IncorporatingSocial Media into Medical Education<br />Katherine Chretien, GWU, Medicine Clerkship Director<br />Vineet Aro...
PRESENTERS<br />
Agenda & Workstations<br />What is social media?<br />How can social media be used in medical education?<br />Breakout gro...
What is social media?<br />Social media is digital content that can be easily shared with other people via the internet us...
web applications that can be used to create social networks </li></ul>The frenzy continues to grow, due in part to a narro...
more users in the 2-12 age group and 55+ age group </li></ul>Pew Internet reports<br />
Does Social Media Fit in Medical Education?<br /><ul><li>Yes. Social media may have a place in medical education. And biom...
‘Social’ = people. Our med students are people. Our lab techs are people. Our patients are people. Our campus community is...
‘Media’ = information. We create and use media. Photos, video, audio, documents, websites. Tutorials, maps, reviews. Web l...
Blogs<br />
Disclaimer/Privacy statements<br />All opinions expressed…are those of respective authors and not of their employers<br />...
Twitter Terminology<br /><ul><li>Tweet – message that is 140 characters or less
Retweets or “RT” – repeating the message
@ Reply – a message to specific tweeter that is public
Direct message or “DM” – a message to a specific tweeter that is private</li></li></ul><li>Twitter<br />Fastest growing so...
Real time conversation<br />
40% of tweets are “pointless babble”<br />
Breaking through the Babble<br />Select followers carefully<br />Create or follow Twitter list<br />Save a hashtag search ...
GOOD TWEET<br />BAD TWEET<br />Caution:  Whatever happens on Twitter stays on Twitter <br />
Wikis<br />
What is a wiki?<br />Awiki is a web site that includes web pages containing content. Wiki pages are created using a collab...
Basic wiki features<br />Functions<br />Types of content<br />Create new page<br />Edit content on a page<br />Delete a pa...
Managing Wiki<br />Content<br />NOTE: Revision History is a standard wiki function. All wiki software includes the option ...
Site level history<br />Page level history<br />
PBWorks’ Settings<br />Managing Wiki<br />Access<br />Manage Site on Google Sites<br />Who must have access? What level of...
Academic applications for a Wiki<br />Course website<br />Description and ‘need to know’ info<br />Resources for learning<...
Use a wiki for collaborative writing<br />Instead of circulating documents to a group of people via email, create wiki pag...
Podcasting<br />
The Infinite Dial. Arbitron/Edison Media Research. Jan 2009.<br />
iPOD + broadCAST<br />Series of downloadable audio or video episodes hosted on the internet<br />Subscriptions using RSS f...
downloadable
program-driven, mainly with a host and/or theme
convenient, usually via an automated feed with computer software</li></li></ul><li>Examples of podcasting in medicine and ...
Examples of podcasting in medicine and science<br />
Examples of podcasting in medicine and science<br />
Examples of podcasting in education<br />
Examples of podcasting in education<br />
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Social Media in Medical Education | AAIM2010

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Slides from Social Media workshop for medical educators at Academic Internal Medicine Week 2010. Presenters represent 3 different universities and different roles in medical education. Please contact us for further information and re-use or for guest speaking engagements. We do birthday parties.

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  • No longer does the majority of Americans rely on a single computer either at home or at work or school, but rather many people have several computers as well as web-enabled portable devices such cell phones, smart phones, laptops and netbooks, ereaders and new tablet computers.Data: Pew Internet ReportsHome Broadband, Aaron Smith Aug 11, 2010 2010 http://www.pewinternet.org/Reports/2010/Home-Broadband-2010.aspxWho’s Online, Internet Demographics May 2010 Survey (PewInternet) http://www.pewinternet.org/Static-Pages/Trend-Data/Whos-Online.aspx Credit: Image source, FairfieldVoice.com
  • Credits: Image, origin unknown; published on multiple websites; accessed 2009 September webpages.scu.edu
  • Breakout groups:Choose two social media applications to exploreSelect one of the two to begin the sessionJoin the work station, then rotate to your second selection
  • -Example of typical blog which has a header with title, short description, +/- graphic-Posts, usually dated follow below in reverse chronological order-Sidebar can be customized. Shown here is a poll/quiz.-Renal Fellow Network: daily teaching points for renal fellows. Group authorship.
  • Comment section follows each blog postingReaders can post comments, generate dialogue around posted contentCan set to allow anonymous comments or only allow those who have signed in with an account
  • -Wishful thinking in medical education (Anne Marie Cunningham)-Blog belonging to medical educator in UK with interest in using technology in med ed-Posts invite dialogue among medical educators. Active commenting section.-Linked to Twitter account, easy to tweet posts to share to others on Twitter
  • -Academic Life in Emergency Medicine (Michelle Lin)-”Collaborating, meeting, and learning from inspiring people in the academic world of EM”-Posts center around medical education, review of recent relevant journal articles in med ed, clinical tricks of the trade, faculty spotlights.
  • -Mothers in Medicine (Katherine Chretien)-Group blog of physician-mothers, now also with medical student and pre-med mother representation-Forum for support, guidance for students, trainees, faculty-Regularly features questions submitted by readers on topics related to having children during training, career guidance, work-life balance
  • -Medical Education Blog (unknown author, Canadian web address)“ I no longer accept comments on this site because I am being swamped with spammers.”-Includes posts on student resources, teaching resources, technology
  • -University of Michigan Medical School Dose of Reality: Med Students’ Blog-”Eye-opening….definitely”-”This is where you’ll hear what it’s really like at the University of Michigan Medical School.”-Student bloggers representing all years of med school-Use for marketing, admissions
  • -Reflective Writing Class blog-Private, password-protected-Used in medicine clerkship as a vehicle for reflective writing-Students given option of choosing anonymous names-Faculty mentor provides feedback (comments) with each post to try to stimulate deeper reflectivity-Study of GW and U Mass medicine clerkship students: no difference in level of reflection or subject themes when students blogged vs submitting traditional essay assignment
  • -Examples of Disclaimers, Privacy statements on blogs-Health care Blogger code of ethics purported goals per their website: “To give the readers of a medical blogger a clear idea of the standards by which the blog is maintained. To give bloggers (especially anonymous ones) a clear set of guidelines they can show employers, patients, or other concerned parties as to the nature of the blogging.Since healthcare blogging is sometimes dealing with extremely sensitive information, it is extremely important that these blogs maintain the highest of integrity.”-Blogs apply and are reviewed. Approved blogs may use “button” on site.
  • - Examples of what these statements might include.
  • The original wiki software was created by Ward Cunningham (1994). The most popular wiki in the world is Wikipedia, launched in 2001 as ‘Nupedia’. The founders decided it would be beneficial to refer to the wiki software with which it was build, to highlight the collaborative nature of the project, and renamed it Wikipedia (wiki + encyclopedia).Visit Wikipedia’s FAQ page for interesting facts about the world’s greatest wiki.http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:FAQ_Index
  • A wiki site allows anyone to edit, delete, or modify the content on the web. A wiki administrator can make a wiki public for anyone to view, or private for select members to view.Member access can be limited, generally speaking, to read-only or read/write. Depending on the wiki software used, additional levels of rights may be assigned to members.Admins always have the ability to review changes made by members, and compare versions, and revert to earlier versions.
  • This wiki, for a clerkship program, is built using PBWorks (pbworks.com) wiki software, and hosted on PBWorks’ server.The layout and design shown is standard for wikis built using PBWorks: the content is on the left and the navigation and admin tools are on the top and on the right.Notice that the page includes text, images, lists, and links.Notice basic tools available around the page: Create page (icon and text, at the top right) Edit page (tab, on the top left) Recent activity (widget box, right) Control access (control box, top right) Control settings (top, tab)
  • This wiki, for a clerkship program, is built using Google Sites wiki software (sites.google.com), and hosted on Google’s server.The layout and design shown is standard for wikis built using Google Sites: the content is on the right and the navigation and admin tools are on the top and on the left.Notice that the page includes text, images, lists, and links.Notice basic tools available around the page: Create page (button, at the top right) Edit page (button, on the top right) Recent activity (link, left) Control access (unseen; viathe ‘More actions’ button, top right) Control settings (unseen; via the ‘More actions’ button, top right)
  • On this page, in PBWorks, a video can be embedded and played within the wiki page.Also notice the option to add a COMMENT to the page, at the bottom.
  • On this page, in Google Sites, a video can be embedded and played within the wiki page.Also notice the option to add a COMMENT to the page, at the bottom.
  • View ‘Change History’ easily to see what members have edited, added, created.These screen shots are from a PBWorks wiki.
  • Review web site ‘history’ on the website level or on the page level. Notice the ‘Revert to this version’ option on the page level.These screen shots are from a Google Sites wiki.
  • Managing access to your site involves important decision making.Who MUST HAVE ACCESS? What level of access?Who needs to be able to write new content and edit existing content?Do some people need read-only access?Is the site public, or does the site require a login to view any page or content?
  • A wiki may not be the solution for every need. However it may be a solution for specific problems such as access for program or project team members outside of the institution. For example, a course, such as a clerkship, where students and administrative staff are scattered at sites and clinics in a wide area. Or a research project that includes collaborators from other institutions or perhaps other countries.
  • Wikis can be created, used and closed reflecting the lifespan of any project.Accessibility can be restricted to specific people. And those people can be granted certain privelges, or not.Most importantly, track changes in a more dignified manner than traditional document editing software.Photo: Microsoft Office Clip Art
  • http://www.medpedia.com/about “In association with Harvard Medical School, Stanford School of Medicine, Berkeley School of Public Health, University of Michigan Medical School and other leading global health organizations, Medpedia will be a commons for the gathering of the information and people critical to health care. Many organizations have united to support The Medpedia Project…”
  • http://radiopaedia.org/‘…develop the most comprehensive online resource where information is up to date and relevant to the needs of the radiology community, and to provide that information for free….’
  • http://sicw.wikispaces.umb.edu/ ‘…initiative at UMass Boston facilitates learning and teaching innovation, research and public engagement, discussion and collaboration among faculty and students concerning interactions between scientific developments and social change. Science in a Changing World (SICW) connects a number of programs of study at the undergraduate and graduate level and other educational and outreach projects…’
  • Podcasting has become extremely widespread over the past several years. It has made incredible gains in use in virtually every age group.“By 2010 podcast audience growth is expected to reach a conservative 45 million users who will have ever listened to a podcast. Aggressive estimates place this number closer to 75 million by this date.” —Bridge Ratings The Podcasting Outlook. Bridge Ratings. 12 Nov 2005.
  • Here is a screenshot of the popular iTunes application (Mac, Windows, Linux; free) and its podcast directory built into the iTunes Store. There are podcasts on virtually any topic imaginable. This is the front page for podcasts in the medical genre. The vast majority of podcasts are free to listeners. Using iTunes, you can download podcast episodes and subscribe to entire podcasts, which allows for automatic notification when new episodes are made available.
  • Many clinical practice and basic science research journals produce podcasts as complements to their printed counterparts. Using podcasts, they can elaborate on information found in articles, interview authors, and talk about late-breaking news. Some, like the one from Johns Hopkins, are entirely devoted to discussing interesting medical news recently in the literature across all journals.
  • Many are produced independently and focus on some theme, usually medical education of medical students, residents, and practicing physicians. On the bottom row are shows dedicated to pre-medical and current medical students, and these are frequently produced by individual institutions or associations, such as the AAMC.
  • One interesting use of podcasting was by the University of Alabama’s Undergraduate Admissions Office, who produced video podcasts of current students giving virtual guided tours of the campus—one stop or landmark per episode. Visitors to the campus can download these episodes before their visit, pull out their iPods upon arriving, and give themselves a tour of the campus at their own pace.
  • Other groups have started to use podcasting for bona fide teaching across the undergraduate, graduate, and continuing medical education communities.
  • Screenshot of the Apple Garageband audio editing application (Mac only; free). A popular alternative for Windows is Audacity, also free. There is a visual timeline editor at the top, chapter markers and artwork areas at the bottom, and an area to annotate the episode’s contents to the right.
  • Screenshot of the back end of the popular Wordpress blogging platform, which many podcasters use to publish their audio files and episode information.
  • The final product as the listener sees it.
  • Podpress is a free plugin for Wordpress that can conveniently format and annotate audio files for iTunes syndication.
  • Podpress is a free plugin for Wordpress that can conveniently format and annotate audio files for iTunes syndication.
  • Podpress is a free plugin for Wordpress that can conveniently format and annotate audio files for iTunes syndication. This screen shows one of its useful features: a preview of how a podcast will appear in the iTunes directory.
  • Template designby Carrie Saarinen 2010
  • Social Media in Medical Education | AAIM2010

    1. 1. IncorporatingSocial Media into Medical Education<br />Katherine Chretien, GWU, Medicine Clerkship Director<br />Vineet Arora, Chicago, Associate Program Director, Internal Medicine Residency<br />Carrie Saarinen, UMass, Instructional Technologist, Department of Medicine<br />Ben Ferguson, Chicago, Medical Student<br />
    2. 2. PRESENTERS<br />
    3. 3. Agenda & Workstations<br />What is social media?<br />How can social media be used in medical education?<br />Breakout groups @workstations<br />Q&A<br />Wrap up & Closing<br />
    4. 4. What is social media?<br />Social media is digital content that can be easily shared with other people via the internet using free web-based tools. Generally, viewers of this content are welcome to use and redistribute this content freely. <br />The social media frenzy began with the emergence of the ‘read-write web’<br /><ul><li>no special ‘coding’ or ‘language’ skills needed to publish content online
    5. 5. web applications that can be used to create social networks </li></ul>The frenzy continues to grow, due in part to a narrowing of the digital divide<br /><ul><li>more people have access to computers and the internet
    6. 6. more users in the 2-12 age group and 55+ age group </li></ul>Pew Internet reports<br />
    7. 7. Does Social Media Fit in Medical Education?<br /><ul><li>Yes. Social media may have a place in medical education. And biomedical research. And clinical systems and patient care.
    8. 8. ‘Social’ = people. Our med students are people. Our lab techs are people. Our patients are people. Our campus community is made up of people. Our off-campus community is made up of people.
    9. 9. ‘Media’ = information. We create and use media. Photos, video, audio, documents, websites. Tutorials, maps, reviews. Web links, news feeds, activity calendars. </li></li></ul><li>Hands-on Workshop<br />
    10. 10. Blogs<br />
    11. 11.
    12. 12.
    13. 13.
    14. 14.
    15. 15.
    16. 16.
    17. 17.
    18. 18.
    19. 19.
    20. 20. Disclaimer/Privacy statements<br />All opinions expressed…are those of respective authors and not of their employers<br />Not substitute for medical advice<br />No profit from any material on this website<br />References to patients have been changed to protect patient privacy<br />Disrespectful comments deleted<br />
    21. 21. Twitter Terminology<br /><ul><li>Tweet – message that is 140 characters or less
    22. 22. Retweets or “RT” – repeating the message
    23. 23. @ Reply – a message to specific tweeter that is public
    24. 24. Direct message or “DM” – a message to a specific tweeter that is private</li></li></ul><li>Twitter<br />Fastest growing social media site<br />Microblog messages that are 140 characters or less to ‘followers’<br />
    25. 25.
    26. 26.
    27. 27. Real time conversation<br />
    28. 28.
    29. 29.
    30. 30. 40% of tweets are “pointless babble”<br />
    31. 31. Breaking through the Babble<br />Select followers carefully<br />Create or follow Twitter list<br />Save a hashtag search “#meded” <br />Use Twitter program to aggregate tweets<br />
    32. 32.
    33. 33.
    34. 34. GOOD TWEET<br />BAD TWEET<br />Caution: Whatever happens on Twitter stays on Twitter <br />
    35. 35. Wikis<br />
    36. 36. What is a wiki?<br />Awiki is a web site that includes web pages containing content. Wiki pages are created using a collaborative software program then published to the web. In other words, a wiki is a web-publishing tool.<br />Wiki software is designed for collaborative web site creation. A wiki is a website that includes the collaboration of work from many different authors. <br />Software developer Ward Cunningham used the name ‘wiki’, a Hawaiian term for ‘quick’ or ‘fast’.<br />This file is licensed under the Creative CommonsAttribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic license.<br />
    37. 37. Basic wiki features<br />Functions<br />Types of content<br />Create new page<br />Edit content on a page<br />Delete a page<br />View recent activity<br />View revision history<br />Comment on a page<br />Manage access to content<br />Limit access to editing tools<br />Text<br />Images – photos or graphics<br />Video<br />Charts, tables, graphs<br />Lists<br />Links to other websites<br />Attachments<br />
    38. 38.
    39. 39.
    40. 40.
    41. 41.
    42. 42. Managing Wiki<br />Content<br />NOTE: Revision History is a standard wiki function. All wiki software includes the option to review changes, edits and new page creation. Administrators have the ability to revert, edit or delete any content.<br />
    43. 43. Site level history<br />Page level history<br />
    44. 44. PBWorks’ Settings<br />Managing Wiki<br />Access<br />Manage Site on Google Sites<br />Who must have access? What level of access?<br />Is the site public, or does the site require a login to view any page or content?<br />
    45. 45. Academic applications for a Wiki<br />Course website<br />Description and ‘need to know’ info<br />Resources for learning<br />Assignment delivery<br />Due dates, timelines, task lists<br />Interactive surveys, forms, calendars<br />File storage<br />Project website<br />Description and ‘need to know’ info<br />Resources for research<br />Project team profiles, roles, and responsibilities<br />Due dates, timelines, task lists<br />Collaborative writing<br />File storage<br />
    46. 46.
    47. 47. Use a wiki for collaborative writing<br />Instead of circulating documents to a group of people via email, create wiki pages that can be edited and published easily allowing everyone on your team to see the most up to date information!<br />Stop searching for that email with an important attachment, unsure if it is even relevant anymore. Find the latest info on your team wiki! KNOW when it was last updated and by whom.<br />
    48. 48.
    49. 49.
    50. 50.
    51. 51. Podcasting<br />
    52. 52. The Infinite Dial. Arbitron/Edison Media Research. Jan 2009.<br />
    53. 53. iPOD + broadCAST<br />Series of downloadable audio or video episodes hosted on the internet<br />Subscriptions using RSS feed (e.g. using iTunes)<br />Time- and place-shifted media consumption<br />Simple, quick, and very inexpensive to produce<br />A podcast is a digital audio or video file that is:<br /><ul><li>episodic
    54. 54. downloadable
    55. 55. program-driven, mainly with a host and/or theme
    56. 56. convenient, usually via an automated feed with computer software</li></li></ul><li>Examples of podcasting in medicine and science<br />
    57. 57. Examples of podcasting in medicine and science<br />
    58. 58. Examples of podcasting in medicine and science<br />
    59. 59. Examples of podcasting in education<br />
    60. 60. Examples of podcasting in education<br />
    61. 61.
    62. 62.
    63. 63.
    64. 64.
    65. 65.
    66. 66.
    67. 67. ResourcesWorkshop wiki https://sites.google.com/site/socialmediainmeded/<br />Twitter & Blogs<br />Podcasts & Wikis<br />Twitter http://twitter.com<br />Top Twitter Myths http://futuredocsblog.com/top-Twitter-myths-tips/<br />Tweetdeck – a mega-Twitter program Twitterberry – Twitter for blackberry Twitterific – especially helpful on iPhone <br />Blogger http://blogger.com<br />WordPress http://wordpress.com<br />Typepad http://www.typepad.com/<br />Kathy’s Blog http://www.mothersinmedicine.com/<br />Vinny’s Blog http://futuredocsblog.com/<br />Apple Garage Band –audio recording software for Mac users http://www.apple.com/ilife/garageband/<br />Audacity - audio recording software (free!) for PC and Mac users http://audacity.sourceforge.net/<br />iTunes – Apple podcast store – buy or find free podcasts to download and listen to http://www.apple.com/itunes/<br />Ben’s Pritzker Podcast http://pritzkerpodcast.com/<br />Google Sites http://sites.google.com<br />PBWorks http://pbworks.com<br />Workshop wiki: https://sites.google.com/site/socialmediainmeded/<br />
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