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Aaa 115 lesson 5 6
Aaa 115 lesson 5 6
Aaa 115 lesson 5 6
Aaa 115 lesson 5 6
Aaa 115 lesson 5 6
Aaa 115 lesson 5 6
Aaa 115 lesson 5 6
Aaa 115 lesson 5 6
Aaa 115 lesson 5 6
Aaa 115 lesson 5 6
Aaa 115 lesson 5 6
Aaa 115 lesson 5 6
Aaa 115 lesson 5 6
Aaa 115 lesson 5 6
Aaa 115 lesson 5 6
Aaa 115 lesson 5 6
Aaa 115 lesson 5 6
Aaa 115 lesson 5 6
Aaa 115 lesson 5 6
Aaa 115 lesson 5 6
Aaa 115 lesson 5 6
Aaa 115 lesson 5 6
Aaa 115 lesson 5 6
Aaa 115 lesson 5 6
Aaa 115 lesson 5 6
Aaa 115 lesson 5 6
Aaa 115 lesson 5 6
Aaa 115 lesson 5 6
Aaa 115 lesson 5 6
Aaa 115 lesson 5 6
Aaa 115 lesson 5 6
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Aaa 115 lesson 5 6

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  • 1.
  • 2.
  • 3. WHAT DO YOU VALUE
  • 4. MY VALUES
    The fit between your values and the rewards in the job affects how happy you are in your job. Also how well you perform on the job is affected by how happy you are with the job. So, when exploring careers, it is useful to look at your values because using your values in your work will satisfy you and perhaps enhance your job performance.
  • 5. VALUES CONCEPTS
    Making use of my abilities
    Treated fairly by the business
    Busy all the time
    Opportunity for advancement
    Give directions and instructions to others
    Provide feeling of accomplishment
    Pay compares well with co-workers
    Co-workers easy to get along with
    Try out my own ideas
    Work alone
    Never be pressured to do things against my beliefs
    Recognition for the work I do
    Make my own decisions
    Steady employment
    Do things for others
    Supervisors back me up to management
    Supervisors who train workers well
    Do something different every day
    Good working conditions
    Plan my own work; little supervision
  • 6. Bobilator decision sheet
    What about an occupation is important to you? Is it important because you are familiar with its name? Because you know someone who works in the occupation? Because you can make lots of money?
    Step 1:
    aLook at the occupations listed in the first column.
    aThink about what workers in these occupations might do.
    aWith only the name of the occupation provided, rate your interest in them from 1 to 10. 1 is the least interesting and 10 is the most interesting.
    aPut your ratings in the column labeled Step 1.
  • 7. Step 2:
    aStudy the information provided for each occupation.
    aRank them from 1 to 10 based on your interest in the occupation.
    aPut your rankings in the column labeled Step 2.
    1. Bobilator…………….……... Human services
    2. Gastronomist……………... Hospitality and tourism
    3. Extricator………………….. Health science
    4. Arbologist…………............ Agriculture, food, and natural resources
    5. Husher……………………… Education and training
    6. Wrencher…………………... Architecture and construction
    7. Knowleologist…………….. Education and training
    8. Encodologist……………… Information technology
    9. Imagizer…………….……… Arts, Audio/Visual technology, and
    Communication
    10. Haulassister………............ Transportation, distribution, and logistics
  • 8. Step 3: How important is money to you?
    aCheck the salary ranges for the occupations.
    aRank your occupations again from 1 to 10.
    aPut your rankings in the column labeled Step 3.
    1. Bobilator…………………… $14,220-$37,300/annual
    2. Gastronomist……………... $22,870-$51,620/annual
    3. Extricator…......…………… $60,930-$145,000/annual
    4. Arbologist…………………. $29,600-$82,120/annual
    5. Husher.…………………….. $12,070-$26,680/annual
    6. Wrencher…………..………. $24,400-$63,150/annual
    7. Knowleologist…………….. $29,240-$56,580/annual
    8. Encodologist……..……….. $33,310-$90,020/annual
    9. Imagizer…………..………... $31,190-$95,170/annual
    10. Haulassister………………. $15,210-$43,620/annual
  • 9. Step 4: How easy will it be to find a job?
    aReview the number of job openings there will be each year.
    aThink about all the information that has been provided.
    aRank your occupations again from 1 to 10.
    aPut your rankings in the column labeled Step 4.
    1.Bobilator 109 job openings each year
    2.Gastronomist 76 job openings each year
    3.Extricator 17 job openings each year
    4.Arbologist 2 job openings each year
    5.Husher 30 job openings each year
    6.Wrencher 87 job openings each year
    7.Knowleologist 706 job openings each year
    8.Encodologist 78 job openings each year
    9.Imagizer 1 job openings each year
    10. Haulassister 432 job openings each year
  • 10. Step 5: How many months or years of training are you willing to complete to get the job you want? Training could be provided after you get the job or it could mean attending college.
    aStudy the length of training for each occupation.
    aThink about all the information that has been shared with you.
    aRank your occupations again from 1 to 10.
    • Put your rankings in the column labeled Step 5.
    1. Bobilator……………........... About 16 months
    2. Gastronomist……………… Up to 3 years
    3. Extricator………………….. 6 to 8 years
    4. Arbologist…………………. 4 to 6 years
    5. Husher……………………... about a month
    6. Wrencher………………….. 3 to 4 years
    7. Knowleologist…………….. 4 to 5 years
    8. Encodologist……………… 2 to 5 years
    9. Imagizer……………………. 4 to 5 Weeks
    10. Haulassister……………..... Less than 1 year
  • 11. Step 6: Do you want to work indoors or outdoors? Are you willing to work at night and on weekends? These are working conditions.
    aRead about the working conditions for each occupation.
    aThink about all the information that has been shared with you.
    aRank your occupations again from 1 to 10.
    aPut your rankings in the column labeled Step 6.
    • Bobilator: Indoors; standing; work nights and weekends
    • 12. Gastronomist: Indoors; standing; heat; work nights and weekends
    • 13. Extricator: Indoors; close people contact; may work nights and weekends
    • 14. Arbologist: Indoors and outdoors; standing and sitting; may travel
    • 15. Husher: Indoors; standing and sitting; lifting; may work nights and weekends
    • 16. Wrencher: Outdoors or indoors; physical work; may work nights and weekends
    • 17. Knowleologist: Indoors; 10 months a year; work nights and weekends
    • 18. Encodologist: Indoors; sitting; may work alone
    • 19. Imagizer: Indoors; work alone; meet deadlines
    • 20. Haulassister: Outdoors and indoors; may work nights and weekends; sitting and lifting
  • Step 7: What are the real names for the occupations?
    ayour ideas in the last column.
    Bobilator decision sheet 2
    Which step's information is most important to you? Step #
    Why?
    Which step's information is least important to you? Step #
    Why?
    Which occupation would you rank #1?
    Why?
  • 21. Bobilator occupations
    1. Bobilator Hairstylist
    2. Gastronomist Chef or Cook
    3. Extricator Dentist
    4. Arbologist Forester
    5. Husher Library Assistant
    6. Wrencher Plumber or Pipefitter
    7. Knowleologist Teacher
    8. Encodologist Computer programmer
    9. Imagizer Film or Video editor
    10. Haulassister Light truck driver
  • 22. AZ CIS
    www.azcis.intocareers.org
    username: glendalecc
    password: 4azcis02
  • 23. VIDEOS
    http://www.azcis.intocareers.org/materials/tutorials/user/SKILLS_demo.htm
    http://www.azcis.intocareers.org/materials/tutorials/user/occsort_demo.htm
  • 24. P333 OF TEXT
  • 25. Program and course requirements
    (Print out for your major)
    http://www.gc.maricopa.edu/catalog/programs/index.htm
  • 26.
  • 27. P 319
  • 28.
  • 29.
  • 30.
  • 31. HOLLAND'S PERSONALITY "TYPES"
  • 32. R - Realistic Personality
    Realistic individuals are capable and confident when using their bodies to relate to the physical world. They focus on
    things, learn through their hands, and have little need for conversation. They prefer working with objects, tools,
    machines or animals, often in an outdoor setting. The realistic person usually has mechanical or athletic abilities and
    values concrete things or tangible personal characteristics like money, power, status, etc. Realistic people sometimes get
    so absorbed in putting things right that they can forget about everything else.
  • 33. I. - Investigative Personality
    The investigative type deals with the "real world" of things, but at a distance. These individuals prefer observing,
    learning, investigating, analyzing and evaluating data instead of getting their hands on things. They seek to understand
    and control physical, biological or cultural phenomena. When involved with people, they tend to focus on ideas. They
    often have scientific and mathematical abilities and value intellectual pursuits. Wherever they are, they collect
    information and analyze the situation before making a decision. Their curiosity sometimes leads them to explore their
    ideas to the exclusion of all else.
  • 34. A. - Artistic Personality
    The artistic type is creative, but not necessarily with paint and canvas. These individuals express creativity not only with
    material objects but with language, form, data or other systems as well. Creative people see possibilities beyond the
    usual. They would rather create ideas than study them. They like variety and are not afraid to experiment, often
    disregarding rules. The artistic type usually has artistic, innovative or intuitional abilities. They enjoy language, art, or
    music, and value aesthetic qualities. Their ideas don't always please others, but opposition doesn't discourage them for
    long.
  • 35. S. - Social Personality
    The social personality prefers working with people to inform, train, develop, cure or enlighten them. Sensitive to
    people's moods and feelings, these individuals enjoy company and make friends easily. Their level of caring may range
    from one person to the entire human race. Their relationships with people depend on their ability to communicate both
    verbally and nonverbally, listening as well as speaking. Their empathy and ability to intuit emotional cues help them to
    solve problems sometimes even before others are aware of them. They can pull people together and generate positive
    energy for a good cause. They have abilities in the areas of interpersonal relations and teaching. Their main values
    focus on social and ethical concerns. The social personality types sometimes focus on people concerns to the exclusion
    of all else. They sometimes appear "impractical," especially to the realistic types.
  • 36. E. - Enterprising Personality
    The enterprising person enjoys working with people to attain organizational goals or economic gain. This person is a
    leader who initiates projects but often gets others to carry them out. They have strong interpersonal and persuasive
    abilities and value political and economic achievement. Instead of doing research, these people rely on intuition about
    what will work. They may strike an observer as restless and irresponsible since they often drop these projects after the
    job is underway. But many activities would never get off the ground without their energizing influence. They need to
    be a part of the "in crowd," but since their relationships center around tasks, they may focus so dynamically on the
    project that the personal concerns of others (and even their own) go unnoticed.
  • 37. C. - Conventional Personality
    The conventional person also is task oriented but prefers to carry out tasks initiated by others. They enjoy working with
    data in an ordered, explicit, systematic way. Since they are careful of detail, these individuals keep the world's records
    and transmit its messages. They obey rules and they value order in the world of data. They often have clerical,
    computational and business system abilities and value business and economic achievement. Their sense of responsibility
    keeps the world going as they focus on the tasks at hand to the exclusion of all else.

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