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RFPs, Proposals, and Contracts for Web Developers

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  • You must face the fact that most clients will delay, some because they’re busy running their own business, others intentionally. Yet, when you signed the contract, you and your client came to an agreement that involves mutual commitments, and your contract ought to stipulate if and when a delay constitutes a "breach." There are several ways you might do this: Stipulate that content is due by a certain date and, if not received, the client is in breach of contract. (You’ll have to specify the ramifications of that breach, such as the client loses his deposit or a portion thereof, and the contract is voided.) Stipulate that if content isn’t received by a certain date, the remaining balance of the project is due and payable. (This avoids calling delay a breach and canceling the contract outright, yet still spells out consequences and provides a motivation for the client to supply content in a timely manner.) Instead of attaching payments to production milestones, stipulate that final payment is due within a certain number of days, regardless of whether the project is completed or not. You can specify the time frame roughly to correspond with the date you estimate that the project will be completed, were no delays to occur. (This also avoids a breach and cancellation of the contract, but also avoids the impression that you’re punishing the client for being late — and you still get your money on time! The client’s primary motivation to provide content in a timely manner is that he’ll have paid for a site that remains largely unfinished, due to his own inaction.)
  • You must face the fact that most clients will delay, some because they’re busy running their own business, others intentionally. Yet, when you signed the contract, you and your client came to an agreement that involves mutual commitments, and your contract ought to stipulate if and when a delay constitutes a "breach." There are several ways you might do this: Stipulate that content is due by a certain date and, if not received, the client is in breach of contract. (You’ll have to specify the ramifications of that breach, such as the client loses his deposit or a portion thereof, and the contract is voided.) Stipulate that if content isn’t received by a certain date, the remaining balance of the project is due and payable. (This avoids calling delay a breach and canceling the contract outright, yet still spells out consequences and provides a motivation for the client to supply content in a timely manner.) Instead of attaching payments to production milestones, stipulate that final payment is due within a certain number of days, regardless of whether the project is completed or not. You can specify the time frame roughly to correspond with the date you estimate that the project will be completed, were no delays to occur. (This also avoids a breach and cancellation of the contract, but also avoids the impression that you’re punishing the client for being late — and you still get your money on time! The client’s primary motivation to provide content in a timely manner is that he’ll have paid for a site that remains largely unfinished, due to his own inaction.)
  • RFPs, Proposals, and Contracts for Web Developers

    1. 1. View the Online Course Here http://bit.ly/WrEUHt

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