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Design Clinic Workshop - Coworking Europe Conference 2011
 

Design Clinic Workshop - Coworking Europe Conference 2011

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    Design Clinic Workshop - Coworking Europe Conference 2011 Design Clinic Workshop - Coworking Europe Conference 2011 Document Transcript

    • WWW.STUDIOTILT.COM
    • This document represents the output of a design ‘brainstorm’ facilitated by Q1. How can the design of a space encourage collaboration and innovation?TILT on day three (5th of November) of the 2011 Co-Working EuropeConference in ClubOffice, Berlin. Q2. How is the community mapped and visually represented in the space?TILT is a design practice that specialises in delivering collaborative working Q3. How can the design of a space promote autonomous behaviour from itsspaces. Through a process of ‘co-design’, TILT works closely with the users of members?the space, harnessing their knowledge and ideas and combining them withdesign expertise to deliver inspiring and enabling spaces. The key themes have been extracted from the ideas presented by the participants and where appropriate ideas have been grouped together andThis brainstorm does not form part of TILT’s co-design methodology. Instead, thematically linked.it was a simple exercise in pulling together ideas focused around threequestions that have consistently emerged during TILT’s extensive design work The emergent key themes are listed and explained at the end of thiswith co-working spaces internationally: document.
    • 1. MAXIMISE CAPACITY FOR ADAPTATION 2. UTILISE ALL PLAINS OF THE SPACE FLEXIBLE KITCHEN ADAPTABLE WHITE BOARD/CHALK BOARD 1. TOTALLY CLEAR SPACE 1. IDEA CHANGEABLE 2. BESIDE A ROOM WITH STUFF 2. WHICH STUFF YOU NEED TABLE/TECHNIC LEGO INFORMAL GATHERING3. TAKE STUFF BACK TO CLEAR SPACE 3. DEVELOP IDEAS SOUND ABSORBTION PRIVACY/OPENESS DEDICATED WORK WOOD/GLASS 4. PLAYING WITH LEVELS AND HEIGHT 3. PROMOTE THE FLUX OUTSIDE AREAS CAFEFOR CENTRAL PLACE GAMES GARDEN TRAMPOLINE 5. SHOW INDIVIDUALITY “CRAZY PLACE” MOBILE 7. LOOSE DEFINITION OF SPACE 6. PLAYING WITH LIGHT 8. VISIBILITY OF IDEAS MODIFY PURPOSEFUL AMBIENT/LOCAL/GLOBAL ACTIVITY LED 10. ZONES WITHOUT DIVIDERS 9. SPACE UNREADY HIGH ENERGY/BUZZ “LIKE IN THE BRAIN” TWITTER IDEA WALLS ETC AREASBRAINSTORMING AREA/EXECUTION AREA “LEADS TO COLLABORATION” KEY: ABC : KEY THEMES : THEMATIC CONNECTION : RELATED CONCEPT : REPETITION
    • 1. MAP THE SPACE DEFINED BY ACTIVITY FUNCTIONAL FURNITURE TO CREATE A NICHE TO LEAD 2. (COMMUNITY IDENTFICATION) MAPS THE COMMUNITY COLOURS ON FLOOR POSTERS WHO IS THERE TO IDENTITY USE LOCAL GRAPHIC DESIGNERS MEMBER PROFILE MOVED WHEN NEEDED UTILITY BOARDS TECHNOLOGY ACTIVITY “MEMBER OF THE MONTH” 9. WHERE THE MEMBERS ARE IS WHERE THE SPACE IS “GREATEST ACHIEVMENT” POSITION THEMSELVES IN THE SPACE STICKERS/LOGO 5. RELATIONSHIPS 3. 2D MAPS BECOME TOO COMPLEX INTERNAL/EXTERNAL LOCAL/GLOBAL 10. REFLEXIVE TWITTER “PILES OF CUBES” RED AND GREEN FOCUS TABLE4. WHAT AND WHY TO MAP? WHERE? DISTRACTABLE/SOCIAL TABLE PHYSICAL MEMBER WALL (KITCHEN?) STOP/GO ARGENTINIAN RESTAURANT - NAME - COMPANY - ACTIVITY ACTUAL MAP - CONTACT LOW CEILING / HIGH CEILING - LIVE 2D/3D - BORN PHYSICAL/VIRTUAL SHOP 8. FUNCTION PINS + WIRES ON/OFF QUIET WORK LOUD WORK 6. COMMUNICATE TO STREET PRODUCTS OF MEMBERS 7. FUNCTION THROUGH SPACE “ITS OWN REPRESENTATION” WEBSITE : PROFILES KEY: ABC : KEY THEMES : THEMATIC CONNECTION : RELATED CONCEPT : REPETITION
    • 1. NOT TEXTUAL BUT STRUCTURAL CERTAIN DESIGN DECISIONS ENFORCE CERTAIN BEHAVIOURS2. APPROPRIATION OF THE SPACE BY MEMBERS RESTRICTED NO. OF POWER OUTLETS MAY LEAD TO READING 3. SELF EXPLANATORY HIGH SCREENS FOR PRIVACY - ICONS - COLOURS “PODS” FOR ACTIVITY - SOUND SYSTEMS “THINK ABOUT ENERGY” - COLOUR SYSTEMS YELLOW FOR LOUD “SELF CLEANING KITCHEN” RECYCLING AS DEFAULT WORKING WITH LESS ABLED MEMBERS 4. MAPPING INTERACTION NO REGULAR TRASH BIN ZEN AREA WITH NO WIRELESS (WI-FI) GREEN FOR WORK ETC “WALKING KITCHEN” TECH INTERACTION ACTIVITY BOARD 5. GAMIFICATION GIVE/GET APPS 4 SQUARE ACCESS OTHER MEMBERS 6. AUTONOMOUS IS TO BIG A WORD “MAYOR OF SPACE” ROLE MODELS DECISION MAKING WHAT IS A COMMUNITY? FURNITURE 7. A COMMUNITY THAT RUNS ITSELF TRUST - SIZE - SHAPE COMMUNICATES BEHAVIOUR HOW MUCH FAIR RATES COFFEE AND RUBBISH - MATERIAL CLEAR AND FUNNY IS IT INDIVIDUAL OR COLLECTIVE? PLAY E.G. AUSTIN FINACIAL 8. CUSTOMISATION OF DESK AND SPACE SERVICES INFORMATION 9. PLATFORM TO DEVELOPBALLONS FOR THE FUTURE EVENTSWHERE TO SMOKE 10. SINGLE CONTACT FOR MONEY AND PAYMENT WELCOME TOUR SUPPORT OF COMMUNITY KEY: ABC : KEY THEMES : THEMATIC CONNECTION : RELATED CONCEPT : REPETITION
    • 1. MAXIMISE CAPACITY FOR ADAPTATION - The 1. MAP THE SPACE DEFINED BY ACTIVITY - Help 1. NOT TEXTUAL BUT STRUCTURAL -space can be a relatively blank canvas, shaped by signal people’s ‘states’ by having visual maps Encouraging people to take control of theirthe users. Have a room full of tools which can be representing what activities are generally environment is not necessarily about signage, itused and applied in the space as required. happening in the different zones within the overall is about design decisions in the space. Certain2. UTILISE ALL PLAINS OF THE SPACE - Every space. This could be done through colours on design decisions enforce certain types ofsurface can have a function. A wall can be a the floor. behaviour e.g. a restricted number of power unitsprojection screen or a writable chalk board. 2. COMMUNITY IDENTIFICATION HELPS MAPS may reduce laptop usage and encourage reading3. PROMOTE THE FLUX - Embrace disparate/ THE COMMUNITY - There is a necessity for people in that space.multi-functional uses of space that change over to know who each other are and have sight of 2. APPROPRIATION OF THE SPACE BY MEMBERSthe course of the day. Encourage movement each others projects. This is an exercise that could - Have a part of the space as a blank canvasthrough the spaces. be done with members. Local graphic designers which can be appropriated by members for the4. PLAYING WITH LEVELS AND HEIGHT - Use can be used to develop member profiles. purposes they need, letting them define its use.ceiling height and floor levels to denote different 3. 2D MAPS BECOME TO COMPLEX - There 3. SELF EXPLANATORY - The space itself shouldzones of space, encouraging different behaviours. shouldn’t be an over-reliance on 2d mapping as be easy to navigate and the purposes of the5. SHOW INDIVIDUALITY - Be unique, it’s good to the changing landscape of members makes the different zones relatively clear. Use of sound, lightnot be the same as other co-working spaces. task of updating any member map difficult. There and colour systems can help users manage their6. PLAYING WITH LIGHT - Flexible lighting allows is need to blend this requirement with own behaviours e.g. yellow for ‘loud’ area, greendifferent tones/moods to be set for different zones new technology. for ‘work’ area etc.within the space. 4. WHAT AND WHY TO MAP?- A physical member 4. MAPPING INTERACTION - Having an visual7. LOOSE DEFINITION OF SPACE - The function of wall can have basic information on members e.g. representation of the members in the space wherethe space does not need to be completely Name, Company, Activity, Contact details. This members can indicate what they would like todefinitive e.g. it’s not just a meeting space or could be supported with a geographical map with ‘give’ to the network in terms of skills, and whata cafe. pins in it which indicate where each member lives. they would like to ‘get’ in exchange. Encouraging8. VISIBILITY OF IDEAS - Let member’s have sight 5. RELATIONSHIPS - It’s important to members to host their own connections.of each other’s ideas and activities within the understand the level of relationship the space 5. GAMIFICATION - Members should be usingspaces e.g. Twitter walls wants to create within the member community. technology to have sight of each within the space,9. SPACE UNREADY - The space should never be Also, it’s important not be insular and understand again taking responsibility for making their own‘finished’. It can be in perpetual BETA, where the how to establish relationships between the connections. This can be combined with funusers can feel enabled to continue to evolve it. members and those outside the space. elements e.g. becoming ‘the mayor’ of the space10. ZONES WITHOUT DIVIDERS - Spaces do not 6. COMMUNICATE TO THE STREET - Public facing akin to 4square.have to be physically divided throughout the space windows and walls represent an opportunity to 6. AUTONOMOUS IS TOO BIG A WORD - It’sto allow for different zones/uses. Where possible, profile members and their activities. A window important to understand the extent to which youopenness and transparency of activity should be onto a public street could have a ‘shop’ display, wish to define the community in the space and formaintained. making the products of members available it to host itself vs being hosted directly. for sale. 7. A COMMUNITY THAT RUNS ITSELF - To what 7. FUNCTION THROUGH SPACE IS “ITS OWN extent should a community be self-servicing? self REPRESENTATION” - The space itself can service coffee? disposing of their own rubbish? demonstrate its function through its design. 8. CUSTOMISATION OF DESK AND SPACE - Low ceilings denote quieter working spaces e.g. Members can change the space themselves add/ library/study, while high ceilings can indicate take away elements. This makes them feel more louder working spaces cafe style/studio. Members in control of their environment. can instinctively know to how to relate to each 9. PLATFORM TO DEVELOP - Space can be viewed other, taking their cues from the space itself. as a platform like IT not just a physical vessel for 8. FUNCTION ON/OFF - Members can actively objects but a constantly evolving framework. signal to each other their state of readiness to 10. SINGLE CONTACT FOR MONEY AND connect and collaborate. Like with Skype (or an PAYMENT - Deliver the basic non shared aspects Argentinian restaurant!), members can show red of the collaborative working service model simply using a red cube to indicate when they don’t want and efficiently e.g. payments, so that the mem- to be disturbed and a green cube to indicate they bers can focus on developing those aspects that are happy to engage. can be shared e.g. events programme. 9. WHERE MEMBERS ARE IS WHERE THE SPACE IS - Design of the space is community led. Their activity within the space helps define its function. 10. REFLEXIVE - The space needs to reflect a sense of the dynamism of those who are using it e.g.Twitter wall THEMES AND INSIGHTS
    • WWW.STUDIOTILT.COM