Infant Attachment Styles In Relation To Adult Romantic

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  • I wanted to research the relationship between infant attachment styles and adult romantic attachment styles because attachment in infancy is our first experience of closeness. I was curious to see how the two attachment styles relate to each other and how much of infant attachment continues into adulthood.
  • This study was conducted using 304 adult participants, which is a good sample size to represent the adult population. Each age group was studied in the areas of self-confidence, psychological well-being, and social functioning in relation to insecure and secure attachment. The study found that adult attachment styles are affected by infant attachment styles, and therefore supports my hypothesis.
  • This article discusses the significance of infant-caregiver relationships in a variety of species. The authors studied the evolution of adult attachment, and found that species exhibiting adult attachment characterized with developmental immaturity, paternal care, small social groups, and small body size. This article is only useful in supporting my hypothesis with the information obtained from human attachment styles.
  • This article discusses the individual differences between secure and insecure attachment styles, and explains how these affect adult romantic attachment. The author describes caregiver bonds in relation to attachment systems. This article supports my hypothesis that adult attachment styles are continuations of infant parental attachment because it examines the way adults relate to each other in romantic relationships based on their individual attachment styles.
  • This study was conducted using 78 participants who were studied intensively from infancy to their mid-twenties. The authors studied each participant’s attachment style in infancy, elementary school, and adolescence, and compared it to their current attachment style. After observing their emotional behavior, the authors found that participants who were securely attached at 12 months were more socially capable in elementary school. They also found that securely attached 16 year olds were more likely to have more positive daily emotional experiences in their romantic relationships as adults. This study supports my hypothesis because it shows the development of attachment from infancy to adulthood.
  • The authors of this study examined adolescent relationships between parents and romantic partners. There were 568 participants in this study, all between the ages of 15 and 19. This article supports my hypothesis because it discusses the relationship between childhood attachment styles and emotional disturbance which may affect adult romantic attachment.
  • This study was conducted using a survey of 374 undergraduates. Survey topics included attachment style, attachment history, beliefs about relationships, self-esteem, loving, love addiction, and love styles. Each attachment style showed different attitudes about parental figures, and different needs in relationships. This article supports my hypothesis because it discusses emotional needs in romantic relationships based on attachment styles.
  • This study was conducted using all male participants. It discusses the relationship between attachment styles, the ideal image of one’s mate, and the ideal image of oneself and one’s mother. The study strays away from my question of whether attachment styles affect intimacy in adult romantic relationships, but it presents useful information about the ideal image of a mate in men based on attachment style.
  • This study examines the effect of interparental conflict on adolescent dating relationships. The article does not support my hypothesis because it does not mention attachment styles, but it does discuss parental relationships and their affect on adolescent romantic relationships.
  • This study examined the attachment styles of men and women, and compared their emotional responses in a counseling situation. The authors found that there is not much difference in responses if the attachment style is shared. This article supports my hypothesis because it discusses the affect of attachment style on emotional expression and intent, which would affect romantic relationships.
  • This study examined the attachment styles of 144 dating couples. The attachment styles studied were anxious, avoidant, and secure, which were different from any of the other studies I reviewed. The authors found that each attachment style continues into adulthood, with attitudes about the romantic partner being similar to those of the parental figure. This article supports my hypothesis because it shows that adult romantic attachment is a continuation of childhood attachment style.
  • Infant Attachment Styles In Relation To Adult Romantic

    1. 1. Infant Attachment Styles in Relation to Adult Romantic Attachment A Literature Review by Cassandra Gabler
    2. 2. Adult Attachment Styles: Their Relations to Family Context and Personality <ul><li>Conducted using 304 adult participants </li></ul><ul><li>Each age group studied separately to show differences in attachment styles </li></ul><ul><li>Studied self-confidence, psychological well-being, and social functioning in relation to insecure and secure attachment styles </li></ul><ul><li>Supports my hypotheses in that attachment styles continue into adulthood </li></ul>
    3. 3. The Evolution and Function of Adult Attachment: A Comparative and Phylogenetic Analysis <ul><li>Discusses the significance of infant-caregiver relationships </li></ul><ul><li>Studied the evolution of adult attachment, found that species exhibiting adult attachment were characterized with developmental immaturity, paternal care, small social groups, small body size. </li></ul><ul><li>Focuses on other species than humans, useful only in looking at human relationships </li></ul>
    4. 4. Adult Romantic Attachments: A Developmental Perspective on Individual Differences <ul><li>Discusses the individual differences between secure and insecure attachment styles </li></ul><ul><li>Explains how these affect adult romantic attachment </li></ul><ul><li>Describes caregiver bonds in relation to attachment </li></ul><ul><li>Supports my hypothesis while examining the ways adults relate to each other based on individual attachment styles </li></ul>
    5. 5. Attachment and the Experience and Expression of Emotions in Romantic Relationships: A Developmental Perspective <ul><li>Conducted with 78 participants studied intensively from infancy to their mid-twenties </li></ul><ul><li>Studied each participant’s attachment style in infancy, elementary school, and adolescence, and compared it to their current attachment style </li></ul><ul><li>Found that participants who were securely attached at twelve months were more socially capable during elementary school </li></ul><ul><li>Securely attached at sixteen more likely to have more positive daily emotional experiences </li></ul>
    6. 6. Parental Attachment and Romantic Relationships: Association with Emotional Disturbance during Late Adolescence <ul><li>Observed whether associations between parental attachment and emotional disturbance were less strong for adolescents in romantic relationships </li></ul><ul><li>568 participants between ages of 15-19 </li></ul><ul><li>Supports my hypothesis by reviewing childhood attachment styles and their relationships to emotional disturbance </li></ul>
    7. 7. Attachment Style as a Predictor of Adult Romantic Relationships <ul><li>Conducted using a survey of 374 undergraduates </li></ul><ul><li>Topics included attachment style, attachment history, beliefs about relationships, self-esteem, loving, love addiction, and love styles </li></ul><ul><li>Each attachment style showed different attitudes about parental figures, and different needs in relationships </li></ul>
    8. 8. Attachment Styles and the Ideal Image of a Mate <ul><li>Discusses the relationship between attachment styles, the ideal image of one’s mate, and the ideal image of oneself and one’s mother </li></ul><ul><li>Participants were all male </li></ul><ul><li>Useful information about attachment styles and romantic partners relating to men </li></ul><ul><li>Supports my hypothesis by showing the relationship between male’s attachment styles and their ideal image of a mate in adulthood </li></ul>
    9. 9. Interparental Conflict and Adolescent Dating Relationships: Integrating Cognitive, Emotional, and Peer Influences <ul><li>Examines the effect of interparental conflict on adolescent dating relationships </li></ul><ul><li>Does not support my hypothesis because it does not discuss attachment styles </li></ul><ul><li>Does discuss parental relationships and their affect on adolescent romantic relationships </li></ul>
    10. 10. Affective Dimensions of Attachment Styles <ul><li>Examines the attachment styles of men and women and compares emotional responses in a counseling situation </li></ul><ul><li>Found there is not much difference if attachment style is shared </li></ul><ul><li>Supports my hypothesis by discussing attachment style and the affect it has on emotional expression and intent </li></ul>
    11. 11. Influence of Attachment Styles on Romantic Relationships <ul><li>Examined the attachment styles of 144 dating couples </li></ul><ul><li>Includes anxious, avoidant, and secure attachment styles </li></ul><ul><li>Results show that each attachment style continues into adulthood, with attitudes about the romantic partner being similar to those of the parental figure </li></ul><ul><li>Supports my hypothesis by showing that adult romantic attachment is a continuation of childhood attachment style </li></ul>
    12. 12. <ul><li>References </li></ul><ul><li>Bourbeau, L.S., Diehl, M., Elnick, A.B., & Labouvie-Vief, L. (1998). Adult attachment styles: their relations to family context and personality. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology , 74 (6), Retrieved from http:// ft.csa.com.libproxy.edmc.edu / </li></ul><ul><li>Brumbaugh, C.C., Fraley, R.C., & Marks, M.J. (2005). The evolution and function of adult attachment: a comparative and phylogenetic analysis. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology , 89 (5), Retrieved from http:// ft.csa.com.libproxy.edmc.edu / </li></ul><ul><li>Cassidy, J. (2000). Adult romantic attachments: a developmental perspective on individual differences. Review of General Psychology , 4 (2), Retrieved from http:// ft.csa.com.libproxy.edmc.edu / </li></ul><ul><li>Collins, W.A., Haydon, K.C., Simpson, J.A., & Tran, S. (2007). Attachment and the experience and expression of emotions in romantic relationships: a developmental perspective. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology , 92 (2), Retrieved from http:// ft.csa.com.libproxy.edmc.edu / </li></ul><ul><li>Engels, R.C., Meeus, W., Overbeek, G., & Vollebergh, W. (2003). Parental attachment and romantic relationships: association with emotional disturbance in late adolescence. Journal of Counseling Psychology , 50 (1), Retrieved from http:// ft.csa.com.libproxy.edmc.edu / </li></ul>
    13. 13. <ul><li>Feeney, J.A., & Noller, P. (1990). Attachment style as a predictor of adult romantic relationships. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology , 58 (2), Retrieved from http:// ft.csa.com.libproxy.edmc.edu / </li></ul><ul><li>Goldzweigst, G., Guttman, R., & Tolmacz, R. (2004). Attachment styles and the ideal image of a mate. European Psychologist , 9 (2), Retrieved from http:// ft.csa.com.libproxy.edmc.edu / </li></ul><ul><li>Grych, J.H., & Kinsfogel, K.M. (2004). Interparental conflict and adolescent dating relationships: integrating cognitive, emotional, and peer influences. Journal of Family Psychology , 18 (3), Retrieved from http:// ft.csa.com.libproxy.edmc.edu / </li></ul><ul><li>Meara, N.M., & Searle, B. (1999). Affective dimensions of attachment styles. Journal of Counseling Psychology , 46 (2), Retrieved from http:// ft.csa.com.libproxy.edmc.edu / </li></ul><ul><li>Simpson, J.A. (1990). Influence of attachment styles on romantic relationships. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology , 59 (5), Retrieved from http:// ft.csa.com.libproxy.edmc.edu / </li></ul>

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