UbD Tools For Effective Unit Design

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Understanding by Design Workshop

Understanding by Design Workshop

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  • 1. UbD as a Tool for Effective Unit Design Presented by Connie Petner, Libby Skinner, Gina Venezia, Bob Cashill, Tom White, Glenn Cesa, Anthony Lanzo, Rich Rampolla
  • 2. Something to Think About
  • 3. What’s the BIG Picture?
    • Using the UbD Framework, develop a unit for October 10th follow-up professional day
    • Receive related training in Curriculum Mapping from Rubicon Atlas
    • Participate in follow-up professional development meetings with other staff & today’s trainers
    • Utilize the UbD wiki http://www.veronaubd.wetpaint.com
    • You can do it – We can help!
  • 4. Rank the following in order of importance in developing your lessons:
    • New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards
    • Teacher Editions
    • Assessments
    • District Curriculum
    • Taught Curriculum
  • 5. UbD…huh???
    • UbD stands for U nderstanding b y D esign.
    • It is a recommendation for effective unit design in education.
    • It was developed by Grant Wiggins and Jay McTighe.
  • 6. By design , UbD addresses these key areas
    • Teachers who teach the textbook
    • Courses with no transparent priorities or goals
    • Courses that have no clear relation to state standards, program goals, and/or school mission
  • 7. The BIG ideas of UbD
    • UbD Big Idea Why important? If not…
    • Backward Plans need to be Aimless activity or
    • `Design well aligned to be coverage
    • effective
    • Understanding The essence of Students fail to
    • Transfer understanding & the apply
    • point of schooling Poor test results
    • Understanding How transfer happens Learning is more
    • via Big Ideas Makes learning more difficult, less
    • connected engaging, and
    • fragmented
  • 8. Two Key Understandings
    • You must design “backward” from understanding if you want to achieve understanding “by design”
    • Without transparent and important priorities - stated as performance, not content - neither teacher nor student can be effective; nor can they make wise decisions when inevitable adjustments have to be made
  • 9. Example: Teacher 1
    • In late April, a history teacher begins to panic
    • because he cannot finish the textbook unless he
    • averages 40 pages per day. He decides to eliminate
    • a unit on Latin America and a few time-consuming
    • activities such as a mock UN debate and discussions
    • of how current international events impact the
    • world history topics they have been studying. His
    • priority becomes moving to a fast-forward lecture
    • mode to be sure his students are prepared for the
    • departmental final exam.
    • Comment?
  • 10. Example: Teacher 2
    • A third grade unit on apples features a reading
    • about Johnny Appleseed, the writing of a creative
    • story about an apple and the illustration of an apple
    • using tempura paints. Students collect leaves from
    • apple trees and make an apple leaf collage. The
    • music teacher teaches songs about apples. In math,
    • the teacher shows students how to scale up an
    • applesauce recipe to make enough for the entire
    • third grade. The students take a trip to an apple
    • orchard where they go on a hayride and watch cider
    • being made. During the culminating “Apple Fest”
    • students do a number of activities including bob for
    • apples, make applesauce, do apple word searches and read their apple stories to the whole group.
    • Comment?
  • 11. Twin Sins of Unit Design: “Coverage-focused” teaching “Activity-focused” teaching
    • Teacher 1 is focused on “getting through” the
    • material; Teacher 2 is focused on keeping
    • students active and engaged.
    • Neither method reveals any clear intellectual
    • goals. Any understanding that happens is
    • essentially a piece of good luck.
    • Understanding is not a part of the design.
  • 12. Exercise #1: What is Understanding?
    • Please refer to the sheet
    • for Exercise #1 in your binder.
  • 13. The BIG ideas of UbD
    • UbD Big Idea Why important? If not…
    • `Backward Plans need to be Aimless activity or
    • `Design well aligned to be coverage
    • effective
    • Understanding The essence of Students fail to
    • Transfer understanding & the apply
    • point of schooling Poor test results
    • Understanding How transfer happens Learning is more
    • via Big Ideas Makes learning more difficult, less
    • connected engaging, and
    • fragmented
  • 14. The course is not the content
    • Don’t confuse inputs with outputs :
    • Thousands of car parts with the ability to drive
    • Drills & skills with playing the game well
    • List of ingredients and kitchen skills with the ability to prepare and cook meals
    • The 700 page computer book with the ability to use the software to write letters and reports
  • 15. Are you confusing …
    • “the textbook” with “the course designed to cause a few results”?
    • “teaching” with “having learned”?
  • 16. Teaching vs. Learning
    • Teaching does not cause learning.
    • Successful attempts by the learner to
    • learn and use what they have learned
    • to achieve causes learning
  • 17. I taught spot to whistle. I can’t hear him whistling. I said I taught him. I didn’t say he learned it!
  • 18. Backward Design from “Content Coverage”
    • I want students to understand -
    • The Constitution
    • The three branches of government
    • This is not a learning goal - this just
    • states what the content is.
  • 19. Backward Design from the Understanding Sought
    • I want students to leave my course having
    • understood that:
    • the Constitution was a solution based on compromise to real and pressing problems and disagreements in governance; not an idea out of thin air
    • the Constitution was a brilliant balance and limit of powers but was grounded in a long and sometimes bitter history, with many fights that are and always will be with us
  • 20. Backward Design from the Understanding Sought (continued)
    • I then want students to transfer that
    • understanding to a modern relevant
    • situation:
    • The problem of designing a government for Iraq
    • A system of governance for our school
  • 21. Backward Design from Understanding
    • Content mastery is the means, and thus, a short term goal of instruction.
    • Ask yourself: If content mastery is the means, what is the desired end? In other words, WHY do we teach this?
    • Teacher to class:
    • “ I want you to learn a,b,c, so that, in the long run , you will be able to do x,y,z, , on your own .”
  • 22. Backward Design from Understanding
    • Implications to the teacher:
    • You have to design your courses backward from the kinds of problems, tasks, situations, and conditions you want students to be able to eventually handle on their own (student autonomy).
  • 23. Content mastery = the means Physical Education Example
    • If content mastery is the means, what is the end?
    • I want you to learn the game of basketball so that, in the long run, you are able, on your own, to understand that implementing an effective offense, defense and cooperative strategies is important for success in all game situations.
    • SO
    • You (teacher) have to design your course BACKWARD from the kinds of cooperative strategies and offense/defense strategies that are necessary for success in this and other activities.
    • This is only one transfer example in
    • a basketball unit. Other examples?
  • 24. Content mastery = the means World Language Example
    • If content mastery is the means, what is the end?
    • I want you to learn the culture of the Spanish people so that, in the long run, you are able, on your own, to gain a cultural perspective of the Spanish people by experiencing their products and practices.
    • SO
    • You (teacher) have to design your course BACKWARD from the products and practices of the Spanish culture that will elicit an understanding of the culture.
    • This is only one transfer example in
    • a World Language unit. Other examples?
  • 25. Content mastery = the means English Example
    • If content mastery is the means, what is the end?
    • I want you to learn grammar so that, in the long run, you are able, on your own, to speak and write in any situation with precision, clarity, and maximum impact.
    • SO
    • You (teacher) have to design your course BACKWARD from the kinds of communication challenges that depend upon precise grammar.
    • This is only one transfer example in
    • an English unit. Other examples?
  • 26. What are the implications for teachers?
    • Usually, teachers lose sight of long term goals for understanding as they focus on short term planning, teaching, and assessing.
    • We say we value critical thinking and genuine problem solving but focus almost exclusively on short term content mastery that runs counter to this belief.
  • 27. Exercise #2: Content
    • Please refer to the sheet
    • for Exercise #2 in your binder.
  • 28. Research on Curriculum
    • A guaranteed and viable curriculum
    • is the #1 school-level factor
    • impacting student achievement.
    • (Marzano, What Works in Schools )
  • 29. Key Understanding
    • Verona currently does not have a curriculum that meets the criteria for understanding. UbD is the solution to this unseen and misunderstood problem.
  • 30. “Brutal” Facts about Curriculum (Wiggins Conference, Summer 2008)
    • * Many teachers have no explicit course goals/priorities.
    • * Teachers mistakenly treat the textbook as the syllabus
    • * In almost no school is anyone required to publish a
    • defendable course syllabus in which they show how
    • Mission and program goals will be achieved.
    • * There is little or no collaboration when writing
    • curriculum.
    • * When we “write” curriculum, we mistakenly write it
    • as content & activities instead of backward from desired
    • accomplishments.
  • 31. Exercise #3: Prairie Day Activity
    • Please read the pages on the Westward Movement (Prairie Day) unit and
    • refer to the sheet for Exercise #3,
    • UbD vs. Typical Unit, in your binder.
  • 32. Sample Student Responses to Prairie Day
    • I liked the punching because you could make your own design or follow other designs. You can see the sunlight through the holes.
    • I liked the station where you wrote a letter. I liked it because you put wax to seal it.
    • It was fun to design an outfit for myself on the computer.
    • I liked the prairie games. My favorite was the sack race because I like jumping.
    • Only 2 out of 78 students
    • responded to the “I learned …” prompt
  • 33. Exercise #3: Verona Chemistry Activity
    • Please refer to the Verona Chemistry unit in your binder.
  • 34. The BIG ideas of UbD
    • UbD big idea Why important? If not…
    • Backward Plans need to be Aimless activity or
    • Design well aligned to be coverage
    • effective
    • Understanding The essence of Students fail to
    • Transfer understanding & the apply
    • point of schooling Poor test results
    • Understanding How transfer happens Learning is more
    • via Big Ideas Makes learning more difficult, less
    • connected engaging, and
    • fragmented
  • 35. Transfer: Defined & Justified
    • What is transfer of learning?
    • Transfer of learning is the use of knowledge
    • and skills, acquired in an earlier context, in a
    • new context . It occurs when a person’s
    • learning in one situation influences that
    • person’s learning and performance in other
    • situations.
  • 36. The Transfer Question
    • What should the student be able to do effectively with a repertoire of knowledge and skills, increasingly on their own, in future tasks?
    • How will transfer ability be developed over the course of the course?
  • 37. The Transfer Question Example
    • Coaching
    • Design the transfer goal backward from
    • playing the game.
    • Desired Results:
    • You are now able to attack any situation
    • presented to you during the game.
  • 38. Transfer - the real “game” of using content on your own
    • Applying prior learning to
    • * a novel and increasingly new and unfamiliar looking task
    • * an increasingly challenging context
    • and situation in terms of purpose,
    • audience, dilemmas, etc.
  • 39. Student autonomy as a gradual release of responsibility:
    • I do, you watch.
    • I do, you help.
    • You do, I help.
    • You do, I watch. (Teacher as facilitator)
  • 40. Textbooks & Transfer
    • The textbook almost never focuses on transfer; rather it provides mostly logically organized content and drills only.
  • 41. Exercise #4: Transfer Draft Template
    • Please refer to the sheet
    • for Exercise #4 in your binder.
    • You will also need your topic unit
    • from Exercise #2.
  • 42. LUNCH TIME!!!!
    • Complete an EXIT card
    • &
    • Enjoy Lunch on your own
    • Be back and ready to start one hour from now!
  • 43. Post Lunch Q & A
    • Are there any burning questions?
    • Answers to exit cards.
  • 44. Teachers, do you get frustrated by students who:
    • fail to recall last week’s or even yesterday’s lessons?
    • cannot transfer their learning?
    • don’t have any idea what they are to do?
    • don’t “get it” and ask “dumb questions’?
    • are bored yet otherwise seem bright?
    • Then UbD may be able to help you!
  • 45. Irony: The most difficult problems on State and AP exams are TRANSFER problems.
    • Unfamiliar reading passages and writing prompts
    • Unfamiliar-looking versions of math and science problems
    • No obvious prompts or clues as to which content applies (since there is no teacher or textbook available to refer to).
  • 46. The items most wrong require transfer and meaning making
    • The following examples are from:
    • Released MCAS tests (Massachusetts)
    • New York Regents exams
    • The National Assessment of Educational
    • Progress (NAEP) from “The Nation’s Report
    • Card”
  • 47.
    • I have a Gumble Cat in mind, her name is Jennyanydots;
    • Her coat is of the tabby kind, with tiger stripes and leopard spots.
    • All day she sits upon the stair or on the steps or on the mat;
    • She sits and sits and sits and sits – and that’s what makes a Gumble Cat.
    • But when the day’s hustle and bustle is done,
    • Then the Gumble Cat’s work is but hardly begun…
    • She thinks that the mice just need employment
    • To prevent them from idle and wonton destroyment.
    • So she’s formed, from that lot of disorderly louts,
    • A troop of well-disciplined helpful boy-scouts,
    • With a purpose in life and a good deed to do
    • And she’s even created a Beetles’ Tatoo.
    • So for Old Gumble Cat let us now give three cheers
    • On whom well-ordered households depend, it appears.
  • 48. 6th Grade English/Language Arts
    • I have a Gumble Cat in mind, her name is Jennyanydots;
    • Her coat is of the tabby kind, with tiger stripes and leopard spots.
    • All day she sits upon the stair or on the steps or on the mat;
    • She sits and sits and sits and sits – and that’s what makes a Gumble Cat.
    • But when the day’s hustle and bustle is done,
    • Then the Gumble Cat’s work is but hardly begun…
    • What do lines 1-6 suggest about the cat during the day?
    • A. She is lazy. C. She is lonely.
    • B. She is angry. D. She is annoyed.
    • Correct Answer: A
    • State Average Correct: 94%
  • 49. 6th Grade English/Language Arts
    • She thinks that the mice just need employment
    • To prevent them from idle and wonton destroyment.
    • So she’s formed, from that lot of disorderly louts,
    • A troop of well-disciplined helpful boy-scouts,
    • With a purpose in life and a good deed to do
    • And she’s even created a Beetles’ Tatoo.
    • So for Old Gumble Cat let us now give three cheers
    • On whom well-ordered households depend, it appears.
    • In lines 7-14, how does the cat attempt to improve the manners of the
    • mice?
    • A. By keeping them busy C. by giving them a lecture
    • B. By chasing them around D. by teaching them to cook
    • Correct Answer: A
    • State Average Correct: 75%
  • 50. 6th Grade English/Language Arts
    • Summary “what’s the point” question?
    • Based on the poem, what’s the cat’s work?
    • A. To sleep away hours in the sun
    • B. To create an organized household
    • C. To surprise the humans in the house
    • D. To make friends with other creatures
    • Correct Answer: B
    • State Average Correct: 59%
  • 51. 10 th Grade MCAS (Massachusetts Example)
    • Of the people in attendance at a recent baseball
    • game, one third had grandstand tickets, one fourth
    • had bleacher seats, and the remaining 11,250 people
    • in attendance had other tickets. What was the total
    • attendance at this game?
    • A. 16,000 C. 20,000
    • B. 18,000 D. 27,000
    • Correct Answer: D
    • Half of the nearly 72,000 test takers got this
    • question wrong, making it the toughest on the exam.
  • 52. NAEP Grade 4 Math Multi-step problem (Calculator available)
    • There will be 58 people at breakfast
    • and each person will eat 2 eggs. There
    • are 12 eggs in each carton. How many
    • cartons will be needed for the breakfast?
    • 9 B. 10 C. 72 D. 116
            • Correct Answer: B
            • Only 21% answered correctly.
  • 53. The Transfer Question
    • What should the students be able to do, on their own, effectively with a repertoire of knowledge, skill, and expertise on future tasks?
  • 54. The BIG ideas of UbD
    • UbD big idea Why important? If not…
    • Backward Plans need to be Aimless activity or
    • Design well aligned to be coverage
    • effective
    • Understanding The essence of Students fail to
    • Transfer understanding & the apply
    • point of schooling Poor test results
    • Understanding How transfer happens Learning is more
    • via Big Ideas Makes learning more difficult, less
    • connected engaging, and
    • fragmented
  • 55. Transfer based on BIG Ideas permits future learning
  • 56. Big Ideas are Linchpins
    • Hold together related concepts
    • Help facts and skills stick together and stick in our minds
    • At the heart of expert understanding of the subject
          • Example: Effective writers hook and hold their readers.
  • 57. Understanding – Anyone? Anyone?
  • 58. Connections Are Key The Dingley Tariff The Hawley-Smoot Tariff How do you balance the goal of free trade with protection of US industries and workers? WTO & NAFTA
  • 59. Big Ideas have to be Uncovered * Not obvious and often counterintuitive. * Like “guiding conjectures” – subject to refinement and adjustment as learning goes on. * Require consideration and reconsideration - Inquiry. * Have great transfer value.
  • 60. You’ve got to go below the surface...
  • 61. to uncover the really ‘big ideas.’
  • 62. Transfer is Vital In each subject field there are some basic ideas which summarize much of what scholars have learned…These ideas give meaning to much that has been learned, and they provide the basic ideas for dealing with many new problems… We believe that this is a primary obligation of the scholars (and) teachers to search constantly for these abstractions, to find ways of helping students learn them, and especially to help students learn how to use them in a great variety of problem situations… Bloom, 1981, p.235
  • 63. A BIG Idea is a working theory, schema, or theme
    • Think of:
    • * a detective sifting through clues to
    • find the best fit, or story, of the facts.
    • * the BIG idea presented by “Deep Throat”
    • in the movie All the President’s Men based
    • on the Watergate scandal: “Follow the money!”
  • 64. Big Ideas – 3 Examples
    • You need to “converse with” and “question” the text and its author –to understand.
    • Success in ball games depends upon making unpredictable and confusing moves.
    • Language and culture are mutually dependent
  • 65. Consider: Which are the Big Ideas?
    • Offense and Defense in
    • Sports
    • 2. Good Triumphs over Evil
    • 3. Natural Selection
    • 4. Four Basic Operations
    5. Fact vs. Opinion 6. Ecosystem 7. “Read Between the Lines” 8. Is that fair?
  • 66. Tips to Find Big Ideas Revealed Through…
    • Concepts – pioneer, migration, adaptation
    • Themes– the pioneer spirit, hardships forged a nation
    • Issues and Debates – progress? –settling the land vs. unsettling the Native Americans
    • Theories – Native Americans as “noble savages”
  • 67. Tips to Find Big Ideas
    • Assumptions – the West as a land of opportunity
    • Paradoxes – pioneer illusion of freedom and prosperity , indentured servants in the land of the free
    • Processes – historical inquiry ( how do we find out what pioneer life was really like?
    • Challenges – surviving the harsh frontier, culture clash
  • 68. BIG ideas in skills areas
    • * Does this piece of writing work for this
    • audience and purpose? (Language Arts)
    • * Create space and uncertainty in your
    • opponent in sports. (Phys Ed)
    • * Communication is the ability to understand
    • and be understood in real world contexts.
    • (Foreign Language)
  • 69. Geography Unit Example - Why there? (1)
    • Give each student a large topographical
    • map of the U.S., your state, or an ancient
    • region. Ask students to identify where big
    • cities are most and least likely to be and
    • explain why.
    • Now give students a road map and ask, “Why
    • there? What’s your theory about settlement
    • and geography?”
  • 70. Geography Unit Example - Why there? (2)
    • Acquire knowledge: have students read
    • the relevant textbook sections on the
    • relation between geography and
    • population settlement.
    • Quiz: regions, settlement, geography
  • 71. Tools for Uncovering BIG Ideas
    • Please refer to the sheets
    • in your binder.
  • 72. Big Ideas are at our fingertips…
    • UbD
    • As related to
    • NJCCCS
    • http:// www.nj.gov/education/aps/njscp /
  • 73. New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards
    • What do you know?
    • Time for a short pre-assessment quiz…
    • (in your binder)
  • 74. New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards (NJCCCS)
    • http://www.nj.gov/education/cccs/
    • Key Terms: Standards, Strands, and Cumulative Progress Indicators (CPI)
    • NJCCCS Activity
    • (please refer to Language Arts Literacy
    • Standards in your binder)
    • NJCCCS Framework Activities for LA, PE, and World Language
    • (also in your binder)
  • 75. Try Unpacking for Big Ideas
    • As you review Standards:
    • Circle key nouns to highlight Big Ideas.
    • Underline key verbs to identify core transfer
    • tasks.
    • All students will speak in clear, concise,
    • organized language that varies in content
    • and form for different audiences and
    • purposes.
    • NJCCCS 3.3
  • 76. Consider: Westward Movement and Pioneer Life Unit Established Goals: National Standards for United States History 2D- Explain the lure of the West while comparing the illusions of migrants with the reality of the frontier. 5A- Demonstrate understanding of the movements of large groups of people in the US now and long ago. 2D- Analyze cultural interactions among diverse groups and consider multiple perspectives.
  • 77. Quote of the day…
    • “ Rarely is the question
    • asked, Is our children
    • learning?” George Bush
  • 78. What is your comfort level after Day 1?
    • Enter 1 = Got it .
    • Enter 2 = Sort of.
    • Enter 3 = WTF?
    • What’s this foolishness?
  • 79.
    • Questions?
    • Anyone?
    • Anyone?
  • 80. WELCOME BACK DAY 2
    • Are there any burning questions or comments from Day 1?
    • Answers to the exit cards…
  • 81. Misunderstanding by Design
  • 82. What is UbD? & Who is it for?
    • What - It is a model for unit design that begins with
    • figuring out the end result first. Basically, it is
    • “ backward design”.
    • Who - “…educators, new or veteran, interested in
    • enhancing student understanding and in designing
    • more effective curricula and assessments to
    • achieve that end.”
    • (Wiggins & McTighe, 2005)
  • 83. 3 Stages of Backward Design 1. Identify desired accomplishments 2. Determine acceptable evidence 3. Plan learning experiences & instruction Then and only then
  • 84. What we typically (incorrectly) do Identify content Brainstorm activities & methods Come up with an assessment Without Checking for Alignment Without Checking for Alignment
  • 85. Refer to Template Sheets in your binder
  • 86. Stage 1 Design Questions
    • What are the Long Term transfer Goals? G
    • In the end, students should be able, on their own, to …
    • What are the desired Understandings? U
    • Students will understand that…
    • What are the essential Questions to be
    • continually explored? Q
    • What Knowledge & Skills should students
    • Leave with? K S
  • 87. What we are hoping you can achieve?
    • At the VERY least we hope you can walk away with 3 pieces of the unit design completed!
    • See examples…
  • 88. Stage 1: Enduring Understandings What are they? EU
    • Sentences that specify what we want students to come to understand about the unit.
    • Have enduring value beyond the classroom.
    • The anchors of the unit and establish the rationale for teaching it.
    • Give meaning and importance to facts.
  • 89. How Enduring Understandings are Written?
    • Build the understandings from the Big Ideas.
    • Write them as statements that the learner will come to understand as the unit unfolds.
    • Write understandings that summarize the insights we want students to come to realize; the “ah-hahs” of the unit or content.
  • 90. Things to keep in mind…
    • Enduring understandings are written for the designer, not the learner.
    • Don’t state the obvious. (Triangles have 3 sides) Facts go into the knowledge box
    • Think of it as “the moral of the story”. (Kind of like the moral of the lesson)
    • Sometimes the understanding is that there is no single, agreed upon understanding. (Ex. Historians disagree about the causes of the civil war.)
  • 91. Most Importantly…
    • The understandings require “uncoverage” because they are not obvious facts!
    • Since it requires uncoverage the understanding should not be understood simply by being stated.
    • Anticipate the misunderstandings!
  • 92. Framing the understandings…
    • Each understanding should begin with the statement:
    • The student will understand that…
    • (This format prevents fact statements from being generated!)
  • 93. Refer to the examples in your binder…
    • Concept attainment sheet
    • Samples of E. U.’s
    • Types of E.U.’s
    • Description sheet
  • 94. Group Activity Time
    • Let’s see some examples.
    • Brainstorm with your content area and develop 2-4 enduring understandings for your selected unit.
    • Share with all!
  • 95. Stage 1: Essential Questions EQ
    • What do you know?
    • Time for a short pre-assessment quiz…
    • (in the binder)
  • 96. Essential Questions
    • “ Essential Questions provide a focus for the lesson
    • or the unit of study. They pull together skills and
    • encourage teachers and students to go much deeper
    • in to the content. Continually posing these guided
    • questions provides opportunities for students to
    • think out of the box and encourages their natural
    • curiosity to surface. This type of inquiry helps
    • students to think about how they personally relate
    • to the topic.”
    • Wiggins and McTighe (1998)
  • 97. Essential Questions
    • See Binder
    • 2 examples
    • Grade level examples (Chapter 10)
    • All focus on pages 85&86
    • Primary focus on pages 88, 89, and 93
    • Elementary/Intermediate pages 89, 90, and 93
    • Middle School focus on pages 90, 91, and 93
    • High School focus on 91, 92, and 93
  • 98. Essential Questions (continued)
    • See Binder
    • Partner Activity
    • More Examples (David Jakes)
    • Essential Question samples (Wiggins)
    • Review of quiz
    • Group Activity
  • 99. E.Q. Group Activity
    • At your table, develop a set (3-5) of
    • essential questions. Please include the
    • following:
    • Course
    • Unit
    • Grade Level
    • 3-5 questions
    • Be prepared to share with all!
  • 100. Enduring Understandings Vs. Essential Questions
    • “ An enduring understanding is a big idea that resides at the heart of a discipline and has lasting value outside the classroom. An essential question is a question that can be answered when the enduring understanding is achieved. “
    • ( http://www.montclair.edu/Detectives/project/EQandEUSummary.htm)
  • 101. Enduring Understandings vs Essential Questions
    • There does not need to be an essential question for each identified understanding, BUT , there should be a clear connection between the Essential Question and the Enduring Understanding.
  • 102. How are E.U’s and E.Q’s related?
    • For more information we turn to the expert himself….. Grant Wiggins!
    • http:// www.authenticeducationonline.org/course/view.php?id =14
  • 103. What is the N.J. Clarifications Project?
    • Grant Wiggins worked with the New Jersey Department of Education to create the E.U.’s and E.Q.’s for all of the content area standards!!!
    • http:// www.nj.gov/education/aps/njscp /
  • 104. Stage 1: Knowledge K
    • Knowledge Box - key facts and details students will know at the end of the unit
    • Preface this box with the sentence: What we want students to know:
    • Examples (see sample units)
  • 105. Stage 1: Skills S
    • These are the actions students will take to uncover the understandings and arrive at answering the questions
    • Think of these as the action verbs (ie. decode, write, analyze, compare..)
    • Preface this box with the sentence: Students will be able to…
    • Examples (see sample units)
  • 106. Stage 2 of Backward Design 1. Identify desired accomplishments 2. Determine acceptable evidence 3. Plan learning experiences & instruction Then and only then
  • 107. Stage 2: Assessment Evidence
    • Given the essential questions, what evidence would show that the learner had deeply considered them?
    • Given the understandings, what would show that the learner “got it”.
    • (Wiggins & McTighe 2005)
  • 108. Just because the student “knows it” …
    • Evidence of understanding is a greater
    • challenge than evidence that the student
    • knows a correct or valid answer.
  • 109. THINK LIKE AN ASSESSOR… http:// www.authenticeducationonline.org/course/view.php?id =14
  • 110. Stage 2 Design Questions
    • What authentic evidence/task for assessment is required by our Stage 1 goals? T
    • What performances are indicative of understanding - transfer of learning and understanding of content via big ideas?
    • What other evidence is required by the goals?
    • OE
    • What scoring rubrics/criteria/indicators will be used to assess student work against the goals?
  • 111. Not the format that matters but what we are looking for !
    • Regardless of the type of test (quiz, essay, observation)
      • what should we look for?
      • where should we look?
      • in order to say - they got it (or didn’t)?
  • 112. We often confuse the drills with the game
    • ‘ Drills’ - test items
      • Short-term objective
      • Out of context
      • Discrete, isolated element
      • set up and prompted for initial simplified learning
      • Doesn’t transfer to new situations on its own
    • The ‘game’ - real task
      • The point of the drills
      • In context, with all its messiness and interest value
      • Requires a repertoire, used wisely
      • Not prompted: you judge what to do, when
  • 113. Refer to Examples in your binder
  • 114. Assess Transfer Through Performance http:// www.authenticeducationonline.org/course/view.php?id =14
  • 115. It only assesses transfer if...
    • The student must draw from a repertoire for a task requiring multiple skills and an array of knowledge
    • The test-giver provides minimal cues, prompts, graphic organizers, etc.
    • The learner must navigate a context - this particular setting, audience, purpose, ‘noise’, etc.
  • 116. Scenarios for Authentic Tasks
    • Build assessments anchored in authentic tasks using GRASPS:
      • G What is the G oal in the scenario?
      • R What is the R ole ?
      • A Who is the A udience ?
      • S What is your S ituation (context)?
      • P What is the P erformance challenge?
      • S By what S tandards will work be judged in the scenario?
    T
  • 117.
    • Refer to Example in your binder
  • 118. Use a Variety of Assessments http:// www.authenticeducationonline.org/course/view.php?id =14
  • 119. 2 validity questions for a practical ‘test of the test’
      • 1. Could the test be passed but without deep understanding?
      • 2. Could the specific test performance be poor but the student still reveal understanding in various ways before, during, and after?
      • The goal is to answer NO to both.
    !
  • 120. Reliability: Snapshot vs. Photo Album
    • We need patterns that overcome
    • inherent measurement error.
      • Sound assessment requires multiple evidence over time - a photo album vs. a single snapshot
  • 121. For Reliability & Sufficiency: Use a Variety of Assessments
    • Varied types, over time:
      • authentic tasks and projects
      • academic exam questions, prompts, and problems
      • quizzes and test items
      • informal checks for understanding
      • student self-assessments
  • 122. Backward Design Process
    • Three Stages of Backward Design
    Stage 1 : Identify desired results Stage 2 : Determine acceptable evidence Stage 3 : ???
  • 123. NOW…
    • What do we do?
  • 124. Final Thoughts….
  • 125. Teachers, do you get frustrated by students who:
    • fail to recall last week’s or even yesterday’s lessons?
    • cannot transfer their learning?
    • don’t have any idea what they are to do?
    • don’t “get it” and ask “dumb questions’?
    • are bored yet otherwise seem bright?
    • Then UbD may be able to help you!
  • 126.
    • Using UbD as an effective tool for
    • unit design should help teachers to
    • teach more efficiently and more
    • effectively.
  • 127.
    • Work Smarter –
    • Not Harder!
  • 128. Curriculum Mapping & Why It’s Important
    • Curriculum mapping can help us all collectively
    • We can “see” what all Verona teachers are doing in their classrooms.
    • Here is the new Verona Curriculum Mapping website:
    • http:// veronaschools.rubiconatlas.org /
  • 129. Where do we go from here?
    • Using the UbD Framework, develop a unit for our follow-up professional day on October 10th
    • Receive related training in Curriculum Mapping from Rubicon Atlas
    • Participate in follow-up professional development meetings with other staff & today’s trainers
    • Utilize the UbD wiki http://www.veronaubd.wetpaint.com
    • You can do it – We can help!
  • 130. Final Thoughts or Questions
    • Questions? Anyone, anyone?
    • Thanks for being such a great group of professional learners!
    • Utilize the resources! We are in this together!
  • 131. UbD as a Tool for Effective Unit Design Day 3 Presented by Connie Petner, Libby Skinner, Gina Venezia, Bob Cashill, Tom White, Glenn Cesa, Anthony Lanzo, Rich Rampolla
  • 132. Welcome Back!
    • Would anyone like to share anything you have experienced as you have worked on your units?
  • 133. Quick Review: Stage 1
    • What are the 5 parts of stage 1?
    • What are some qualities you must consider when create E.U’s?
    • What are some key characteristics of E.Q.’s?
    • Is there an entry point for stage 1?