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Sim & Dif In Lead Gen X & Y
 

Sim & Dif In Lead Gen X & Y

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A Study of Similarities and Differences in Leading Generation X and Y in 2010.

A Study of Similarities and Differences in Leading Generation X and Y in 2010.

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  • Both generations have similar and difference characteristics that require a successful leader to understand these traits and provide specific leadership styles that are unique to each generation. One of the biggest line item in the HR and corporation budget is payroll. But without employees, most corporations would not be able to stay in business so understanding the different characteristics of the generations is important to effectively lead these generationsCorporations lose millions of dollars in recruitment and turnover costs because employees do not feel engaged and leave.
  • Born from parents from Silent and Baby Boomers, according to Johnson and Johnson “In the 70’s, 50% of these marriages ended in divorce”, this meant that roughly half of all Gen X’ers witnessed the dissolution of their families” (2010, p.64.)With the beginning of the pill and women becoming more empowered, having children became unhip Gen X has the smallest birth rate.
  • Thisgeneration “grew up scared and untrusting as a result of such events such as Watergate, Iran Contra Iran Contra, the threat of Nuclear warfare, bomb scares, Castro, and even AIDS (p. 98) They learned that politics never solved anything and usually made things worse, therefore they are untrusting of anyone or anything” as cited in (Gravett & Thrickmorton, 2007, p 110). Conversely, their outlook in the workplace can reflect a sometimes, pessimistic or unrealistic demeanor.
  • Unlike their Brethren, Gen Y; they do not synthesize with technology who eat, sleep and breath technology.
  • Capko claims that Gen Xer’s strive for a balance between work and life and are motivated by freedom to do things their way (2010). Catalyst (2005) a long-time women’s organization describes; “Gen Xers have several reasons for wanting to use alternative work schedules. The top reason was to meet childcare responsibilities, followed by the ability to attend school, personal health and personal reasons unrelated to the family” (p. 39).
  • This group believes that work for them is a shared mission to meet and exceed a company’s goal’s and mission.
  • Generation X have been considered as sheltered. Their parents had a “Baby on Board” bumper sticker in their car’s back window and every comfort and safety aid at their fingertips
  • “Parental control can be found in car monitoring devices to their own Facebook accounts as a means of tracking their child’s online activity. In addition, parents are quick to come to the their child’s defense. Some parents have go so far as to shield their children from consequences of their actions. If Johnny hasn’t done his homework, they’ll do it for him. These parents often refuse to let their children learn that life requires some “heavy lifting” Then they wonder why their kids won’t take responsibility for themselves. (Johnson & Johnson, 2010 p.105)”With so much encouraging affirmation from mom and dad and other authority figures, this generation is very self-assured about their future. They believe their success will translate into triumph for the environment and civilization as whole
  • With so much encouraging affirmation from mom and dad and other authority figures, this generation is very self-assured about their future. They believe their success will translate into triumph for the environment and civilization as whole.Their outlook on life “Social analysts say that as a civic generation, Millenials are more inclined to light candles than curse the darkness. This generation says ‘These institutions are broken, we fix them” (Brownsteine, Baron, Clark, Freedman, Harder & Jerome 2010 p. 9).
  • Making up 41% of the US population and most 50% of the full-time workplace” Resenweits & Iyer, 2001, p.91)Typically team-oriented, banding together to date and socialize rather than pairing off“The Millennial, multi-tasker may text, talk, listen to music but that doesn’t mean they are retaining information” McAlister, 2009, p.34)Respond well to personal attention
  • These cohorts are known as “champion contortionist” (Johnson & Johnson, 2010) when it comes to having a balanced life. They are not satisfied with the typical 9 to 5 structured, 4-wall compartment that feels restrictive and monotonous. Technology has given them the ability to work smarter not longer. With the invention of the smart phone, this group can multitask no other previous generationGravett & Throckmorton, (2007) explains that this generation, “are extremely conscious of the environment. They worry about the future, not just locally, but globally and actively engage and encourage acts of recyclying and reducing waste or pollutants” (p.98) Consequently Generation Y wants to do what right for Mother Earth and mankind which are important factors in choosing and staying with a company. (Johnson & Johnson)
  • When technology does not measure up they get impatient and can lead to dissatisaction with the organization and cause for further attrition

Sim & Dif In Lead Gen X & Y Sim & Dif In Lead Gen X & Y Presentation Transcript

  • A Study of Similarities and Differences in Leading Generation X and Y
    Presented by: Caryn Bursey
  • Problem
    Both generations have similar and different characteristics and need specific leadership styles
    One of the biggest reasons employees leave an organization is their supervisor (Gravett & Throckmorton, 2006)
    Payroll is one of the biggest line items in HR & Corporate Budget
    Corporations lose millions of dollars in recruitment and turnover costs.
  • GENERATION Defined
    GENERATION: “Each Generation is a group of individuals born and living contemporaneously who have common knowledge and experience that affects their thoughts, attitudes, values, beliefs and behaviors” (Johnson & Johnson, p.6., 2010)
  • Generation X Defined
    Simons (2010), defines Generation X as “People born between 1964 and 1977” (p.30).
    Also known as: Latch-key Kids, Sandwich Generation, Baby Busters and more.
    Latch-key kids? It is estimated that 40% of children were given a key to there home to fend for themselves (Johnson & Johnson, 2010)
  • Gen X History
    “In the 70’s, 50% of these marriages ended in divorce”, this meant that roughly half of all Gen X’ers witnessed the dissolution of their families” (2010, p.64.)
    Gen X has the smallest birth rate (Simon, 2010, Mcalister, 2009).
  • Things That Defined Generation X
  • Generation X Characteristics
    They are self sufficient, pliable and flexible.
    • Xer’s have learned to do things for themselves and handle problems on their own.
    • Dislike authority and rigid work requirements
    I don't need someone looking over my shoulder
    Work well in multicultural settings
    Practical approach to getting things done
    “Live for today” mentality
  • Generation X – Values and Work Ethic
    Diversity
    Thinking globally
    Balance
    Techno-literacy
    Fun
    Informality
    Self-reliance
    “differently oriented toward work”
    “just a job”
    Flexible hours, informal work environment, just the right amount of supervision
    Multi-tasking
    Give them lots to do and freedom to do it their way
  • What makes them tick?
    They tend to avoid corporate politics – they have no orientation for this
    They are generally not very interested in traditional perks
    They are usually motivated by the prospect of independence, the lack of corporate structure, a lack of rigidity, and the latest technological advances
    Unlike their Brethren, Gen Y; they do not “synthesize” with technology.
  • The Myths surrounding Gen X
    Higher Salary is more important than work balance.
    Gen Xer’s strive for a balance between work and life and are motivated by freedom to do things their way.
    Catalyst (2005) a long-time women’s organization describes; “Gen Xers have several reasons for wanting to use alternative work schedules”.
    The top reason was to meet childcare responsibilities, followed by the ability to attend school, personal health and personal reasons unrelated to the family” (p. 39).
  • The Myths surrounding Gen X
    They are arrogant
    They are intensely self-confident and sometimes taken for arrogant, but rather children who have had to solve problems on their own. (Minerd, 2009)
  • The Myths surrounding Gen X
    They’re not willing to work hard.
    In interviews, Gen Xers consistently tell us they are willing to work very hard. They don’t want to be taken advantage of, though. Many believe it’s unfair to expect a seventy-hour week for forty hours of pay. And, as a generation, they’re committed to having a life beyond work.
    Adapted from Claire Raines, Beyond Generation X (Menlo Park, CA: Crisp Publications, 1997)
  • The Myths surrounding Gen X
    They’re living on easy street.
    In the 1950s, young homeowners could make the monthly mortgage payment by using 14% of their income. Today it takes 40%. And today, folks older than sixty will get back about $200 for every $100 they put into Social Security. Gen Xers will lose more than $100 for every $450 they contribute.
    Adapted from Claire Raines, Beyond Generation X (Menlo Park, CA: Crisp Publications, 1997)
  • Generation X key characteristics they want in their leaders
    Approachable
    Actively listens to their ideas, suggestions and needs
    Is supportive of the need for a life outside of work
    Has a high level of integrity
    Provides regular feedback beyond the annual review
    Doesn’t micro-manage but let’s them do their job and ask for help if necessary
  • Generation Y Defined
    “People born between 1978 and 1994” according to Mcalister (2009, p13) and Simon, (2010, p33).
    Other names for this group are Generation Xs, Echo Boomers, Digital Generation, Nexters, Helicopter Kids, Baby-on-Board, etc.
    Baby-on-Board?
    BABY ON BOARD!
  • Gen Y History
    Born from Parents of young Baby Boomers and Generation X, from birth this generation has taken a place of priority in the world.
    Parental Control, Tracking, Children’s Defense
    RESULT: Lack of Consequences, Little Responsibility & No heavy lifting (Johnson & Johnson, 2010)
  • Things That Defined Generation Y
  • Generation Y Characteristics
    • “Make up 41% of the US population and most 50% of the full-time workplace” Resenweits & Iyer, 2001, p.91)
    • Typically team-oriented, banding together to date and socialize rather than pairing off
    • “They text, talk, listen to music but that doesn’t mean they are retaining information” McAlister, 2009, p.34)
    • Respond well to personal attention
  • Gen Y - Expectations
    Accustomed to working away from their desks, using computers, smartphones, and laptops (Mcalister, 2009)
    Are extremely conscious of the environment (Gravett & Throckmorton, 2007
    “Unlike Gen X predecessors who saw job hopping as the road to success, Gen Y more often wants to move in the confines of the company (Johnson & Johnson, 2010, p.71)
  • What Generation Y Learned from Video Games
    Increased problem-solving and decision-making
    Speed and a sense of urgency provide motivation
    Video games
    Provide rapid feedback
    Adjust the level of difficulty to the expertise of the player
    Allow the player to explore situations and create unique scenarios
  • So This is Why They Call it Generation Y
  • Generation Y or aka: Digital Generation
    • 97% of Gen Y own a computer
    • 94% own a cell phone
    • 76% use instant messaging
    • 69% have a Facebook account
    • 44% read blogs
    • 34% use Web sites as their primary source of news.
    According to Net.generation
  • Generation Y Techie Behavior
    81% use email to keep in touch with friends and family
    78% believe the internet helps them with work
    70% use instant messaging to keep in touch
    56% prefer the internet over the telephone
    55% use email to arrange face-to-face meetings
    According to Net.Generation
  • Generation Y in the workplace
    • Prefer group work and experiential activities
    • Expect structure in the workplace
    • Have a reliance on testing that focuses on facts and may result in less critical thinking skills
    • Expect organization and compelling engagement
    • Need the feeling of connection and feedback, and want it quickly
  • Differences between Gen Y & Gen X
  • What are effective leadership practices for Gen X?
  • What are effective leadership practices for Gen Y?
  • What are Effective Leadership Practices for Gen X and Gen Y?
  • Recommended Action Plan
    Gain knowledge and understanding of characteristics of both generations.
    Use audits, group meetings or exercise to understand the gaps.
    Understand that these generations will not put up with the demanding socially isolating, personally draining environment of the past.
    Educate, implement and track suggested leadership best practices
  • Questions?
  • Resources
    • Barone, C (N.D.) The new academy. Retrieved from http://www.educause.edu/Resources/EducatingtheNetGeneration
    • BTW RU Plugged In? Engaging the Millennial Student http://class.ccaurora.edu/twt/CCA%20presentation%20Engaging%20Millennial%20students.pdf
    • Engaging the four generations of workers: A leader’s guide to baby boomers http://www.ddiworld.com/pdf/engagingthefourgenerationsofworkers_aleadersguidetobabyboomers_ar_ddi.pdf
    • 5 Ways to Sell to Baby Boomers http://www.thegenxfiles.com/tag/selling
    • Frand, Jason. (2000). The Information Age Mindset: Changes in Students and Implications for Higher Education. EDUCAUSE Review 35(5), 15-24.
    • GENERATIONS “ Speaking their Language” http://www.caccrao.org/docs/Presentation%20Generations%20Speaking%20Their%20Language.ppt
    • Generational Learning Preferences: A Primer http://www.regislearning.com/htm/genlearning.html
  • Resources
    • Oblinger, D. (July/August 2003). Boomers, gen-xers, Generation X: Understanding the new students. Educause
    • Oblinger, D. Oblinger, J.  Is it age or IT: First steps toward understanding the net generation.http://www.educause.edu/IsItAgeorIT%3AFirstStepsTowardUnderstandingtheNetGeneration/6058
    • Reach Students Online http://www.reachstudentsonline.org/know-your-market.html
    • Roberts, G.R. (N.D.) Technology and learning expectations of the net generation. Retrieved from http://www.educause.edu
    • The Internet and Education: Findings of the Pew Internet and American Life Project http://www.pewinternet.org/reports/pdfs/PIP_Schools_Report.pdf
    • The Internet Goes to College: How Students are Living in the Future with Today’s Technology http://www.pewInternet.org/reports/toc.asp?Report=71