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Who's Who In Sports Medicine
Who's Who In Sports Medicine
Who's Who In Sports Medicine
Who's Who In Sports Medicine
Who's Who In Sports Medicine
Who's Who In Sports Medicine
Who's Who In Sports Medicine
Who's Who In Sports Medicine
Who's Who In Sports Medicine
Who's Who In Sports Medicine
Who's Who In Sports Medicine
Who's Who In Sports Medicine
Who's Who In Sports Medicine
Who's Who In Sports Medicine
Who's Who In Sports Medicine
Who's Who In Sports Medicine
Who's Who In Sports Medicine
Who's Who In Sports Medicine
Who's Who In Sports Medicine
Who's Who In Sports Medicine
Who's Who In Sports Medicine
Who's Who In Sports Medicine
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Who's Who In Sports Medicine

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  • 1. Who’s Who in Sports Medicine History Casey Christy, MA, ATC, CSCS
  • 2. Henry Gray  Authored Gray’s Anatomy Text  He published the first edition at the age of 31 in 1858  Still widely regarded as most comprehensive Anatomy text  Died of smallpox at the young age of 34  Lived most of his life in London
  • 3. Jacques Lisfranc de St. Martin  Pioneering French surgeon (and gynecologist!)  The Lisfranc joint and Lisfranc injury are named after him.  First described the Lisfranc Injury in 1815 after the War of the Sixth Coalition.  Lived from 1790-1847
  • 4. James Robinson  Recognized as first athletic trainer in United States  Had veterinary background – born in England  First worked at Harvard in 1881, later Princeton & Yale  Known to rush onto field with water bucket & sponge to “freshen up” tired player  1885-86 Princeton annual salary was $750, half paid by alumni
  • 5. Samuel Bilik  Wrote first “Athletic Training” book in 1917, sold for $.75  Book later titled the “Trainers Bible”  Russia-born, worked as Assistant Athletic Trainer, University of Illinois  Later became a doctor  Help form & fund the EATA
  • 6. Cramer Brothers  Chuck and Frank Cramer founded Cramer Products in 1918  Began selling homemade “athletic liniment” made in mom’s kitchen to coaches  Supported first NATA meeting in 1950
  • 7. John Lachman  Graduated from Temple University and Temple School of Medicine  Discovered ACL integrity was more easily determined with the knee closer to extension than in the position used in the classic anterior drawer test
  • 8. Stanley Hoppenfeld  A pioneer in the field of spine surgery  Founding Director of Scoliosis Associates in New York.  Authored the classic text Physical Examination of the Spine and the Extremities
  • 9. Daniel Arnheim  Authored classic text Principles of Athletic Training used by probably anyone who is in the field of athletic training
  • 10. Gabe Mirkin  First to coin the phrase “RICE,” rest, ice, compression, elevation for the acute care of athletic injuries in The Sports Medicine Book written in 1978.  Harvard University Graduate  Board-certified in 4 specialties: sportsmedicine, allergy and immunology, pediatrics and pediatric immunology
  • 11. Joe Torg  Graduated from Temple University School of Medicine  Ground-breaking research on cervical spine axial loading during head down tackle lead to football rule change in 1976 outlawing spearing  His research lead to a significant decrease in football related catastrophic cervical spine injuries
  • 12. “Pinky” Newell  “The Father of Modern Athletic Training”  Founding member of NATA  Served as NATA executive secretary from 1955-1968  Served as athletic trainer at Purdue University  EATA has annual “Pinky Newell Address”  1920-1984
  • 13. Gail Weldon  First female inducted into the NATA Hall of Fame (posthumously 1995)  First female athletic trainer hired by US Olympic committee  First female chief athletic trainer for US Olympic Team 1980  2nd woman to join NATA; one of first 10 women ever certified  1951-1991
  • 14. Bobby Gunn  First elected president in NATA history 1970  Head athletic trainer at Lamar University before working with the Washington Redskins and Houston Oilers
  • 15. Marsha Grant-Ford  First certified female African-American  Rowan University Athletic Training Program Director 1996-2001  Instrumental in Rowan’s CAAHEP accreditation 2001  Widely published in publications such as Athletic Therapy Today, Journal of Athletic Training and the American Journal of Sportsmedicine
  • 16. Chuck Whedon  Head Athletic Trainer Glassboro State College/Rowan University 1986-2011  Inspired, instructed and mentored numerous athletic training students  Served in several positions for the Athletic Trainers’ Society of NJ including president and governmental relations committee chair  Instrumental in passage of NJ Athletic Training Licensure Act and subsequent revision removing site restriction and allowing athletic trainers to work in any setting in NJ  Volunteer AT for United States Olympic Committee
  • 17. Otho Davis  Served as NATA executive director from 1971 to 1989  Served as Philadelphia Eagles athletic trainer from 1973-1995  Named to All Madden Team as athletic trainer in 1999  First athletic trainer to be nominated to Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2009  NATA headquarters named in his honor  1934-2000
  • 18. Richard Malacrea  A founding member of the ATSNJ 1975  Spent 20 years as head athletic trainer at Princeton University  Appointed by the governor to the chair the Legislative Committee of Advisors to the Board of Medical Examiners  Instrumental in ATSNJ, scholarship named in his honor  Inducted into the NATA Hall of Fame 1992
  • 19. Eve Becker-Doyle  First female NATA executive director 1992  Wrote Leadership Isn’t Rocket Science: 6 Ways To Boost Your Leadership IQ
  • 20. Other Female Firsts  Dorothy “Dot” Cohen, a graduate student, become the first woman to join the NATA in 1966  Sherry Bagagian is the first woman to sit for the NATA certification exam in 1972  Janice Daniels is the first woman elected to the NATA Board in 1984  Julie Max is the first woman elected as NATA president in 2000 Julie Max
  • 21. Sue Falsone  First female head athletic trainer in Major League Baseball (LA Dodgers 2012)  First female head athletic trainer in any of the four major professional sports (baseball, football, basketball, hockey)  She received her bachelor’s degree in physical therapy from Daemen College In Amherst, NY, and her Master’s from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.  She also is a certified athletic trainer and a certified strength and conditioning specialist.
  • 22. Matt Webber  Athletic Training historian who has brought AT history to life via his book Dropping the Bucket and Sponge  High School Athletic Trainer for over 30 years  Served as president of the Arizona Athletic Trainers’ Association and helped implement state AT licensure laws  Served on the NATA Board of Directors; NATA Hall of Fame member www.athletictraininghistory.com

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