Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Particpate in whs processes week 10
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Introducing the official SlideShare app

Stunning, full-screen experience for iPhone and Android

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

Particpate in whs processes week 10

143
views

Published on

Published in: Health & Medicine, Business

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
143
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
5
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Participate in WHS processes
  • 2. Section 2 Weeks 8 – 11 Supporting others in working safely
  • 3. Recap Week 9 September 12th 2013 The role of the Workcover Authority of NSW North Coast TAFE CHCO8 Community Services Training Package HLTWHS300A Learner Guide Version 1 Pp 59 - 65
  • 4. The WorkCover Authority of NSW The WorkCover Authority of NSW manages workplace safety, injury management and workers compensation systems. It is responsible for ensuring compliance with Work Health and Safety legislation and ensures that worker compensation and rehabilitation procedures are carried out correctly.
  • 5. The WorkCover Authority of NSW • Promotes the prevention of injury and diseases at the workplace and the development of healthy and safe workplaces • Promotes the prompt, efficient and effective management of injuries to people at work The WorkCover Authority:
  • 6. The WorkCover Authority of NSW • Ensures the efficient operation of workers compensation insurance arrangements • Ensures the appropriate co-ordination of arrangements for the administration of schemes to which the workers compensation legislation or the work health and safety legislation relates to. The WorkCover Authority: (cont)
  • 7. The WorkCover Authority of NSW • Inspect the workplace to ascertain compliance with the Work Health and Safety Act • Issue notices and fines. WorkCover inspectors have the power to :
  • 8. Grievances Most conflicts are resolved with effective consultation between management and workers. There are times, however, when WHS disputes between workers and employees will arise and will be difficult to resolve. They may take some time and a measure of compromise to find a solution. • On occasion, mediators are necessary to give an impartial judgement on the situation. Any complaints need to be dealt with in an open, fair and effective manner. All complaints should be regarded seriously, documented and dealt with either formally or informally.
  • 9. Training WHS training serves several purposes in the workplace. • If employees are equipped with WHS knowledge there are fewer accidents and incidents. • Knowledge raises the level of awareness of risks and hazards and creates a better understanding as to why safety and health procedures must be followed.
  • 10. Training All new employees should undergo WHS training. This includes: • All workplace health and safety procedures. • Reporting of hazards to management. • Manual handling training. • Recording and documenting accident and incident information. • Where and how to access further WHS information. • Workers compensation issues and claims.
  • 11. Standard operating procedures Also known as Safe Work Procedures and Work Method Statements, standard operating procedures outline the PPE (personal protective equipment) required for • The task at hand • The correct sequence of steps • The potential hazards or risks that could be encountered at each step • How to do it – the actual operating procedure.
  • 12. Designated persons and hierarchy of control WHS legislation requires that hazards and risks be controlled in a systematic manner. If it is NOT practical to eliminate the risks, then the risk needs to be reduced using control measures. • Substitution • Engineering controls • Administrative controls. • Refer to Hierarchy of Hazard/Control Chart (p63)
  • 13. Week 10 and Week 11  September 19th and October 10th 2013 SECTION 1  Manual handling  Steps to safe lifting  Safe bending/stretching/standing  Carrying children SECTION 2  Infection control and illness  Cleaning/Teaching/Planning  Contaminated waste control  Exposure to biological hazards  PPE North Coast TAFE CHCO8 Community Services Training Package HLTWHS300A Learner Guide Version 1 Pp 65 - 81
  • 14. SECTION 1 Manual handling Steps to safe lifting Safe bending/stretching/standing Carrying children WEEK 10 19/9/2013
  • 15. MANUAL HANDLING What is manual handling?
  • 16. MANUAL HANDLING Manual handling means physically forceful movement that ultimately requires the use of your back: • Lifting • Pushing • Reaching • Pulling • and Carrying. If these are not performed safely and correctly they can cause a range of damage to your back/spine.
  • 17. MANUAL HANDLING This can impact not only on your ability to work, but your lifestyle as well. Some jobs require more physical work than others; however all jobs require some degree of back/spine involvement. Back injury can have far reaching and long lasting effects, therefore, to protect your spine is vitally important. • In the area of children's services the manual handling requirements are large.
  • 18. MANUAL HANDLING • Simple passive activities such as sitting, if done in the wrong sized chair, over a period of time, will cause back damage to occur. • Just because children are small, constant lifting and bending, if undertaken in the wrong manner is still extremely hazardous on the spine. • All jobs in all services require back care to be taken seriously and manual handling is to be done correctly at all times.
  • 19. MANUAL HANDLING • The function of your spine is to support your skeleton and encase the spinal cord containing your nerves. • Damage to your back can cause a range of symptoms from dull aching pain to acute crippling pain. • It can affect the spinal bones, the discs between the bones, the muscles attached to the spine and the nerves that travel down the spinal column.
  • 20. MANUAL HANDLING • Damage to your back can cause headaches, neck, shoulder, lower back and leg pain. If nerve damage occurs then often there is tingling, loss of sensation or numbness. • Any damage done can be extremely painful, takes a long time to improve and has a nasty habit of reoccurring. You have only one spine and in some cases damage done cannot be fully repaired. • Therefore it is extremely important that you take great care of your back.
  • 21. LIFTING Lifting may include - • Picking up toys • Helping a person up from a chair • Picking up a baby, toddler or preschool aged child. • It does not matter how heavy the object – what is important is that when you are lifting it must be done in the correct manner.
  • 22. LIFTING • The best way to avoid a lifting injury is to avoid lifting where ever possible. • If an object can be wheeled, left in place or dealt with without it being moved – it is preferable.
  • 23. LIFTING • Students are to complete Activity 1 (2.7) p 67.
  • 24. LIFTING • Now lets have a look at the following DVD which is from Kindergarten Parents Victoria and relates to lifting children in a children's centre. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vDxQMy7RLLY
  • 25. LIFTING • Information fact sheet - Looking after your back Kids Health Westmead Hospital and use it as a guide to safe lifting. • In a simulated situation, using equipment in the playroom, let us demonstrate some safe lifting techniques.
  • 26. STEPS TO SAFE LIFTING BEFORE YOU LIFT • 1)Assess the weight – if the object is too heavy or awkward do not try and move it on your own • 2)Communicate your lift – if you are lifting a child, let them know you are doing so. If you are attempting to lift an object, let those around you know so they can stay out of your way. If you are lifting with an assistant, the co-ordination and planning requires you to communicate together. • 3)Get close to what you are lifting. Place it as close as possible to your body. Do not stretch or reach.
  • 27. STEPS TO SAFE LIFTING DURING THE LIFT • 1) Bend your knees – the strongest muscles in your body should be used for lifting. This is not your back, but your leg, buttocks and stomach muscles. By bending your knees and bracing/tightening these muscles, stress is placed on these and NOT your back. • 2) Keep your back straight • 3) Collect and keep the load close - when you are lifting and carrying it is important to keep the load as close as possible to your body. This ensures you are using the correct muscles.
  • 28. STEPS TO SAFE LIFTING DURING THE LIFT • 4) Never ever twist when you carry. Use your feet to change direction. • 5) Lift for as short a time as possible.
  • 29. STEPS TO SAFE LIFTING AGAIN DURING THE LIFT • Never ever twist – TWISTING WHEN YOU LIFT IS THE PRIME WAY TO DAMAGE YOUR SPINE AND INCREASE THE CHANCE OF TRAPPING AND SQUASHING NERVES IN YOUR VERTEBRAE. • Always use your feet to change direction – never, ever lift and twist.
  • 30. STEPS TO SAFE LIFTING DURING THE LIFT – WAYS TO ELIMINATE BENDING AND TWISTING After the set up of a work area … • Adjust shelving to appropriate heights • Where possible provide adjustable work/bench/change tables • Replace manual operations with automated ones...
  • 31. STEPS TO SAFE LIFTING AFTER THE LIFT - • Put the load down carefully. The replacement of the object is just as important as the lift. So, to lower an object - reverse the safe lifting procedure. • 1) Communicate. • 2) Bend your knees. • 3) Keep your back straight. • 4) Keep the load close to your body. Until you reach as near as possible to it's final destination.
  • 32. Do not carry things when you do not need to. Carry them (if necessary) the shortest, safest distance. If it is a large or awkward object, lift in small stages. Avoid lifting for long periods and over large distances. STEPS TO SAFE LIFTING
  • 33. STEPS TO SAFE LIFTING • Students to complete Activity 2 (2.8) p70.
  • 34. PRACTISING THE 12 STEPS Activity 3 (2.9) p72. • Now, using equipment to assist you, write down those 12 steps until they are clear in your mind. Remember that there is a safe lift assessment associated with this unit which you are required to complete competently in order to pass this unit.
  • 35. THE TEAM LIFT • The same rules for a team lift apply (as above). However, there are a few extra precautions when lifting large and difficult objects. • A larger and heavier load requires the area that it is moving - to and from – to be clear of any hazards. • Hazards include TRIP HAZARDS such as small children, rugs, toys etc and SNAG HAZARDS such as table edges or doorways.
  • 36. THE TEAM LIFT • The lift needs to be planned ahead, with room to manoeuvre and the pathways cleared. • Communication is obviously extremely important. The person who has the best view will take charge of the lift. Usually this is the person moving in the forward direction. • This person will count (usually to 3) to pick up and put down the load and will take steps to communicate the action necessary in order to prevent accidents.
  • 37. THE TEAM LIFT ALWAYS try to lift with someone who is roughly the same height. If one handler is vastly taller than the other then the smaller person will end up taking the majority of the load. • There is also less chance of twisting if you are both heading in the same direction. • The use of a side step motion is more stable than one person walking backwards.
  • 38. SAFE BENDING AND STRETCHING • This is another area that can cause back damage. • It is something we do all the time – however, when weight is added to this activity it is very easy to do damage to your back. • Reaching and bending incorrectly puts strain on the spine. • Not only are you twisting your spine and compressing the vertebra, but there is also the possibility of dropping the item upon yourself. SAFE BENDING AND STRETCHINGSAFE BENDING AND STRETCHINGSAFE BENDING AND STRETCHING
  • 39. SAFE BENDING AND STRETCHING • All objects that you are required to lift MUST BE WITHIN CORRECT REACHING RANGE. • The reach of each person is different, so the safe reach range is different for everyone. SAFE BENDING AND STRETCHINGSAFE BENDING AND STRETCHINGSAFE BENDING AND STRETCHING
  • 40. SAFE BENDING AND STRETCHING • The safe reach range is between your shoulders and your hips. • To reach higher than your shoulder level – you need a small step ladder. • If the object is below hip height you will need to bend your knees, keeping your back straight until you can reach in the correct range. • Always use two hands to lift a heavy/awkward object towards you. SAFE BENDING AND STRETCHINGSAFE BENDING AND STRETCHINGSAFE BENDING AND STRETCHING
  • 41. SAFE BENDING AND STRETCHING • All surfaces that you work on, or at, should be around the average hip height. There should also be ways to adjust this height – if necessary – using step ladders/small foot stools etc • Shelving and storage – items used frequently should always be stored at waist level. Why? • 1) It assists you when you are in a hurry and do not take the time to get steps. You can collect the item without dropping or damaging it. • 2) It makes the working process faster and more efficient. SAFE BENDING AND STRETCHINGSAFE BENDING AND STRETCHINGSAFE BENDING AND STRETCHING
  • 42. SAFE BENDING AND STRETCHING • Light, infrequently used items should be housed on the top shelves, and heavy, infrequently used items should be ideally housed on the bottom shelves. SAFE BENDING AND STRETCHINGSAFE BENDING AND STRETCHINGSAFE STORAGE
  • 43. SAFE BENDING AND STRETCHING • Activity 4 (2.11) p 74. Bending and stretching in the workplace.
  • 44. SAFE BENDING AND STRETCHING • Standing for long periods can also affect your back. • It is important to move around and if standing, ensure your knees are slightly bent and that you keep your leg, stomach and buttock muscles braced for strength. Some ways to assist are: • Using a stool to lean on and have your weight supported; • Have a foot rest to enable shifting of your posture; • Have breaks so you can sit. SAFE BENDING AND STRETCHINGSAFE BENDING AND STRETCHINGSAFE STANDING
  • 45. CARRYING CHILDREN • Always carry children with care and for short distances only. • You should never carry children on hips as it twists the spine. • Always ensure children are well supported by placing one hand under their buttocks and one hand behind their back.
  • 46. OTHER HAZARDS • SLIPPING AND FALLING. To avoid accidents always: • 1. Clear high pedestrian areas such as doorways, stairs and areas where people stand and work so there are no trip hazards;
  • 47. OTHER HAZARDS • 2. Use signage on moveable equipment to indicate how many staff are required to lift e.g 2 people for a table; • 3. Dry wet floors as soon as possible and ensure hazard signs and/or barriers are put in place immediately.
  • 48. OTHER HAZARDS • SLIPPING AND FALLING. To avoid accidents always: • 1. Clear high pedestrian areas such as doorways, stairs and areas where people stand and work so there are no trip hazards; • 2. Use signage on moveable equipment to indicate how many staff are required to lift e.g 2 people for a table; • 3. Dry wet floors as soon as possible and ensure hazard signs and/or barriers are put in place immediately.
  • 49. LIFTING • Finally, before we start lifting, let's have a look at the following 6 part DVD which is from Kindergarten Parents Victoria and relates to ALL AREAS of lifting children in a children's centre. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vDxQMy7RLLY
  • 50. LIFTING Activity 5 • Down in the playroom, we will be practising some safe lifting – using the techniques that we have studied in class today. • Students will be required to practise • 1) an individual lift and • 2) a team lift. • Remember your 12 steps!