CHCCOM201C
Communicate with people
accessing the services of the
organisation –
Week 13

22/10/2103

Recap Weeks 2 - 12
Element 1 – Communicate
appropriately with clients of
the organisation
1. Communicating with clients
Week 2
Defining Communication 23/7/2013

Mostly we don’t stop to think about how we
communi...
Communication
Communication skills are so important within the
Community Services Industry
We need to be able to relate ...
Week 3
Types of Communication
30/7/2013

Communication can be verbal and non-verbal
Usually we refer to verbal communica...
Week 4
Models of Communication
6/8/2013

Models of communication are:
Communicator – this is the initiator or sender of ...
Models of Communication
•Models of communication are:
Feedback – this is provided by the receiver and lets the
sender kno...
Communicate information in a
culturally appropriate way
It is important that our interactions and strategies do not
exclu...
Communicate information in a
culturally appropriate way
Non-verbal communication and culture—Gestures,
movements, tone of...
Communicate information in a
culturally appropriate way
Eye contact—There are many cultural variations of what
eye contac...
Communicate information in a
culturally appropriate way
Cultural variation in interpretation of social issues—For
example...
Communication
To be an effective communicator we need to be very
aware of our own communication strengths and
weaknesses
...
Week 5 13/8/2013
Effective Communication
This occurs when the message sent is received as the
sender intended it.
This i...
Barriers to effective communication
There are lots of behaviours that we all engage in that
have a negative impact on com...
Barriers to effective communication
Diverting would be the most commonly used
roadblock to effective communication
Diver...
Week 6 20/8/2013
Components of good listening
Giving full attention to the speaker
Putting other thoughts temporarily as...
Components of good listening
(cont)
Listening to all the other person has to say, rather than
tuning out halfway through ...
Components of good listening
SPEED EYE-CONTACT
GESTURE AND POSTURE....The movements we make
with our head and hands can...
Components of good listening
SPEED EYE-CONTACT
GESTURE AND POSTURE....The movements we make
with our head and hands can...
Components of good listening
S

Sit or position yourself so you can see
the person

O

Open body language

L

Lean towards...
Components of good listening
Communicating to clarify meaning
When we want to learn more about what
someone is telling us...
Components of good listening
Communicating to clarify meaning
Closed questions can be answered in a few words
or with a y...
2. Communication Skills –

Week 7
Client confidentiality and privacy
27/8/2013
Maintaining Confidentiality
There are certainly times when staff discussion
must take place regarding children/families bu...
Maintaining Confidentiality
There will also be occasions when ALL STAFF are required to
know about certain matters.
Can yo...
Maintaining Confidentiality
You may not always be told certain information is
deemed confidential
You must assume that ALL...
Exceptions to the rule of confidentiality
1) Making records available to the police if they have a
warrant to inspect docu...
2. Communication Skills –

Week 8

3/9/2013

RESPECTING DIVERSITY
AVOIDING DISCRIMMINATION IN
COMMUNICATION
Respecting diversity
PEOPLE ARE ALL DIFFERENT!
In the workplace you will come across people who are
very different from yo...
Respecting diversity (cont)
Differences are due to:
1) Our own individual preferences;
2) Our family backgrounds;
3) Our o...
Respecting diversity (cont)
Egocentric and ethnocentric worldviews
1) We see what happens around us from our own point of
...
Respecting diversity (cont)
Egocentric and ethnocentric worldviews
The reality is that people have
many different points o...
Respecting diversity (cont)
HOW MUCH DO YOU FEEL YOUR VIEWS ON
DIVERSITY AND, HOW YOU ACCEPT DIFFERENCES IN
OTHER PEOPLE C...
AVOIDING
DISCRIMMINATION
IN
COMMUNICATION
Avoiding discrimination in communication
(Being treated unfairly because of who they are)

Discrimination happens in diffe...
Avoiding discrimination in communication
(cont)

Religious belief – no vegetarian alternatives were
provided to meet the r...
Avoiding discrimination in communication
(cont)

In our day to day communication, we can avoid being
discriminatory by pay...
3. Accessing relevant information –

Week 9

10/9/2013

GATHERING INFORMATION FROM A
SERVICE
GATHERING INFORMATION FROM A SERVICE

Pamphlets
Information booklets
Information videos
Websites
Policy documents
3. Accessing relevant information –

Week 10

17/9/2013

Providing appropriate referrals Pp 31 – 35 CHCCCOM201C Learner Gu...
Responding to messages appropriately
 Types of messages
 Written messages
 Verbal messages
 Messages reaching the des...
Responding to messages appropriately
 Types of messages

A variety of methods of transferring and receiving
messages exi...
Element 2 – Present a positive
image of the service to the
public
COMMUNICATING WITH THE PUBLIC
When working in a community
service agency we become
representatives of that agency.

COMMUNICATING WITH THE PUBLIC
When answering the phone in a work setting,
it is important to give a caller the following
i...
COMMUNICATING WITH THE PUBLIC
Using names

When speaking to clients – especially during
the first contact, it is importan...
COMMUNICATING WITH THE PUBLIC
Explaining processes

When working with clients it is also
important to give them details a...
COMMUNICATING WITH THE PUBLIC
Being courteous even when the client isn't

This is quite a common occurrence when
working ...
COMMUNICATING WITH THE PUBLIC
Personal presentation


Each service will have a code of dress.

This can often be listed w...
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Communicate recap wk 13

  1. 1. CHCCOM201C Communicate with people accessing the services of the organisation – Week 13 22/10/2103 Recap Weeks 2 - 12
  2. 2. Element 1 – Communicate appropriately with clients of the organisation
  3. 3. 1. Communicating with clients Week 2 Defining Communication 23/7/2013 Mostly we don’t stop to think about how we communicate with others. We simply assume that we just know how to do it However we don’t always get the message across Communication is a complex process with the potential for things to go wrong (miscommunication)
  4. 4. Communication Communication skills are so important within the Community Services Industry We need to be able to relate to our clients, colleagues and other community agencies in the best possible way Communicating with clients, their families, colleagues and other organisation can be done by; Face to face Over the phone Individually or within a group setting At a meeting or conference By writing (e-mails, letters, memos, reports etc)
  5. 5. Week 3 Types of Communication 30/7/2013 Communication can be verbal and non-verbal Usually we refer to verbal communication as relating to the words that are said Non-verbal communication includes all the messages that are sent not using words; What are some forms of non-verbal communication?
  6. 6. Week 4 Models of Communication 6/8/2013 Models of communication are: Communicator – this is the initiator or sender of the message Messages – combinations of verbal and non-verbal signs and symbols that we use as a means to communicate Channels – these are our senses through which we send and receive messages – vision, hearing, touch, taste & smell
  7. 7. Models of Communication •Models of communication are: Feedback – this is provided by the receiver and lets the sender know the reaction to the message ie. Is the message understood Noise – in the context of interpersonal communication, noise is a distortion, interruption or loss of the intended meaning of a message. Noise can be physical but it can also be emotional, idealogical or attitudinal. That is, our own thoughts, feelings, attitudes, values, beliefs and world view can affect how we listen to or hear the message being communicated. .
  8. 8. Communicate information in a culturally appropriate way It is important that our interactions and strategies do not exclude any individual. Different cultures communicate in particular ways These differences are obvious in how they greet others, how they take turns when speaking, how they address each other, what is said and how they express their feelings and react to the feelings of others To work effectively and to take into consideration the culture of colleagues and clients, we need to be aware of:
  9. 9. Communicate information in a culturally appropriate way Non-verbal communication and culture—Gestures, movements, tone of voice, eye contact and facial expressions vary in meaning across cultures. In India, for example, shaking the head from side to side is an indication of agreement rather than disagreement which is how we understand it in Australia. Personal space—Distancing oneself or getting closer to clients may be misinterpreted as coldness or inappropriately intimate or pushy. The gender of the client and worker is also an important factor in how personal space is utilised.
  10. 10. Communicate information in a culturally appropriate way Eye contact—There are many cultural variations of what eye contact means. In some cultures such as Mexican, Japanese, Korean and many indigenous Australian cultures, avoidance of eye contact means respect. This is sometimes misinterpreted as not listening or being rude  Use of silence—Different cultures use silences differently. Arabic people often regard silence as a time to collect private thoughts; Russians, Spanish and French might regard silence as indicating a common agreement or shared view; while in Asian cultures silence is often used as a sign of respect
  11. 11. Communicate information in a culturally appropriate way Cultural variation in interpretation of social issues—For example, people might have a different interpretation of issues such as what constitutes a marriage or a marriage separation. In some cultures a woman may regard herself as not being separated from her husband, even though the husband has left, simply because they are still legally married. Cultural responses to emotions—Different cultures have different rules about how to respond to emotions. Touching the hand of someone crying might be acceptable in our culture but in others, offering tissues or a glass of water could be adequate.
  12. 12. Communication To be an effective communicator we need to be very aware of our own communication strengths and weaknesses You will need to regularly reflect on the interactions you have with clients, co-workers and friends to assess what works and what barriers might be present
  13. 13. Week 5 13/8/2013 Effective Communication This occurs when the message sent is received as the sender intended it. This is achieved by the content of the message (verbal) and the non-verbal cues matching each other This means the messages are congruent – a match between verbal and non-verbal If we want to be effective communicators it is important that we send messages that are congruent
  14. 14. Barriers to effective communication There are lots of behaviours that we all engage in that have a negative impact on communication Following are behaviours that inhibit effective communication criticising (blaming) praising name calling (labelling) diagnosing ordering moralising excessive questioning threatening advising diverting reassuring logical argument
  15. 15. Barriers to effective communication Diverting would be the most commonly used roadblock to effective communication Diverting occurs when you change the conversation to something you want to talk about i.e. Changing the subject
  16. 16. Week 6 20/8/2013 Components of good listening Giving full attention to the speaker Putting other thoughts temporarily aside in order to concentrate on what is being said. Resisting distractions. Not just listening to the words but 'tuning in' to the feelings behind them – the feelings are just as important as the words themselves. Giving non-verbal signals which indicate attention and interest (e.g nods, eye contact, appropriate facial expressions)
  17. 17. Components of good listening (cont) Listening to all the other person has to say, rather than tuning out halfway through to plan your response. Being able to suspend making an opinion or judgement about what is being said and concentrating on what is being said and NOT your reaction to it. Checking that the message you received is the one that the sender intended by using questions and checking skills.
  18. 18. Components of good listening SPEED EYE-CONTACT GESTURE AND POSTURE....The movements we make with our head and hands can influence the communication we have with people.
  19. 19. Components of good listening SPEED EYE-CONTACT GESTURE AND POSTURE....The movements we make with our head and hands can influence the communication we have with people.
  20. 20. Components of good listening S Sit or position yourself so you can see the person O Open body language L Lean towards the person V Verbalise agreement – ummm, really? etc E Eye contact
  21. 21. Components of good listening Communicating to clarify meaning When we want to learn more about what someone is telling us or want to make sure that we know what they are saying we will ask them questions. Closed vs open questions.
  22. 22. Components of good listening Communicating to clarify meaning Closed questions can be answered in a few words or with a yes or no. They are useful for obtaining information and helping to focus the communication. Open questions are those that allow for and encourages others to talk and help them to be more specific or to express their feelings about something.
  23. 23. 2. Communication Skills – Week 7 Client confidentiality and privacy 27/8/2013
  24. 24. Maintaining Confidentiality There are certainly times when staff discussion must take place regarding children/families but it would be on a “need to know” basis. In other words not all staff may need to know what is happening. Can you think of any confidentiality matters where not all staff may need to know?
  25. 25. Maintaining Confidentiality There will also be occasions when ALL STAFF are required to know about certain matters. Can you think of some examples? Perhaps all staff may only need to know part of a confidential matter. Whatever the case, the information that is shared with you must remain confidential.
  26. 26. Maintaining Confidentiality You may not always be told certain information is deemed confidential You must assume that ALL information is exactly that and not for you to discuss or share with anyone.
  27. 27. Exceptions to the rule of confidentiality 1) Making records available to the police if they have a warrant to inspect documents 2) Making information available in the case of suspected or confirmed physical or sexual abuse 3) Responding to a summons or subpoena 4) Responding to a request under the freedom of information legislation
  28. 28. 2. Communication Skills – Week 8 3/9/2013 RESPECTING DIVERSITY AVOIDING DISCRIMMINATION IN COMMUNICATION
  29. 29. Respecting diversity PEOPLE ARE ALL DIFFERENT! In the workplace you will come across people who are very different from you.
  30. 30. Respecting diversity (cont) Differences are due to: 1) Our own individual preferences; 2) Our family backgrounds; 3) Our own talents, skills and abilities. These factors have an impact on how we differ from others. They are neither right or wrong – they are simply differences.
  31. 31. Respecting diversity (cont) Egocentric and ethnocentric worldviews 1) We see what happens around us from our own point of view about things and, 2) we assume that this is the way things really are.... HOWEVER, ARE THESE ASSUMPTIONS CORRECT?
  32. 32. Respecting diversity (cont) Egocentric and ethnocentric worldviews The reality is that people have many different points of view and their culture and life experiences affect their point of view.
  33. 33. Respecting diversity (cont) HOW MUCH DO YOU FEEL YOUR VIEWS ON DIVERSITY AND, HOW YOU ACCEPT DIFFERENCES IN OTHER PEOPLE CAN AFFECT THE CHILDREN YOU ARE WORKING CLOSELY WITH?
  34. 34. AVOIDING DISCRIMMINATION IN COMMUNICATION
  35. 35. Avoiding discrimination in communication (Being treated unfairly because of who they are) Discrimination happens in different forms – some examples in Australian history are.... Gender – females were not allowed to vote until the early 1900's Sexual orientation – same sex couples are not permitted to marry Racial background – in Australia, government policy until the 1960's (and up until 1973) promoted the White Australia Policy
  36. 36. Avoiding discrimination in communication (cont) Religious belief – no vegetarian alternatives were provided to meet the religious dietary requirements until recently Cultural background – the wearing of head scarves (hajib), was not permitted in some occupations (e.g. female officers within policing) until recently.
  37. 37. Avoiding discrimination in communication (cont) In our day to day communication, we can avoid being discriminatory by paying attention to our words and actions. We need to use communication that puts values into practice e.g. not calling anyone a spastic if they do something silly.... What can we do to be respectful?
  38. 38. 3. Accessing relevant information – Week 9 10/9/2013 GATHERING INFORMATION FROM A SERVICE
  39. 39. GATHERING INFORMATION FROM A SERVICE Pamphlets Information booklets Information videos Websites Policy documents
  40. 40. 3. Accessing relevant information – Week 10 17/9/2013 Providing appropriate referrals Pp 31 – 35 CHCCCOM201C Learner Guide Version 1 RESPONDING TO MESSAGES APPROPRIATELY
  41. 41. Responding to messages appropriately  Types of messages  Written messages  Verbal messages  Messages reaching the desired person Providing appropriate referrals
  42. 42. Responding to messages appropriately  Types of messages A variety of methods of transferring and receiving messages exist. These include verbal, visual and written forms.
  43. 43. Element 2 – Present a positive image of the service to the public
  44. 44. COMMUNICATING WITH THE PUBLIC When working in a community service agency we become representatives of that agency. 
  45. 45. COMMUNICATING WITH THE PUBLIC When answering the phone in a work setting, it is important to give a caller the following information  A greeting;  The service name;  Your name.
  46. 46. COMMUNICATING WITH THE PUBLIC Using names  When speaking to clients – especially during the first contact, it is important to address the client by name and to be more formal when you first meet people. When first speaking to them – use their full name or the name they have asked to be addressed by. 
  47. 47. COMMUNICATING WITH THE PUBLIC Explaining processes  When working with clients it is also important to give them details about how long it will take to assist them – this is particularly important if you are working in an agency situation. Giving indications about time and explaining what you are doing in simple language with the client will help them to feel valued and respected. 
  48. 48. COMMUNICATING WITH THE PUBLIC Being courteous even when the client isn't  This is quite a common occurrence when working in the community services industry. As mentioned in earlier topics, there will be times when you will need to deal with clients who are angry and upset or who are blaming you for things that may be beyond your control. 
  49. 49. COMMUNICATING WITH THE PUBLIC Personal presentation  Each service will have a code of dress. This can often be listed within the code of conduct or professional listing of expectations.  This means that there is acceptable and unacceptable clothing and footwear. 

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