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Triadic Game Design by Casper Harteveld
 

Triadic Game Design by Casper Harteveld

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This is my book presentation of "Triadic Game Design: Balancing Reality, Meaning and Play", published by Springer in 2011 (for more information, see http://triadicgamedesign.com). In this presentation ...

This is my book presentation of "Triadic Game Design: Balancing Reality, Meaning and Play", published by Springer in 2011 (for more information, see http://triadicgamedesign.com). In this presentation I describe my journey into the worlds of games and how this led me to write this book. I compare my journey to the one by Charles Darwin (although by far not of the same scientific magnitude of course). Like him, I obsersed what happened and tried to reflect what this meant. A big difference between his and my journey is that my journey took place virtually (represented by the screenshot of Ship Simulator). An important part of the journey was to design a game eventually called Levee Patroller. Levee patrollers are people who inspect levees, barriers that protect the land from flooding, in the Netherlands. During my journey I saw many perspectives in the world of games and while designing I encountered these many perspectives continuously. After reflecting what happened I established a design philosophy called "Triadic Game Design".

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  • In the painting, Brueghel depicts over 200 children engaged in over 80 play activities. Not all of these play activities are games in the strict sense. Of these activities, over 20 children's games are individually illustrated and discussed on this Website. Many of these games are still played today. Brueghel painted these games in 1560.
  • In the painting, Brueghel depicts over 200 children engaged in over 80 play activities. Not all of these play activities are games in the strict sense. Of these activities, over 20 children's games are individually illustrated and discussed on this Website. Many of these games are still played today. Brueghel painted these games in 1560.
  • In the painting, Brueghel depicts over 200 children engaged in over 80 play activities. Not all of these play activities are games in the strict sense. Of these activities, over 20 children's games are individually illustrated and discussed on this Website. Many of these games are still played today. Brueghel painted these games in 1560.
  • C++
  • Al doendekwamik al snel tot het inzichtdatvoor het ontwerpen van eenspeleenbalansgezochtmoetwordentussendrieverschillendewerelden. Ditmaakt het ontwerpen erg lastig.
  • Borroeman rings
  • Al doendekwamik al snel tot het inzichtdatvoor het ontwerpen van eenspeleenbalansgezochtmoetwordentussendrieverschillendewerelden. Ditmaakt het ontwerpen erg lastig.
  • Quake en Counterstrike
  • Al doendekwamik al snel tot het inzichtdatvoor het ontwerpen van eenspeleenbalansgezochtmoetwordentussendrieverschillendewerelden. Ditmaakt het ontwerpen erg lastig.

Triadic Game Design by Casper Harteveld Triadic Game Design by Casper Harteveld Presentation Transcript

  • It takes twoto tango, but it takes threeto design a meaningful game.
    Bookpresentation
    Casper Harteveld
  • Get your stuff!
    And go back in time!
  • August 2005
  • Igor Mayer
    TU Delft
    Jos Maccabiani
    GeoDelft / Deltares
  • Assignment:
    Develop a game to train leveepatrollers
  • Casper about
    8 years old
    Casper (expected) about 35 years old
  • LEVEL 0
    Standing on the shoulders of Giants
    A history pop up screen
  • 1910
    1984
  • Games with a purpose
    Persuasivegames
    Serious games
    Advergames
    Practiceware
    Meaningfulgames
    Epistemicgames
    Sims
    Edutainment
    Edugaming
    Gaming simulations
    Immersivelearning environments
    Simulators
  • System.out.println(“bettergame technology”)
    What is a game?
    Computer scientist
    Philosopher
    And
    more
    Experimenter
    Sociologist
    What do you feel whenplaying?
    What do games meanfor society?
  • LEVEL 1
    Gathering information
    Manyperspectives
  • And
    more
  • And
    more
  • Behaviorism
    Cognitivism
    Constructionism
    Humanism
    Socio-constructivism
    Constructivism
    Socio-culturalism
  • Jean Piaget
    John Dewey
    Ivan Pavlov
    Albert Bandura
    Edward Thorndike
    And
    more
    David Kolb
    B.F. Skinner
    Lev Vygotsky
    NoamChomsky
  • We want a focus on communication!
    Failure X needstobeincluded!
    Client A
    Client C
    Client E
    Rivers, rivers, rivers!!!
    Limited responsibilities
    Client B
    Client D
    We speak of X and Y.
  • Casper, itworkslikethis.
    Casper, itworkslikethis.
    Casper, itworkslikethis.
    Casper, itworkslikethis.
  • It needstobefun, like Super Mario!
    We needsheep!
    Yeahyeahyeah…
    I need a gun no matter what!
    How aboutsomemusic?
    We needthis feature from game X.
  • LEVEL 2
    Creating the game
    Dealingwithdilemmas
  • Usabilitytension
    I am more user friendly.
    Yes, but I am EVERYWHERE.
    Yes yes, but I am EVERYWHERE.
    VS.
    Winner!
    I requireless parallel processing.
    And I amnotsocluttered.
  • Uncertaintytension
    In realityyoualsodon’tknow.
    Hmm, yes, anduncertainycreatesexcitement!
    But you have to have clear goals!
    Winner!
  • Scope tension
    Well…notsureabout transfer.
    Critical!
    Notinteresting!
  • October 2006
    Delft
  • LEVEL 3
    Understanding whathappened – part I
    Three worlds
  • World nr. 1: Reality
  • World nr. 2: Meaning
  • Behaviorism
    Cognitivism
    Constructionism
    Humanism
    Constructivism
    Socio-constructivism
    Socio-culturalism
  • World nr. 3: Play
  • LEVEL 4
    Understanding whathappened – part II
    Balancing
  • Usability
    Uncertainty
    Scope
  • LEVEL 5
    Understanding whathappened – part III
    Concurrent design
  • Complex system
  • Procedural approach
    Duke and*
    Geurts, 2004
  • End level
    It takes twoto tango, but it takes threeto design a meaningful game.
  • 1. Three worlds
    3. Concurrent
    Design
    2. Balancing
  • THANK YOU!
    Rens van den Bergh, Arne Bezuijen, RuiGuimaraes, MichelineHounjet, AlmarJoling, Jos Maccabiani, Raymond van der Meij, Arjan Peters, Monique Sanders, MatthijsSchaap, Sander Smit, Tom Thé, Marco Tolman, Bas Wenneker, Maarten Wesselius, and Maarten van Zomeren.
  • Game Over?!
    http://triadicgamedesign.com