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Leadershipcredoppt

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  • Presently, the leadership required for organizations embodies authenticity and partnership; aligning values, vision, resources, and commitment as organizations gain momentum in the midst of transformation.
  • To answer these questions, I investigate my values, skills, and ambitions.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Authentic Leadership Credo Caryn Auriel University of St. Thomas April 2011
    • 2. Introduction  Call For New Leadership: • In my paper, I explore my leadership awareness, strengths, values, and development in order to optimize my leadership essence. • It is concerned with facilitation, service, and partnership. • Throughout the paper, I utilize a student employment initiative; weaving the learning process for strategic leadership, moral leadership application, and key elements of my leadership development.
    • 3. Figure 1 illuminates the inter-connectedness between the alignment of my values, purpose, and behavior to the strategic learning process created by Hughes and Beatty (2005). It also serves as a framework for the arrangement of my paper.
    • 4. At My Best • Knowing who I am and how to be my authentic self is the essence of alignment between values, goals, and behavior. • What kind of facilitator do I want to be? • What are my aspirations? • See Table 1 below as an illustration of how each one of my values and assessment themes are intricately knit.
    • 5. Myers-Briggs (ENFP) Personality type RBS Values Behind my person type StrengthsFinder Natural talent foundation Career Leader Competencies and ambitions Extroversion: Directing energy mainly toward the world of people and objects. Enthusiastic Service Influential Connectedness: Listen and share thoughts. Relator: Have closeness with others. Manage/Influence People Intuition: Focus on perceiving patterns and interrelationships; concentrating on meanings and possibilities. Positive Cooperation Creative Positivity: Upbeat, creative to engender enthusiasm. Futuristic: See the possibilities. Creative Production Feeling: Value-based decision making with consideration for others. Empathy/Compassion Respect Empathy: An understanding of others. Individuation: Appreciate everyone’s uniqueness. Mentoring and Counseling Perceiving: Open and adaptable to change and a high value for spontaneity. Tenacity Adaptable Commitment Adaptability: Live in the moment. Strategic: See alternatives. Theory and Conceptual Thinking
    • 6. Strategic Thinking, Acting, and Influencing • Strategic Acting integrates mindful listening and moral values to implement thinking into action. • Leaders that I consider admirable role models have translated ideas into action for the good of the whole. • It is my intent to model the same by setting clear priorities and creating space for learning and risk taking.
    • 7. Both Hughes and Beatty’s (2005) learning process and Block’s (1996) stewardship strategy are integral to my leadership vision and mission: • To increase moral and ethical awareness, building relationships that promote self-understanding and development (personally, emotionally, socially, professionally and spiritually). • It is my desire to play a critical role to collaboratively assist others in the transformation process by bringing a genuine positive intent to the table. • I see myself facilitating transformation through trusting relationships, crafting culture, developing talent, and fostering supportive environments for open dialogue. • Thus, resulting in raised awareness, performance, and responsibility.
    • 8. Transformation • Throughout my recent personal, spiritual, and academic journey I am transforming my leadership patterns to involve collaboration and co-creation. • For instance, my old practices in management consisted of ‘telling and selling’ as a way to influence and motivate teams. My patterns were about caretaking and patriarchy instead of mutuality. • I attribute this old pattern to the era (1970-1980) in which I learned management techniques, as well as my past organizational cultures. (Nature/Nurture) • Throughout this transition, I learned that stewardship asks to serve organizations without caretaking and without taking control; in other words, partnership, not parenting.
    • 9. Currently • After a time of healing and questioning my work’s purpose, I chose to return to my professional life personally transformed. • It is not a position I desire, I now purposefully select my role in society responding to my present context. Currently, I recognize that it is a personal transformation of my perspectives, which is my real purpose. • “What emerges is not a new job-which would be a change-but some new sense of yourself, some new reality you’re dealing with, some new idea, that is moving you forward” (Bridges, 2004, p. 98). • Consequently, I have a better appreciation of using myself as instrument; an instrument for inspiring partnership, moral conduct, and creating new vision.
    • 10. References • Argyris, C. (1990). Overcoming organizational defences. Boston: Allyn and Bacon. • Bateson, G. (2000). Steps to an ecology of mind. Chicago: Chicago University Press. • Block, P. (1996). Stewardship. San Francisco, CA: Berrett-Koehler Publishers, Inc. • Bolman, L., & Deal, T. (2008). Reframing organizations: Artistry, choice, and leadership. 4th • Ed. San Francisco: Joessy-Bass. • Bridges, W. (2004). Transitions: Making sense of life’s changes. 2nd Ed. Cambridge: DeCapo Press.
    • 11. References: • Buckingham, M., & Clifton, D. O. (2001). Now discover your strengths. New York: The Free • Press. • Burke, W. (2008). Organizational change: theory and practice. 2nd Ed. Cambridge: DeCapo • Press. • Butler, T. (2009). CareerLeader. Retrieved www.careerleader.com/cf/univ/ustundergrad.html. • Cashman, K. (1997). Authentic leadership. Innovative Leader, 6(11), 305. • Chatterjee, D. (1998). Leading consciously: a pilgrimage toward self mastery. Boston: • Butterworth-Heinemann. • DCamp, K. (2003). Get down to business. In Effron M., Grandossy, R., • & Goldsmith, M. (Eds.). (2003). Human Resources in the 21st century. New Jersey: • John Wiley & Sons.
    • 12. References • Drucker, P. F. (2004). What makes an effective executive. Harvard Business Review 82(6), • 58-63. • Evans, N. J., Forney, D. S., & Guido-DiBrito, F. (1998). Student development in college: • Theory, research and practice. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass. • Facilitate. (2011). Collins English Dictionary. Retrieved • http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/facilitate • Greenleaf, R. K. (1977). Servant Leadership. New Jersey: Paulist Press. • Griseri, P. (1998). Managing values: Ethical change in organizations. London: Macmillan • Business.
    • 13. References • Hall, D. T. (2002). Careers in and out of organizations. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. • Hall, D. T., Las Heras, M., Shen, Y. (2009). The Protean career orientation and career • counseling. National Career Development Association, Career Developments Journal 25(2), 14-15. • Hawkins, P. (1991). The spiritual dimension of the learning organization. Management • Education and Development, 22 (3), 172-187. • Hughes, R. L., & Beatty, K. C. (2005). Becoming a strategic leader. San Francisco, CA: • Josey-Bass. • Ireland, R. D., & Hitt, M. (2005). Achieving and maintaining strategic competitiveness in the • 21st century: The role of strategic leadership. Academy of Management Executive, 19(4). • Koliba, C. (1985). What is Facilitation? Reflection. Retrieved • http://www.uvm.edu/~dewey/reflection_manual/facilitating.html.
    • 14. References • Lennick, D., & Kiel, F. (2008). Moral intelligence. New Jersey: Wharton School Publishing. • Morris, T. (1997). If Aristotle ran General Motors. New York: Henry Holt Company • Myers, I. B. McCaulley, M. H., Quenk, N. L., & Hammer, A. L. (1998). MBTI Manual, third • Edition. Palo Alto: Consulting Psychologists Press, Inc. • Northouse, P. G., (2007). Leadership: theory and practice. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. • Quinn, R. E. (2005). Moments of greatness: Entering the fundamental state of leadership. • Harvard Business Review 83, 42-47. • Ruona, W. E. A., & Gibson, S. K. (2004). The making of 21st century HR: An analysis of the • convergence of HRM, HRD, and OD. Human Resource Management Journal, 43(1), 49- • 66.
    • 15. References • Senge, P. (1990). The fifth discipline: The art and practice of the learning organization. New • York: Doubleday. • Senge, P., Kleiner, A., Roberts, C., Ross, R., Roth, G., & Smith, B. (1999). The dance of change. The challenges to sustaining momentum in learning organizations. New York: Doubleday. • Sipe, J. W., & Frick, D. M. (2009). Seven pillars of servant leadership. New Jersey: Paulist Press. • Society of Human Resource Management India (SHRM). (2010). What does it mean to be a • values-based organization. Retrieved http://www.shrmindia.org/what-does-it-mean-be- values-based-organization.
    • 16. References • Sudhir, V., & Murthy, P. N. (2001). Ethical challenge to businesses: The deeper meaning. • Journal of Business Ethics. 30, 197-209. • • Quinn, R. E., Dutton, J. E., & Spreitzer, G. M. (2003). Reflective best self. Center for Positive • • Organizational Scholarship. Retrieved • • http://www.bus.umich.edu/Positive/POSTeachingandLearning/ReflectedBestSelfExercise •

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