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Transformation Of American Society From 1815
Transformation Of American Society From 1815
Transformation Of American Society From 1815
Transformation Of American Society From 1815
Transformation Of American Society From 1815
Transformation Of American Society From 1815
Transformation Of American Society From 1815
Transformation Of American Society From 1815
Transformation Of American Society From 1815
Transformation Of American Society From 1815
Transformation Of American Society From 1815
Transformation Of American Society From 1815
Transformation Of American Society From 1815
Transformation Of American Society From 1815
Transformation Of American Society From 1815
Transformation Of American Society From 1815
Transformation Of American Society From 1815
Transformation Of American Society From 1815
Transformation Of American Society From 1815
Transformation Of American Society From 1815
Transformation Of American Society From 1815
Transformation Of American Society From 1815
Transformation Of American Society From 1815
Transformation Of American Society From 1815
Transformation Of American Society From 1815
Transformation Of American Society From 1815
Transformation Of American Society From 1815
Transformation Of American Society From 1815
Transformation Of American Society From 1815
Transformation Of American Society From 1815
Transformation Of American Society From 1815
Transformation Of American Society From 1815
Transformation Of American Society From 1815
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Transformation Of American Society From 1815

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  1. <ul><li>The Transformation of American Society, </li></ul><ul><li>1815 – 1840 </li></ul>
  2. Major Socio-Economic Forces <ul><li>industrialization in New England </li></ul><ul><li>spread of cotton cultivation in South </li></ul><ul><li>Westward expansion </li></ul>
  3. Map 9.1: The Removal of Native Americans to the West, 1820–1840
  4. The Trail of Tears
  5. Map 9.2: Major Rivers, Roads, and Canals, 1825–1860
  6. Map 9.3: Population Distribution, 1790 and 1850
  7. Map 9.4: American Cities, 1820 and 1860
  8. Map 9.4: American Cities, 1820 and 1860 (cont’d)
  9. Map 9.5: U.S. Manufacturing Employment, 1820–1850
  10. Map 11.1: Railroad Growth, 1850–1860
  11. Alexis de Tocqueville, Democracy in America (1835)
  12. John Jacob Astor (1763 – 1848): millionaire businessman in fur trading, real estate, and opium; American Blue Blood
  13. Robert Owen (1771-1858) Utopian Socialist
  14. Cornelius Vanderbilt (1779 – 1877): American railroad and shipping magnate Cartoon depicting Cornelius Vanderbilt and James “Diamond Jim” Fiske in the Erie Railroad rivalry.
  15. James Fenimore Cooper (1789-1851)
  16. Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882)
  17. Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804-1864)
  18. William Lloyd Garrison (1805-1879): abolitionist, editor/journalist (The Liberator) , social reformer
  19. William Gilmore Simms (1806 – 1870): Southern historian, novelist, and poet
  20. Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807-1882)
  21. Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849)
  22. Harriet Beecher Stowe (1811-1896)
  23. William Wells Brown (c. 1814 - 1884): wrote what is believed to have been the first novel by an American Black; Clotel, or The President’s Daughter [London(1853)]. Brown was a fugitive slave and abolitionist.
  24. Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862)
  25. Frederick Douglass (1818-1895)
  26. Walt Whitman (1819-1892)
  27. Herman Melville (1819- 1891)
  28. Thomas Cole and the Hudson School of Romantic Painters Thomas Cole, View From Mount Holyoke, Northampton, Massachusetts (1836)
  29. First Wave Feminism: Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, Victoria Woodhull
  30. Seneca Falls Convention and the Declaration of Sentiments (July, 1848) Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Lucretia Mott
  31. Dorothea Dix (1802-1887): social reformer, advocated for lunatic asylums and prison reform; died in Trenton, NJ on July 17, 1887 Greystone Park: established by NJ Legislature in 1876 in response to the advocacy of Dorothea Dix. Originally called New Jersey State Lunatic Asylum at Morristown. Dix founded the Trenton Lunatic Asylum (Trenton Psychiatric Hospital) in 1848.
  32. Emily Dickinson (1830-1886)
  33.  

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