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Introduction to Social Media: The web is ready for you
Introduction to Social Media: The web is ready for you
Introduction to Social Media: The web is ready for you
Introduction to Social Media: The web is ready for you
Introduction to Social Media: The web is ready for you
Introduction to Social Media: The web is ready for you
Introduction to Social Media: The web is ready for you
Introduction to Social Media: The web is ready for you
Introduction to Social Media: The web is ready for you
Introduction to Social Media: The web is ready for you
Introduction to Social Media: The web is ready for you
Introduction to Social Media: The web is ready for you
Introduction to Social Media: The web is ready for you
Introduction to Social Media: The web is ready for you
Introduction to Social Media: The web is ready for you
Introduction to Social Media: The web is ready for you
Introduction to Social Media: The web is ready for you
Introduction to Social Media: The web is ready for you
Introduction to Social Media: The web is ready for you
Introduction to Social Media: The web is ready for you
Introduction to Social Media: The web is ready for you
Introduction to Social Media: The web is ready for you
Introduction to Social Media: The web is ready for you
Introduction to Social Media: The web is ready for you
Introduction to Social Media: The web is ready for you
Introduction to Social Media: The web is ready for you
Introduction to Social Media: The web is ready for you
Introduction to Social Media: The web is ready for you
Introduction to Social Media: The web is ready for you
Introduction to Social Media: The web is ready for you
Introduction to Social Media: The web is ready for you
Introduction to Social Media: The web is ready for you
Introduction to Social Media: The web is ready for you
Introduction to Social Media: The web is ready for you
Introduction to Social Media: The web is ready for you
Introduction to Social Media: The web is ready for you
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Introduction to Social Media: The web is ready for you

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In this presentation, we introduce Twitter, a popular microblogging service; Delicious, a web-based tool to manage and share bookmarks; and LinkedIn, a professional networking site with over 50 …

In this presentation, we introduce Twitter, a popular microblogging service; Delicious, a web-based tool to manage and share bookmarks; and LinkedIn, a professional networking site with over 50 million members. We provide an overview of each tool, demonstrate uses for teaching, learning and professional networking, as well as review basic security features.

This presentation was developed for and delivered to members of the UMass Medical School community in December 2009 as part of a Social Media Seminar Series sponsored by the Department of Medicine and the Lamar Soutter Library.

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  • Why should we consider social media for use in medical education and the greater UMass community? Social = people Media = Resources Much has changed in the way we communicate and share information because of advancements in technology. It is reasonable to expect these changes affect the way we interact with people in our professional networks. Image: Microsoft Clip Art
  • WHY? We already create and use social networks to share resources. We have networks of colleagues, peers and collaborators. We email, telephone, page, and meet with people all the time. We send articles, discuss publications, ask for help and celebrate successes together. Social media can help facilitate those interactions and provide additional means for communication and collaboration.
  • In this presentation we will provide brief introductions to three common online social media tools which may be helpful to you for teaching & learning, professional development, communication and perhaps research. The three tools we will share are a small sample of the freely available web applications and resources available to you. Te fundamentals of each tool are reflective of all tools in each genre.
  • Social bookmarking is similar to saving a link to a website in your browser ‘favorites’ tool. But the link instead is stored online so you can access your collection anywhere with any computer. Medical Librarians’ Uses and Perceptions of Social Tagging Cecile Bianco University of Massachusetts Medical School, http://escholarship.umassmed.edu/lib_articles/95/
  • It is quick and easy to add the link of website to your favorites folder. However a few extra steps are required to create folders and keep the links organized in such way that you can find a relevant link later on. Creating folders is helpful, however browser favorites are stored locally on that machine only. If you use multiple computers you are left without a single collection of web links. In these images, notice the same four links stored in the favorites folder and in Delicious. A social bookmarking tool like Delicious lets you store links online so they are accessible everywhere, which is a good enough reason by itself to start using such a tool. But social bookmarking also allows you to tag links with keywords. ‘Tagging’ links gives you way to organize links in a more complex, yet easy to use, system. The links are then searchable by keyword.
  • Example, imagine storing a link to a radiology images website. Basic browser favorites tool, this in Internet Explorer. Click, add, that’s it. Easy. If you have created folders to manage your collection of bookmarks you can choose a folder and store the link there.
  • With a simple browser add-in (Explorer, Firefox, Safari) it is just as simple to add a bookmark to Delicious as it is to add it to your browser favorites. You can see in this image that Delicious has fields in which you can add, in addition to the URL, a title, notes and tags. You can tag a link anyway you like. Your keyword selection should reflect why you saved the link, clues to how you will use it, or a category. As you build your collection in Delicious keywords will be suggested to you based on previously used tags in your collection, as well as recommend tags based on how other Delicious users tagged that same link. If you share bookmarks with other people you can choose which network to share that link. These choices can all be edited and updated anytime.
  • Here the keyword ‘medicine’ was entered as a search. The results all have the tag ‘medicine’. You can see how many people tagged each item and see how else they tagged that item. Looking at other tags help you see how other people relate to that item; may lead you to other similar items; you can also view that person’s other bookmarks. Uses: Create a collection of web resources for your course, which may include publications, presentations, charts, tables, graphs, audio/podcasts, video. You could share the collection with colleagues or students. This is a folksonomy, an informal method for cataloging web content.
  • Delicious: default public tagging Interoperable, or ‘mashable’ – RSS based feeds can be subscribed to, published on the web, shared via multiple networks
  • MARY___ Delicious may be useful in these situations. Any users in the audience? Any user feedback? Any questions?
  • Social networking can add another dimension to your professional conversations by including resources outside of the physical institution and your local professional social circles. These resources may include expert opinions from anyone, anywhere in the world, or it may simply be sharing and discussing publications, media or conferences. Today we are looking at LinkedIn. LinkedIn gained popularity as a social network designed to help people tap into their social networks to find leads on jobs. It gave people a place to create a professional profile – including much the same info as a resume or CV – and share that info with people who might have jobs to offer or jobs in their companies or that have friends who’s companies are hiring. With the addition of ‘groups’, LinkedIn began fostering professional discussion forums and collaboration areas. For example, my profile is online and people in my network or extended network (friends of friends) can contact me about places I work or have worked, or schools I have attended. But I can also join groups of professionals in my field or groups based on conferences I attend.
  • MARY lead discussion Traditional social networks. How do you meet new people, professionally? How do you communicate, share info, resources? How do you build your professional network? How are you introduced to new people?
  • Mary continue discussion Social networking is about ‘continuing the conversation’ How do you keep in touch with people professional network? How do maintain working relationships, collaborations?
  • After staring an account, users then create profile. The profile can include as much or as little information as you like. It can be edited at any time. LinkedIn will help you find colleagues based on information you input – such as your employer, your college, your profession With the site search tool you can look for groups based on interests. Creating a LinkedIn Profile. Making connections Joining groups. Communicate.
  • As with any social network, LinkedIn offers you a menu of choices for customizing your network profile and the way you receive information. These settings can be modified at any time. New users may want to leave the applications and features settings open in the beginning, then customize them later based on how many email updates are received from discussions and groups they join. You can choose to receive daily updates or weekly updates or none at all. You can opt to follow discussions or not. Remember: this is a social network. When you join its because you want to connect with people. Allowing other people to search for your profile, view it and contact you is somewhat expected, although your profile can be kept private. Why would someone keep their profile private? LinkedIn Jobs and Answers forums are popular. Someone might want to create a profile just so they can use those services.
  • There are many ways to communicate and collaborate with others in your network. You will receive status updates from you immediate connections (left) so you can stay informed of what people are working on. For example, one friend might have joined a group you were unaware of – that update would be in the feed with a linked to that group which you can check out. Or a colleague might post that they have started a new research project so you would see that in the feed and can ask them about it in the network or in person the next time you see them. LinkedIn has LinkedIn mail as well. You can send messages to people in your network or extended network (groups). This is a great way to meet new people and stay in touch with people you met at conferences or former colleagues. Since the email conversations take place in LinkedIn, a professional relationship is implied and there is no need to give out your work or private email info, or connect with them in a more personal social site like Facebook.
  • Conference groups are a great way to keep extended professional network connections. We can still give out business cards but also now say, ‘hey, find me on LinkedIn.’ There are over 3,400 LinkedIn users with UMassMed affiliations but the group membership is small. It would be interesting to see more people join the group, share information and participate in discussions. Creating a LinkedIn Profile. Making connections Joining groups. Communicate.
  • On this slide answers to an informal question out to UMassMed groups on LinkedIn) MARY ASK AUDIENCE Any users? Why do you use it? Would you recommend it to others? Other networks Library and Facebook
  • ASK AUDIENCE – Experiences with social networks. Depending on time, Mary might share her experiences if audience doesn’t give input. If no time, start summary and move on.
  • Summary: Professional social networks allow us to reconnect with former classmates, former colleagues, current colleagues and peers. The online professional social network allows us to also connect with people we have met only once or twice, such as people met at a conference. We can also meet new people by joining groups and participating in discussion forums. Image: Microsoft Clip Art
  • Short concise bursts of information. Very much like a text message. Only in this case, instead of a text message going to one, two or a handful of friends it is publicly shared – one to many – instead of one to one or one to few. Millions of microbloggers worldwide are sharing billions of posts every day. What are they talking about?
  • IRC– internet relay chat -was the original form of microblogging . Its not a totally new technology. The applications for it are changing, expanding. The market for it is changing, expanding. And the tools available are growing exponentially as more and more people start to do it. There are many uses for microblogging. Those listed here are few. Many people also ‘follow’ sports teams, celebrities, new publications, radio stations, corporations, community organizations. “ Read and/or publish news that is important to you ” is pretty accurate. That news may be information of any kind.
  • Twitter: join the conversation. What does that mean? Instead of trying to explain IRCs and texting and 3 rd party applications, let’s look at it this way. (click) We’ve all been to house parties or dinner parties where we know we’re not going to know anyone other than host or hostess. We plan to go in, do a lap, find a drink then eaves drop until we find an interesting conversation.
  • So at this house party we get the lay of land and we pick up bits of conversation in each room we visit. Sports, local politics, fashion, money, business, entertainment, music, automotive. There seems to be a lot of people talking about a lot of different things, all at the same time. After a while we enter a room and find a conversation that interests us. A smile, a nod and we stand, listening. We tune into what is being said, we try to figure out, by ‘listening between the lines’ what the basis is for the conversation. We begin to recognize the tone of the discussion, can identify the positions the players are taking in the debate. We begin to formulate our own opinions. At some point we are ready to join in the conversation. This is Twitter. When we start using it we find out it is a lot of people having a lot of different conversations all at the same time. It can be confusing, it is most definitely overwhelming. But after awhile we tune in to something that interests us. Then by listening, paying attention, and following the threads of debate we can see how to fit in out opinions and add something to the conversation.
  • Twitter users each have their own unique identities and characteristics. When we start ‘following’ other Twitterers we learn about them and their interests. We can start and stop following these people anytime we like. They will tweet on without us. You might start following someone whose Tweets are relevant to you now ,but after awhile, because your focus has changed or maybe theirs has, you don’t want to read them anymore. That’s OK. People will start and stop following you, too. That is of course if your tweets are publicly available.
  • When you connect with people in Twitter you are creating a social network. When the network you build is professionally based you can tap into that network to ask questions and you can contribute to the general knowledge of the network by sharing links to articles, websites, etc. You can also demonstrate your expertise by helping others solve problems.
  • Twitter profile settings can be adjusted so your profile info reflects who you are. You can keep your Tweets private, but that is just talking to yourself, or using it as a notepad. There are many applications to use Twitter by mobile device – this capability is one of the things that makes Twitter so popular. You can configure Twitter to work backwards and forwards with your cell phone or Blackberry or iPhone. It can even send tweets directly to LinkedIn or other social networks.
  • Twitter, or any microblogging service, could be used for just about anything. It’s a general, all purpose communication tool. What matters is who is in your immediate network and what you want to share and what you want to receive. Image: Microsoft Clip Art
  • Transcript

    • 1. Intro to Social Media The web is ready for you
    • 2. Social = People Media = Resources
    • 3. I know someone who can help you with your project. I recently visited a website that had a list of grant opportunities. What a great article! I’m going to share it with colleagues. I need to get in touch with Joe from that conference last year. I need a research assistant. We got published! I need help with my project. What am I going to do this summer?
    • 4. Intro to Social Media
        • Social bookmarking
          • Tagging, saving, sharing links to online resources
        • Social networking
          • Interacting with people who have similar interests
        • Microblogging
          • Sharing, gathering information in short messages
    • 5. SOCIAL BOOKMARKING Delicious
    • 6. Social Bookmarking
        • Like saving a ‘favorite’ bookmark in a browser so you can find the page again…
        • … with the benefit of being web based, therefore accessible anywhere with internet connection.
      Bianco, Medical Librarians’ Uses and Perceptions of Social Tagging
    • 7. Bowser favorites limit you to a folder structure Delicious lets you ‘ tag ’ items with keywords and add notes that describe what you saved and why you saved it.
    • 8.  
    • 9.  
    • 10. Explore
        • See what other people are tagging
        • Interdisciplinary
          • My tag may be different than someone else’s
          • Leads to thinking about resource in different light
        • Folksonomy
        • Informal classification of web content
        • More than saving links
            • Discover
            • Communicate
            • Collaborate
    • 11. Know Sharing is inherent to social bookmarking, but privacy settings can be altered to suit your needs. Interoperable with other social media such as blogs, RSS readers, and microblogs, or it can be added as a feed to a website.
    • 12. I recently visited a website that had a list of grant opportunities. What a great article! I’m going to share it with colleagues. We got published!
    • 13. SOCIAL NETWORKING LinkedIn
    • 14. Social Networking
      • What?
        • Web based platform for professional interaction, development
      • Why?
        • Find past, present colleagues and classmates
        • Stay fresh, stay informed, stay connected with people who do what you do
        • Professional network expansion without formal introductions
    • 15. Traditional professional social networking
        • Local colleagues
          • Your institution, your former institution, other institutions in your city or state
        • Regional/national conferences
          • Meet more people who share your professional interests
        • List-servs via email
          • Local or regional/national
            • Share expertise among peers
            • Share media, CV, links, engage in ‘discussions’
    • 16. Social media based professional social networking:
        • Local colleagues
          • Your institution, former institution, other institutions in your city or state
        • Regional/national conferences
          • Stay connected with new friends
          • Follow up on conversations
        • Discussion forums
        • Online, accessible; no email logjams
        • More easily share links to websites, online publications & comment on them
    • 17. Create a profile –much like a CV Find colleagues, classmates Find professional interest groups
    • 18. Privacy options for your account allow you to customize settings for your profile and contact information.
    • 19. There are many ways to communicate and collaborate with others in your network. You can share information and resources without having to use your work or personal email.
    • 20. Conference groups are common. It is a way to stay connected with people met or introduce yourself to someone you missed. There are many types of groups. There is a UMass Medical School group and a UMassMed Alumni group.
    • 21. Why use LinkedIn?
      • “ I feel LinkedIn is a great way to have a professional network as compared to other social network, as this forum is only for professional discussions .”
      • “ It's as helpful as you want it to be. Trash in - trash out applies here more than you think. …Like all networking tools, not unlike say, a dinner party - it's hard work, but you can get some very valuable data and connections .”
      • “ I have found myself more active recently-- motivated by immediate professional needs … I found some interesting medical school threads--and found myself conversing with colleagues both in and outside of the Linkedin environment.”
    • 22. Application for LinkedIn
      • “ (Our group) Members are people who have been to our annual conference . In the past we had provided a networking list, but there are about 400 people that come to our conference, so I suggested we use LinkedIn rather than waste paper on multiple pages of contact sheets.  I like it because it involves limited managing. Once (members) are in, they can use it as they like.”
    • 23. I know someone who can help you with your project. What a great article! I’m going to share it with colleagues. I need to get in touch with Joe from that conference last year. I need a research assistant. I need help with my project. What am I going to do this summer?
    • 24. MICROBLOGGING Twitter
    • 25. Microblogging
        • Short, concise bursts of information
        • One-to-many
        • Bite-size bits of information
          • May be: inspiring, thought-provoking, snarky, humorous, insightful, informative, reportive
    • 26.
        • Microblog at conferences
          • Reporting out to people not in attendance
          • A form of note taking
          • Share references to topics, resources presented
          • Many presenters provide info to connect with them
        • Announcement tool
          • Program updates, events, activities, recruitment
        • News feed
          • Find, share news that is important to you
        • Network
          • Create a professional learning network
    • 27. Twitter: join the conversation. What does that mean? Instead of trying to explain IRCs and texting and 3 rd party applications, let’s look at it this way . We’ve all been to house parties or dinner parties where we know we’re not going to know anyone other than host or hostess. We plan to go in, do a lap, find a drink then eavesdrop until we find an interesting conversation.
    • 28. So at this house party we get the lay of land and we pick up bits of conversation in each room we visit. Sports, local politics, fashion, money, business, entertainment, music, automotive. There seems to be a lot of people talking about a lot of different things, all at the same time. After a while we enter a room and find a conversation that interests us. A smile, a nod and we stand, listening. We tune into what is being said, we try to figure out, by ‘listening between the lines’ what the basis is for the conversation. We begin to recognize the tone of the discussion, can identify the positions the players are taking in the debate. We begin to formulate our own opinions. At some point we are ready to join in the conversation. This is Twitter. When we start using it we find out it is a lot of people having a lot of different conversations all at the same time. It can be confusing, it is most definitely overwhelming. But after awhile we tune in to something that interests us. Then by listening, paying attention, and following the threads of debate we can see how to fit in out opinions and add something to the conversation.
    • 29. Twitter users each have their own unique identities and characteristics. When we start ‘following’ other Twitterers we learn about them and their interests. We can start and stop following these people anytime we like. They will tweet on without us. You might start following someone whose Tweets are relevant to you now, but after awhile, because your focus has changed or maybe theirs has, you don’t want to read them anymore. That’s OK. People will start and stop following you, too. That is of course if your tweets are publicly available.
    • 30. When you connect with people in Twitter you are creating a social network. When the network you build is professionally based you can tap into that network to ask questions and you can contribute to the general knowledge of the network by sharing links to articles, websites, etc. You can also demonstrate your expertise by helping others solve problems.
    • 31.  
    • 32. Microblogging with Twitter
      • Join the conversation
      • Listen
      • Find people with similar interests
      • Create a network
      • Gather info
      • Share info
      • Demonstrate expertise
    • 33. I know someone who can help you with your project. I recently visited a website that had a list of grant opportunities. What a great article! I’m going to share it with colleagues. I need to get in touch with Joe from that conference last year. I need a research assistant. We got published! I need help with my project. What am I going to do this summer?
    • 34. Intro to Social Media
        • Social bookmarking
          • Tag, save, share links to online resources
        • Social networking
          • Stay connected colleagues, friends, peers
        • Microblogging
          • Rapidly share and gather information
    • 35. Carrie: Join my network! http://delicious.com/carri.saari http://linkedin.com/in/clsaarinen http://twitter.com/MedicineUMMS http://twitter.com/SocialMediaUMMS
      • Mary: Join my network!
        • http://delicious.com/piorunm
        • http://www.linkedin.com/in/piorunm
        • http://twitter.com/UMMSLibrary
    • 36. Resources
      • You can find all you need to know about creating and managing accounts:
          • http://help.twitter.com
          • http://delicious.com/help
          • http://learn.linkedin.com

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