry powder fire extinguisher is very
effective on flammable liquids, electrical fires
and gases

A fire...
FIRE EQUIPMENT
When using a fire extinguisher use it in a sweeping
motion at the base of the fire. Only use an extinguishe...
FIRE EQUIPMENT
A fire blanket is a large, thickly woven, fire retardant
material which should be installed near areas wher...
FIRE EQUIPMENT
Smoke detectors must be fitted inside every room of a
service and they must be regularly checked and
The dr...
FIRE AND EVACUATION
ACTIVITY 2
Using your iPads – students are to look up a children's
service website to view a policy an...
FIRE EQUIPMENT
The general procedure in case of fire can be remembered by the
acronym:
The Remove people
The dry powder fi...
FIRE AND EVACUATION
ACTIVITY 3
Students are to refer to the RACE explanatory notes
(North Coast TAFE CHCO8 Community Servi...
CHEMICAL DANGERS
If chemicals/hazardous substances used in a service are
stored or used improperly they pose both a potent...
CHEMICAL DANGERS
CHEMICAL PRODUCT LABELS MUST SHOW:
Name of product
TheDirections for use
The dry powder fire extinguisher...
CHEMICAL STORAGE
All agents/substances must be stored at the temperature
recommended by the manufacturer. Safe storage inc...
CHEMICAL DANGERS
Students are to now complete Activity 4 (3.5) p 95

The dry powder fire extinguisher very effective on fl...
CHEMICAL SPILLAGE/SPLASHES
If a chemical agent/substance comes into contact with a
body, the chemical must be washed off a...
FIRST AID EQUIPMENT
WorkCover specifies under regulation 42:
When considering how to provide first aid, a person
The dry p...
FIRST AID EQUIPMENT
In all services with children, a first aider must be
present at all times.
The Education and Care Serv...
HUMAN THREAT
There may be times when a worker feels at risk in the
workplace due to human dangers. These dangers can
The d...
HUMAN THREAT
Outsiders/strangers can also pose a threat. ANY
suspicious persons or activities MUST be documented and
the p...
LOCK DOWN
There are very few occasions where this is required –
however a policy and procedure must be within the
service ...
LOCK DOWN
Students are extinguisher is very effective on flammable liquids,
The dry powder firenow to complete ACTIVITY 6 ...
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Transcript of "Participate in whs processes week 12"

  1. 1. Participate in WHS processes
  2. 2. Recap Week 10 and Week 11 September 19th and October 10th 2013 SECTION 1 Manual handling Steps to safe lifting Safe bending/stretching/standing Carrying children SECTION 2 Infection control and illness Cleaning/Teaching/Planning Contaminated waste control Exposure to biological hazards PPE North Coast TAFE CHCO8 Community Services Training Package HLTWHS300A Learner Guide Version 1 Pp 65 - 81
  3. 3. SECTION 1 Manual handling Steps to safe lifting Safe bending/stretching/standing Carrying children
  4. 4. MANUAL HANDLING • • • • • Manual handling means physically forceful movement that ultimately requires the use of your back: Lifting Pushing Reaching Pulling and Carrying. If these are not performed safely and correctly they can cause a range of damage to your back/spine.
  5. 5. MANUAL HANDLING • Damage to your back can cause headaches, neck, shoulder, lower back and leg pain. If nerve damage occurs then often there is tingling, loss of sensation or numbness. • Any damage done can be extremely painful, takes a long time to improve and has a nasty habit of reoccurring. You have only one spine and in some cases damage done cannot be fully repaired. • Therefore it is extremely important that you take great care of your back.
  6. 6. LIFTING • The best way to avoid a lifting injury is to avoid lifting where ever possible. • If an object can be wheeled, left in place or dealt with without it being moved – it is preferable.
  7. 7. STEPS TO SAFE LIFTING BEFORE YOU LIFT • 1)Assess the weight – if the object is too heavy or awkward do not try and move it on your own • 2)Communicate your lift – if you are lifting a child, let them know you are doing so. If you are attempting to lift an object, let those around you know so they can stay out of your way. If you are lifting with an assistant, the co-ordination and planning requires you to communicate together. • 3)Get close to what you are lifting. Place it as close as possible to your body. Do not stretch or reach.
  8. 8. STEPS TO SAFE LIFTING DURING THE LIFT • 1) Bend your knees – the strongest muscles in your body should be used for lifting. This is not your back, but your leg, buttocks and stomach muscles. By bending your knees and bracing/tightening these muscles, stress is placed on these and NOT your back. • 2) Keep your back straight • 3) Collect and keep the load close - when you are lifting and carrying it is important to keep the load as close as possible to your body. This ensures you are using the correct muscles.
  9. 9. STEPS TO SAFE LIFTING DURING THE LIFT • 4) Never ever twist when you carry. Use your feet to change direction. • 5) Lift for as short a time as possible.
  10. 10. STEPS TO SAFE LIFTING AGAIN DURING THE LIFT • Never ever twist – TWISTING WHEN YOU LIFT IS THE PRIME WAY TO DAMAGE YOUR SPINE AND INCREASE THE CHANCE OF TRAPPING AND SQUASHING NERVES IN YOUR VERTEBRAE. • Always use your feet to change direction – never, ever lift and twist.
  11. 11. STEPS TO SAFE LIFTING DURING THE LIFT – WAYS TO ELIMINATE BENDING AND TWISTING After the set up of a work area … • Adjust shelving to appropriate heights • Where possible provide adjustable work/bench/change tables • Replace manual operations with automated ones...
  12. 12. STEPS TO SAFE LIFTING AFTER THE LIFT • Put the load down carefully. The replacement of the object is just as important as the lift. So, to lower an object - reverse the safe lifting procedure. • 1) Communicate. • 2) Bend your knees. • 3) Keep your back straight. • 4) Keep the load close to your body. Until you reach as near as possible to it's final destination.
  13. 13. STEPS TO SAFE LIFTING Do not carry things when you do not need to. Carry them (if necessary) the shortest, safest distance. If it is a large or awkward object, lift in small stages. Avoid lifting for long periods and over large distances.
  14. 14. THE TEAM LIFT • The same rules for a team lift apply (as above). However, there are a few extra precautions when lifting large and difficult objects. • A larger and heavier load requires the area that it is moving - to and from – to be clear of any hazards. • Hazards include TRIP HAZARDS such as small children, rugs, toys etc and SNAG HAZARDS such as table edges or doorways.
  15. 15. THE TEAM LIFT • The lift needs to be planned ahead, with room to manoeuvre and the pathways cleared. • Communication is obviously extremely important. The person who has the best view will take charge of the lift. Usually this is the person moving in the forward direction. • This person will count (usually to 3) to pick up and put down the load and will take steps to communicate the action necessary in order to prevent accidents.
  16. 16. THE TEAM LIFT ALWAYS try to lift with someone who is roughly the same height. If one handler is vastly taller than the other then the smaller person will end up taking the majority of the load. • There is also less chance of twisting if you are both heading in the same direction. • The use of a side step motion is more stable than one person walking backwards.
  17. 17. SAFE BENDING AND STRETCHING • This is another area that can cause back damage. • It is something we do all the time – however, when weight is added to this activity it is very easy to do damage to your back. • Reaching and bending incorrectly puts strain on the spine. • Not only are you twisting your spine and compressing the vertebra, but there is also the possibility of dropping the item upon yourself.
  18. 18. SAFE BENDING AND STRETCHING • All objects that you are required to lift MUST BE WITHIN CORRECT REACHING RANGE. • The reach of each person is different, so the safe reach range is different for everyone.
  19. 19. SAFE BENDING AND STRETCHING • The safe reach range is between your shoulders and your hips. • To reach higher than your shoulder level – you need a small step ladder. • If the object is below hip height you will need to bend your knees, keeping your back straight until you can reach in the correct range. • Always use two hands to lift a heavy/awkward object towards you.
  20. 20. SAFE BENDINGSTORAGE SAFE AND STRETCHING • Light, infrequently used items should be housed on the top shelves, and heavy, infrequently used items should be ideally housed on the bottom shelves.
  21. 21. SAFE BENDING AND STRETCHING SAFE STANDING • Standing for long periods can also affect your back. • It is important to move around and if standing, ensure your knees are slightly bent and that you keep your leg, stomach and buttock muscles braced for strength. Some ways to assist are: • Using a stool to lean on and have your weight supported; • Have a foot rest to enable shifting of your posture; • Have breaks so you can sit.
  22. 22. CARRYING CHILDREN • Always carry children with care and for short distances only. • You should never carry children on hips as it twists the spine. • Always ensure children are well supported by placing one hand under their buttocks and one hand behind their back.
  23. 23. OTHER HAZARDS • SLIPPING AND FALLING. To avoid accidents always: • 1. Clear high pedestrian areas such as doorways, stairs and areas where people stand and work so there are no trip hazards;
  24. 24. OTHER HAZARDS • 2. Use signage on moveable equipment to indicate how many staff are required to lift e.g 2 people for a table; • 3. Dry wet floors as soon as possible and ensure hazard signs and/or barriers are put in place immediately.
  25. 25. SECTION 2 Infection control and illness Cleaning/Teaching/Planning Contaminated waste control Exposure to biological hazards PPE
  26. 26. early childhood education and care services 5 http:// www.nhmrc.gov .au/_files_nhmrc/ publications/attachments/ch55_staying_healthy_childcare_5th_edit pdf Staying Healthy in Child Care 5th edition Staying Healthy in Child Care 5th edition
  27. 27. INFECTION CONTROL AND ILLNESS To prevent germ spread and maintain a safe environment the service MUST ensure the following areas are attended to:  Cleaning – this refers to your personal hygiene, the washing of all hands and all areas, equipment, and surfaces in the service.  Teaching – this includes teaching staff and clients and providing information, posters and notices to encourage good hygiene practices.
  28. 28. INFECTION CONTROL AND ILLNESS  Exclusion – Exclusion means that all staff, clients and visitors with infections must stay away from the service till they are better and all who attend the service should be immunised.  Planning – Planning includes a good layout of the service, the separation of areas of high contamination such as toilets away from food preparation areas and areas accessed by small, ill or elderly clients. Ensuring sufficient staff numbers will ensure good hygiene practices occur.
  29. 29. CLEANING This includes personal hygiene, cleaning of body fluid spills, using specific cloths to avoid cross contamination between areas and routine cleaning of the service.  Good personal hygiene will not only reduce the chances of you spreading infection but also reduces the chances of you catching one!
  30. 30. PERSONAL HYGIENE PRACTICES This should have included  Hand washing Wearing of clean clothing Showering daily Care of skin abrasions or cuts Clean nails and hair.
  31. 31. WASHING HANDS Hand washing is the primary means of reducing the risk of spreading germ infection. It is important that you wash your hands frequently and thoroughly. Hands should be washed BEFORE you touch anything that might be susceptible to infection such as food, small babies, wounds etc. Hands should be washed AFTER you touch anything that may contain germs, such as body fluids, cleaning fluids, cleaning agents, dirty laundry etc
  32. 32. GLOVES You need to wear gloves when your hands come into contact with bodily fluids; For example nose wiping; Cleaning up a spill; Dealing with blood; Changing soiled sheets. ALWAYS REMEMBER TO WASH YOUR HANDS AFTER WEARING GLOVES.
  33. 33. CLEANING CLEANING OF THE SERVICE THOROUGHLY WILL ALSO REDUCE INFECTION.  This should be done regularly and as a matter of routine, on a daily/weekly basis.  Particularly when an infection has occurred or, A body spill has happened. Each service will have their own cleaning routine and specific agents to use.
  34. 34. CLEANING REMEMBER ALWAYS KEEP CLEANING AGENTS IN AN ADULT HEIGHT LOCKED CUPBOARD AND MINIMISE THE USE OF HARMFUL PRODUCTS WHEN CHILDREN ARE PRESENT.
  35. 35. TEACHING Services should provide information in the form of posters, videos and leaflets etc to both parents and staff to assist with teaching an increased awareness for infection control measures, as well as disease prevention. If a transmittable disease occurs in a service, then the staff and clients attending need to be made aware of that disease, its mode of transmission and symptoms.
  36. 36. EXCLUSION POLICY In any workplace with a volume of persons, either staff or clients, diseases will inevitably be spread by air, touch or body fluid contact. Those who are unwell particularly at the onset of any illness, should remain at home. Those who have been infected must comply with the exclusion policy of the service and remain at home until the disease is deemed non-infectious. The public health office must be informed if a notifiable disease occurs. They will give advice about exclusion/isolation requirements.
  37. 37. PLANNING All services need to plan for infection control measures, as well as for manual handling, safety and stress reduction. For infection control, this includes situating all areas of high micro-organism activities such as toilets, waste bins, laundry or sick bays away from kitchens, areas where the elderly, very young or immune deficient attend or where any medical procedures are taking place. Information about immunisation/infectious diseases/exclusion periods/notifiable diseases can be found at www.health.nsw.gov.au
  38. 38. CONTAMINATED WASTE DISPOSAL Any biological hazards must be treated with extreme care. Biological hazards include:  Body fluids  Needles and syringes  Dressings and bandages  Nappies and soiled linen
  39. 39. CONTAMINATED WASTE DISPOSAL All bins and buckets for contaminated waste purposes should be specifically marked with biohazard symbols, kept sealed and away from all persons/clients. Bags used must be strong, leak-proof and NEVER over filled. Gloves must be provided and used when dealing with such waste. These containers require particular care when using and storing.
  40. 40. CONTAMINATED WASTE DISPOSAL Sharps must be placed in designated containers. Theses containers require particular care when using & storing. Sharps include razors, syringes, needles etc. These must be in sealed, strong, leak-proof containers with hazard symbols apparent to all. Do not overfill these containers or put hands inside the container when disposing of sharps.
  41. 41. EXPOSURE TO BIOLOGICAL HAZARDS If you are exposed to a biological hazard, the following steps should be taken:  If a puncture wound, wash under running water; If bleeding allow free flow of blood;  If eye splash, rinse under flowing water;  Remove any contaminated clothing;  Inform the director/manager;  Complete an incident form;  Seek medical advice.
  42. 42. EXPOSURE TO BIOLOGICAL HAZARDS If you are exposed to a biological hazard, the following steps should be taken:  There is a 24 hour injury hotline in NSW for workers in health care, education and emergency services.  It is purely a support and referral service. If you sustain a needle stick injury whilst at work, YOU NEED TO SEEK MEDICAL ATTENTION IMMEDIATELY. 1800 804 823
  43. 43. PERSONAL PROTECTIVE CLOTHING These PPE would include  Sunscreen;  Protective eye glasses/goggles;  Gowns;  Masks;  Plastic aprons;  Helmets;  Ear muffs/plugs;  Reflective wear.
  44. 44. PERSONAL PROTECTIVE CLOTHING Section 4 of the NSW Work, Health and Safety Regulation 2011 refers to the provision of workers and use of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE). Where the health and safety of the staff is at risk, all staff must be provided with adequate and sufficient PPE. The equipment must be well stored, maintained and marked so it can be located by all. Staff must be trained in its use and its limitations. The PPE must reflect the activities of the service.
  45. 45. Week 12 October 17th 2013 PARTICIPATE IN THE CONTROL OF EMERGENCY SITUATIONS Defining an emergency and an evacuation Reviewing fire/emergency equipment In the event of a fire – procedure  Chemical dangers First aid equipment Human threats Evacuations and lock downs North Coast TAFE CHCO8 Community Services Training Package HLTWHS300A Learner Guide Version 1 Pp 82 - 99
  46. 46. DEFINING AN EMERGENCY AND EVACUATION There are many types of emergencies that can happen both inside and outside the workplace: Fire; Explosion; Gas leak; Bomb threat; Chemical spill; Flood; Human threat. Although rare–these occurrences MUST be planned for.
  47. 47. FIRE AND EVACUATION Fire can occur in all environments – internal or external; a kitchen fire; electrical fire; explosion or a bushfire. The 3 requirements for a fire to start are Ignition source – heat, flames, sparks; Fuel – solid, liquid or gas; Oxygen – air or chemical reactions.
  48. 48. FIRE AND EVACUATION Ignition can be from a variety of sources; a naked flame from a cooker, electrical spark from a faulty appliance or a glowing cigarette butt. Fuel can be anything that burns – paper; wood; carpet; clothing, curtains etc. The air we breathe is 21% oxygen so fire burns well in air and as it burns uses up the oxygen.
  49. 49. FIRE AND EVACUATION Good fire prevention measures are the main reason that fires in the workplace are rare events. All persons in the workplace are responsible for ensuring all fire prevention measures are followed and fire hazards are spotted and removed. NSW WorkCover legislation states that the employer of a service must ensure that: 1) The evacuation procedure is safe, rapid and effective; 2) Emergency communication and first aid equipment is sufficient and available; 3) Evacuation arrangements are displayed and practiced (and documented). 4) An evacuation co-ordinator is appointed.
  50. 50. FIRE AND EVACUATION ACTIVITY 1 Using your iPads – look up The Guide to the Education and care Services National Law and the Education and Care National Regulations 2011 to find out about emergency procedures/evacuations. The index will assist you to find the relevant section. Q. How many evacuations must be practised each year?
  51. 51. FIRE AND EVACUATION As an employee of the service, you are responsible for understanding and following all of the emergency procedures. All new staff should be given information about 1) The location of extinguishers, hoses, blankets and fire exits; 2) Where the evacuation point is; 3) Where the first aid kit is located. You will be required to take part in any practice evacuation and know how and what fire fighting equipment to use in case of an emergency.
  52. 52. FIRE AND EVACUATION As an employee of the service, you are responsible for understanding and following all of the emergency procedures. All new staff should be given information about 1) The location of extinguishers, hoses, blankets and fire exits; 2) Where the evacuation point is; 3) Where the first aid kit is located. You will be required to take part in any practice evacuation and know how and what fire fighting equipment to use in case of an emergency.
  53. 53. FIRE AND EVACUATION For those students working or volunteering at a service, are you aware of emergency exits, fire equipment, evacuation procedures, first aid kit locations and assembly points?
  54. 54. FIRE EQUIPMENT The Education and care Services National Regulation (41) states that all services must have : APPROPRIATELY LOCATED FIRE EXTINGUISHERS AND SMOKE DETECTORS AND A FIRE BLANKET ADJACENT TO COOKING FACILITIES. FIRE EXTINGUISHERS ARE USUALLY LOCATED OUTSIDE EACH ROOM IN THE CORRIDOR. The fire brigade or fire expert from a specialist company will advise a service as to what equipment to purchase. The equipment should be checked every 6 months. The fire brigade will usually provide staff training on the use of equipment.
  55. 55. FIRE EQUIPMENT The dry powder fire extinguisher is very effective on flammable liquids, electrical fires and gases A fire blanket covers a fire to cut supply of oxygen or can be used to wrap a person whose clothes are on fire. CO2 fire extinguisher– for computer/electrical fires http://www.kingfire.com.au/
  56. 56. FIRE EQUIPMENT When using a fire extinguisher use it in a sweeping motion at the base of the fire. Only use an extinguisher The dry powder fire extinguisher isthe alarm, cleared theliquids, electrical fires and The when you have raisedis very effective on flammable liquids, electrical fires and dry powder fire extinguisher very effective on flammable immediate gases: gases: area – and ensured that the fire is manageable. Never tackle a fire that you feel is unmanageable. Ensure your own safety and those you are responsible for, before tackling any fire.
  57. 57. FIRE EQUIPMENT A fire blanket is a large, thickly woven, fire retardant material which should be installed near areas where The dry powderor work involving open flames occurs. The cooking fire extinguisher is very effective on flammable liquids, electrical fires and dry powder fire extinguisher is very effective on flammable liquids, electrical fires and gases: gases: They are used to remove the fire's oxygen either by laying them over a burning object such as a pan or pot or for wrapping up a burning person tightly when you 'STOP DROP AND ROLL'' – stop, drop and roll is the technique used when extinguishing flames on a person.
  58. 58. FIRE EQUIPMENT Smoke detectors must be fitted inside every room of a service and they must be regularly checked and The dry powder fire extinguisher is very effective on flammable liquids, electrical fires and The maintained.extinguisher is very effective on flammable liquids, electrical fires and dry powder fire They should not be placed above cookers or gases: gases: areas where controlled radiant heat/smoke regularly rises. Fire alarm systems vary. There is usually one located within each room within a service. You should always know the location of a fire alarm, fire exits and smoke detectors within the service you are working or volunteering in..
  59. 59. FIRE AND EVACUATION ACTIVITY 2 Using your iPads – students are to look up a children's service website to view a policy and procedure that relates to emergency evacuations. Discuss.
  60. 60. FIRE EQUIPMENT The general procedure in case of fire can be remembered by the acronym: The Remove people The dry powder fire extinguisher is very effective on flammable liquids, electrical fires and dry powder fire extinguisher is very effective on flammable liquids, electrical fires and gases: gases: Alert the Fire brigade on 000 and nearby staff Confine the fire and smoke. Close windows and doors if possible. Extinguish or control fire without taking risks.
  61. 61. FIRE AND EVACUATION ACTIVITY 3 Students are to refer to the RACE explanatory notes (North Coast TAFE CHCO8 Community Services Training Package HLTWHS300A Learner Guide Version 1 Pp 88 – 91) and then complete activity 3 (3.3).
  62. 62. CHEMICAL DANGERS If chemicals/hazardous substances used in a service are stored or used improperly they pose both a potential The dry powder fire safety hazard. effective on flammable liquids, electrical fires and The health and extinguisher is very effective on flammable liquids, electrical fires and dry powder fire extinguisher is very gases: gases: Before using an agent read the label for directions, safety precautions and wear gloves.
  63. 63. CHEMICAL DANGERS CHEMICAL PRODUCT LABELS MUST SHOW: Name of product TheDirections for use The dry powder fire extinguisher is very effective on flammable liquids, electrical fires and dry powder fire extinguisher is very effective on flammable liquids, electrical fires and gases: gases: List of ingredients Expiry date Hazards of use First aid directions Safety information Contact details of supplier and manufacturer All hazardous substances MUST also have an MSDS (Material Safety Data Sheet).
  64. 64. CHEMICAL STORAGE All agents/substances must be stored at the temperature recommended by the manufacturer. Safe storage includes The keeping agents/substances: The dry powder fire extinguisher is very effective on flammable liquids, electrical fires and dry powder fire extinguisher is very effective on flammable liquids, electrical fires and gases: gases: At adult height, in locked cupboards with warning notices on the doors. With space left between bottles to reduce mixing of spills. At a safe distance from any heat source. Where there is no contact with food. In the original container or in a designated container with the original packaging information.
  65. 65. CHEMICAL DANGERS Students are to now complete Activity 4 (3.5) p 95 The dry powder fire extinguisher very effective on flammable liquids, electrical fires and The dry powder fire extinguisher isis very effective on flammable liquids, electrical fires and gases: gases:
  66. 66. CHEMICAL SPILLAGE/SPLASHES If a chemical agent/substance comes into contact with a body, the chemical must be washed off as quickly as The dry powder using cool, running wateron flammable liquids, electrical fires and The possible fire extinguisher is very effective on flammable liquids, electrical fires and dry powder fire extinguisher is very effective for 20 minutes. gases: gases: If an incident occurs both the MSDS sheet and the poisons information line will provide information on first aid treatment. If any ingestion of a chemical occurs, the poisons information service must be contacted for first aid treatment. POISONS INFORMATION – 13 11 26
  67. 67. FIRST AID EQUIPMENT WorkCover specifies under regulation 42: When considering how to provide first aid, a person The dry powder fire extinguisher is very effective on flammable liquids, electrical fires and The conducting a businessis very effective on flammable liquids, electrical fires and dry powder fire extinguisher or undertaking must consider all gases: gases: relevant matters including: * The nature of the work being carried out; * The nature of the hazards at the workplace; * The size, location and nature of the workplace; * The number and composition of the workers at the workplace.
  68. 68. FIRST AID EQUIPMENT In all services with children, a first aider must be present at all times. The Education and Care Services National Regulations The dry powder fire extinguisher is very effective on flammable liquids, electrical fires and The dry powder fire extinguisher is very effective on flammable liquids, electrical fires and (Regulation 136) states that one person on the grounds gases: gases: has first aid, as well as emergency asthma and anaphylaxis training. ACTIVITY 5 (3.6) p 97 Let us look up the following website to find a first aid kit for a service with 39 children. Www.safeworkaustralia.gov.au/sites/SWA - LOOK UP FIRST AID
  69. 69. HUMAN THREAT There may be times when a worker feels at risk in the workplace due to human dangers. These dangers can The dry powder theextinguisher issudden andon flammable liquids, electrical a The come in fire extinguisher is very effective on flammable liquids, electrical fires and dry powder fire form of a very effective unexpected assault or fires and gases: gases: persistent and known threat. In all cases maintaining the safety of all the service is a priority. With persistent offenders, strategies can be instituted and staff informed and trained in procedures to deal with the threat. This can include situations where the service needs to utilize the services of the police or other legal means.
  70. 70. HUMAN THREAT Outsiders/strangers can also pose a threat. ANY suspicious persons or activities MUST be documented and the police involved if there is a perceived threat. The dry powder fire extinguisher is very effective on flammable liquids, electrical fires and The dry powder fire extinguisher is very effective on flammable liquids, electrical fires and To gases: reduce human threats, services should: gases: NEVER leave a single staff member alone. Train staff to respond to threatening situations. Ensure there are efficient staff to client ratios. Ensure all security gates/locks are functional and are used properly. Ensure doorways, toilets and car parks are well lit and visible. Use alarms and locks in high risk areas.
  71. 71. LOCK DOWN There are very few occasions where this is required – however a policy and procedure must be within the service emergency plan. The dry powder fire extinguisher is very effective on flammable liquids, electrical fires and The dry powder fire extinguisher is very effective on flammable liquids, electrical fires and gases: gases: Lock down arises if there is an emergency outside the service and the people within the service require protection. The service is closed to outsiders and is opened for emergency services and police only, until the crisis has passed. Use of telephones is restricted to emergency contact and all access if locked.
  72. 72. LOCK DOWN Students are extinguisher is very effective on flammable liquids, The dry powder firenow to complete ACTIVITY 6 (3.7) p99 electrical fires and The dry powder fire extinguisher is very effective on flammable liquids, electrical fires and gases: gases:
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