<ul><li>Come to the edge, He said, They said, We are afraid. Come to the edge, He said. They came. He pushed them… And the...
Understanding by Design A way of thinking about teaching and learning!
Describe a negative assessment/learning experience. What were the qualities?
What is exemplary assessment/learning experience? Describe the characteristics of an exemplary assessment experience.
Qualities of Exemplary Assessment <ul><li>Persistence </li></ul><ul><li>Learn from mistakes </li></ul><ul><li>Fun </li></u...
Why do we assess?
Core Premise The aim of assessment is to improve student performance, not merely audit it. - Grant Wiggins
Assessment must be: <ul><li>Credible </li></ul><ul><li>Balanced </li></ul><ul><li>Intellectual-ly Rigorous </li></ul><ul><...
Credible <ul><li>Assessment results must be clear to and respected by all key constituencies </li></ul><ul><li>-Students <...
Balanced <ul><li>Reform is not about “either-or” in assessment </li></ul><ul><li>Every method of assessment has a place </...
Honest yet Fair <ul><li>Assessment must be balanced. </li></ul><ul><li>Honesty- accurate reporting the level of achievemen...
Useful <ul><li>Primary “user” is the student </li></ul><ul><li>Assessment must provide more helpful feedback </li></ul><ul...
Intellectually Rigorous <ul><li>Genuine competence and sophisticated understanding required </li></ul><ul><li>Curriculum a...
Feasible <ul><li>Making form follow function </li></ul><ul><li>A schedule designed for good assessment </li></ul><ul><li>U...
Assessment is central to learning <ul><li>Not “after” teaching and learning are over: learning- </li></ul><ul><li>Assessme...
Assessment must be educative <ul><li>Test can and must “teach”, not just measure </li></ul><ul><li>Authentic tasks, criter...
We assess what we value, we value what we assess.
Reality <ul><li>The things we value the most are the hardest to assess  </li></ul><ul><li>The things we value the least ar...
Understanding How do we know one truly understands?
-J. Piaget  <ul><li>“ Real comprehension of a notion or a theory implies reinvention of this theory by the student.  Once ...
Teaching for Understanding or Coverage? <ul><li>Avoid mere coverage </li></ul><ul><li>Avoid The egocentric fallacy: I taug...
You don’t really understand something unless you can… <ul><li>Avoid common misconceptions or simplistic views </li></ul><u...
Understanding <ul><li>Depth of insight and sophisticated explanation </li></ul><ul><li>Perspective </li></ul><ul><li>Empat...
What are the levels of understanding? <ul><li>Sophisticated </li></ul><ul><li>Good/Solid </li></ul><ul><li>Knowledge but n...
Design Backwards  Start with the end in mind!
Three stages <ul><li>Identify desired results </li></ul><ul><li>Evidence </li></ul><ul><li>Instructional Plan </li></ul>
What do you want your students to understand?
Designs for Understanding <ul><li>The designs must cause students to dig deeper and revisit ideas </li></ul><ul><li>The de...
What will serve as evidence of understanding? <ul><li>Performance Assessment </li></ul><ul><li>Products/Performances </li>...
How can you make your performance assessment authentic? <ul><li>Goal </li></ul><ul><li>Role </li></ul><ul><li>Audience </l...
Authentic, Elaborated <ul><li>Performance is always in “messy” context </li></ul><ul><li>Good judgment required </li></ul>...
Feedback <ul><li>Key to Improving Student Performance! </li></ul>
From the Harvard Assessment Seminars 1990 <ul><li>“The big point—it comes up over and over again as crucial—is the importa...
Harvard Assessment cont’d <ul><li>“ Students offer the suggestion that it should be possible in certain courses to get  im...
Harvard assessment cont’d <ul><li>“Secondly… an overwhelming majority are convinced that their best learning takes place w...
Research by John Hattie (1992) <ul><li>His findings: </li></ul><ul><li>Providing students with  specific information about...
Indicators of an effective feedback system <ul><li>Learners seek out feedback.  They welcome and do not fear or resist it....
Rubrics Pigs Don’t Get Fat by Weighing Them
What is a rubric? <ul><li>A rubric is a set of guidelines for scoring performance against criteria </li></ul><ul><li>Perfo...
Kinds of rubrics <ul><li>Different rubrics serve different needs </li></ul><ul><li>Holistic-Analytical </li></ul><ul><li>D...
Holistic vs. Analytic <ul><li>Efficiency vs. effectiveness trade-offs </li></ul><ul><li>Holistic: a single descriptor and ...
Stage 3- Learning Plan <ul><li>W-Where </li></ul><ul><li>H-Hook </li></ul><ul><li>E-Equip </li></ul><ul><li>R-Rethink </li...
How People Learn <ul><li>How does the WHERETO ensure improved student performance? </li></ul>
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Ubd Toolbox Powerpoint Presentation

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  • Casey,
    I've been working with UBD since 1999 and am really impressed with your presentation. I'd love to know what types of active involvement you use when working with teachers when presenting/refining their use and understanding of UBD.
    Amy
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  • Great quote! Impact understanding by design and assessment for learning can have on student performance.
  • Ubd Toolbox Powerpoint Presentation

    1. 1. <ul><li>Come to the edge, He said, They said, We are afraid. Come to the edge, He said. They came. He pushed them… And they flew! </li></ul><ul><li>Guillame Appolinaire (1880-1919) </li></ul>
    2. 2. Understanding by Design A way of thinking about teaching and learning!
    3. 3. Describe a negative assessment/learning experience. What were the qualities?
    4. 4. What is exemplary assessment/learning experience? Describe the characteristics of an exemplary assessment experience.
    5. 5. Qualities of Exemplary Assessment <ul><li>Persistence </li></ul><ul><li>Learn from mistakes </li></ul><ul><li>Fun </li></ul><ul><li>Challenging </li></ul><ul><li>Immediate Feedback </li></ul><ul><li>Authentic </li></ul><ul><li>Need Evidence </li></ul><ul><li>Collaborative </li></ul><ul><li>Do over time </li></ul><ul><li>Apply to a new context </li></ul><ul><li>Personal </li></ul><ul><li>Audience </li></ul><ul><li>Goal-setting </li></ul><ul><li>Knows expectations </li></ul><ul><li>Learned from it </li></ul>
    6. 6. Why do we assess?
    7. 7. Core Premise The aim of assessment is to improve student performance, not merely audit it. - Grant Wiggins
    8. 8. Assessment must be: <ul><li>Credible </li></ul><ul><li>Balanced </li></ul><ul><li>Intellectual-ly Rigorous </li></ul><ul><li>Feasible </li></ul><ul><li>Honest yet Fair </li></ul><ul><li>Useful </li></ul>
    9. 9. Credible <ul><li>Assessment results must be clear to and respected by all key constituencies </li></ul><ul><li>-Students </li></ul><ul><li>-Parents </li></ul><ul><li>-Teachers </li></ul><ul><li>-School boards </li></ul><ul><li>-Policy-makers </li></ul>
    10. 10. Balanced <ul><li>Reform is not about “either-or” in assessment </li></ul><ul><li>Every method of assessment has a place </li></ul><ul><li>The aim is to expand the repertoire and correct the current imbalance </li></ul><ul><li>Each method of assessment is limited and flawed </li></ul><ul><li>A goal is to better assess depth of understanding and genuine competence. </li></ul>
    11. 11. Honest yet Fair <ul><li>Assessment must be balanced. </li></ul><ul><li>Honesty- accurate reporting the level of achievement against standards </li></ul><ul><li>Fairness- apt weighing of performer’s prior experience against reasonable expectations </li></ul><ul><li>A single-score or letter grades is thus inadequate </li></ul>
    12. 12. Useful <ul><li>Primary “user” is the student </li></ul><ul><li>Assessment must provide more helpful feedback </li></ul><ul><li>Tests the test: student should be able to self-adjust with increasing effectiveness if the system is working </li></ul><ul><li>Data-drive staff meetings </li></ul>
    13. 13. Intellectually Rigorous <ul><li>Genuine competence and sophisticated understanding required </li></ul><ul><li>Curriculum anchored by demanding and authentic tasks </li></ul><ul><li>Tasks must be designed to require quality work </li></ul><ul><li>Effective know-how,not just superficial textbook knowledge </li></ul><ul><li>Accurate and precise use of core knowledge,not tasks requiring merely generic skill </li></ul><ul><li>Effective performances, not just good-faith </li></ul><ul><li>efforts </li></ul><ul><li>Rigor through assessment design standards and performance standards, not just content standards </li></ul>
    14. 14. Feasible <ul><li>Making form follow function </li></ul><ul><li>A schedule designed for good assessment </li></ul><ul><li>Use of technology and personnel wisely </li></ul><ul><li>R&D part of the job description and appraisal </li></ul><ul><li>On-going training and peer review of designs </li></ul>
    15. 15. Assessment is central to learning <ul><li>Not “after” teaching and learning are over: learning- </li></ul><ul><li>Assessment/Instruction seamless </li></ul><ul><li>Requires a recursive, not a linear curriculum </li></ul><ul><li>Through cycles of model-practice-feedback-revision-perform-feedback </li></ul>
    16. 16. Assessment must be educative <ul><li>Test can and must “teach”, not just measure </li></ul><ul><li>Authentic tasks, criteria standards, contexts </li></ul><ul><li>Effective feedback built in </li></ul><ul><li>Self-assessment and self-correction </li></ul><ul><li>assessed </li></ul><ul><li>Based on valid, powerful exemplars and models </li></ul>
    17. 17. We assess what we value, we value what we assess.
    18. 18. Reality <ul><li>The things we value the most are the hardest to assess </li></ul><ul><li>The things we value the least are the easiest to assess </li></ul>
    19. 19. Understanding How do we know one truly understands?
    20. 20. -J. Piaget <ul><li>“ Real comprehension of a notion or a theory implies reinvention of this theory by the student. Once the child is capable of repeating certain notions and using some applications of these in a learning situations he often gives the impression of understanding; however this does not fulfill the condition of reinvention. True understanding manifests itself by new spontaneous applications.” </li></ul>
    21. 21. Teaching for Understanding or Coverage? <ul><li>Avoid mere coverage </li></ul><ul><li>Avoid The egocentric fallacy: I taught, so they must have learned. </li></ul><ul><li>Do integrate assessment and instruction </li></ul><ul><li>Do reconsider ideas </li></ul>
    22. 22. You don’t really understand something unless you can… <ul><li>Avoid common misconceptions or simplistic views </li></ul><ul><li>Acts on it effectively in different cases and contexts </li></ul><ul><li>Verify it </li></ul><ul><li>Defend it </li></ul><ul><li>Critique it </li></ul><ul><li>Teach it </li></ul><ul><li>Reveal its power and its limits </li></ul><ul><li>Apply to novel situations </li></ul>
    23. 23. Understanding <ul><li>Depth of insight and sophisticated explanation </li></ul><ul><li>Perspective </li></ul><ul><li>Empathy </li></ul><ul><li>Contextual “savvy” (performance know-how) </li></ul><ul><li>Self-knowledge </li></ul>
    24. 24. What are the levels of understanding? <ul><li>Sophisticated </li></ul><ul><li>Good/Solid </li></ul><ul><li>Knowledge but naïve </li></ul><ul><li>Misunderstanding </li></ul>
    25. 25. Design Backwards Start with the end in mind!
    26. 26. Three stages <ul><li>Identify desired results </li></ul><ul><li>Evidence </li></ul><ul><li>Instructional Plan </li></ul>
    27. 27. What do you want your students to understand?
    28. 28. Designs for Understanding <ul><li>The designs must cause students to dig deeper and revisit ideas </li></ul><ul><li>The design must provide reasons and opportunities to rethink what one “know” </li></ul>
    29. 29. What will serve as evidence of understanding? <ul><li>Performance Assessment </li></ul><ul><li>Products/Performances </li></ul><ul><li>Test/quiz </li></ul><ul><li>Self-Assessment </li></ul><ul><li>Checks of Understanding </li></ul>
    30. 30. How can you make your performance assessment authentic? <ul><li>Goal </li></ul><ul><li>Role </li></ul><ul><li>Audience </li></ul><ul><li>Situation </li></ul><ul><li>Product/Performance </li></ul><ul><li>Standard </li></ul>
    31. 31. Authentic, Elaborated <ul><li>Performance is always in “messy” context </li></ul><ul><li>Good judgment required </li></ul><ul><li>Realistic (vs. unrealistic) constraints </li></ul><ul><li>Performance options </li></ul><ul><li>Inherent distractions </li></ul><ul><li>Competing purposes </li></ul><ul><li>Appropriate resources not given, but available </li></ul><ul><li>Arbitrary secrecy minimized </li></ul>
    32. 32. Feedback <ul><li>Key to Improving Student Performance! </li></ul>
    33. 33. From the Harvard Assessment Seminars 1990 <ul><li>“The big point—it comes up over and over again as crucial—is the importance of quick and detailed feedback. Students overwhelmingly report that the single most important ingredient for making a course effective is getting rapid response on assignments and quizzes. </li></ul>
    34. 34. Harvard Assessment cont’d <ul><li>“ Students offer the suggestion that it should be possible in certain courses to get immediate feedback. They suggest that the professor should hand out an example of an excellent answer. </li></ul>
    35. 35. Harvard assessment cont’d <ul><li>“Secondly… an overwhelming majority are convinced that their best learning takes place when they have chance to submit an early version of their work, get detailed feedback and criticism, and then hand in a final revised version… Many students observe that their most memorable experiences have come from courses where such opportunities are routine policy. </li></ul>
    36. 36. Research by John Hattie (1992) <ul><li>His findings: </li></ul><ul><li>Providing students with specific information about their standing in terms of particular objectives increased their achievement by 37 percentile points! </li></ul><ul><li>“The most powerful single innovation that enhances achievement is FEEDBACK. The simplest prescription for improving education must be ‘dollops of feedback’.” </li></ul>
    37. 37. Indicators of an effective feedback system <ul><li>Learners seek out feedback. They welcome and do not fear or resist it. </li></ul><ul><li>Learner performance improves at all levels, especially novice </li></ul><ul><li>Improved performance occurs more rapidly than expected </li></ul><ul><li>Few quarrels about the results;disputes grounded in evidence </li></ul><ul><li>Revision opportunities and coaching built into the curriculum and assessment systems </li></ul><ul><li>Norms and standards rise overtime; what was once considered extraordinary performance becomes more common </li></ul>
    38. 38. Rubrics Pigs Don’t Get Fat by Weighing Them
    39. 39. What is a rubric? <ul><li>A rubric is a set of guidelines for scoring performance against criteria </li></ul><ul><li>Performance is described along a scale of quality </li></ul><ul><li>Descriptors are provided for each level of performance </li></ul><ul><li>Descriptions provide general traits and concrete indicators to make each level clear (and scoring reliable), avoiding mere comparative and evaluative language when possible. </li></ul>
    40. 40. Kinds of rubrics <ul><li>Different rubrics serve different needs </li></ul><ul><li>Holistic-Analytical </li></ul><ul><li>Developmental/longitudinal </li></ul><ul><li>Criterion-specific- Genre -specific </li></ul>
    41. 41. Holistic vs. Analytic <ul><li>Efficiency vs. effectiveness trade-offs </li></ul><ul><li>Holistic: a single descriptor and score for a complex performance </li></ul><ul><li>Analytical-trait: separate scores for distinct performance </li></ul>
    42. 42. Stage 3- Learning Plan <ul><li>W-Where </li></ul><ul><li>H-Hook </li></ul><ul><li>E-Equip </li></ul><ul><li>R-Rethink </li></ul><ul><li>E-Evaluation </li></ul><ul><li>T-Tailor </li></ul><ul><li>O-Organize </li></ul>
    43. 43. How People Learn <ul><li>How does the WHERETO ensure improved student performance? </li></ul>

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