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Week 9 LIVE Class 2010
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Week 9 LIVE Class 2010

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  • 1. © Carrie Heeter, 2010 Foundations of Serious Games Professor Carrie Heeter
  • 2. © Carrie Heeter, 2010 GAME FOR CHANGE  Daniel  The McDonalds Game GAMES FOR LEARNING  Kari  Wolfquest    Kristy  Do I Have a Right   INNOVATIVE INDIE GAME  Derek  Spectre NEXT WEEK: Mete Greg Kristine John
  • 3. © Carrie Heeter, 2010  Kristy, 91 points  Kari, 51 points  Daniel, 48 points  Ted, 46 points  Derek, 43 points  Carolyn, 34 points  Greg, 34 points  Alan, 34 points  Kristine, 30 points  Steve, 25 points Example of poorly designed gamification…
  • 4. © Carrie Heeter, 2010
  • 5. © Carrie Heeter, 2010 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 Finals 10/27 11/3 11/10 11/17 11/24 12/1 12/5 12/15 playtest final game Meaningful Play report due Playtest report due Final project web site, game due Graded on quality of RESEARCH. A successful playtest informs important design CHANGES. (Confirming that your game was perfect would be a failed Playtest.) (no LIVE class)
  • 6. © Carrie Heeter, 2010  Missing Link  History  Ctrl Alt Del
  • 7. © Carrie Heeter, 2010  Week 9  Brainstorm again with a renewed, deeper understanding of your audience, the need, the content. Decide on a core game mechanic and direction  Weeks 9 & 10  Continue research on all fronts  Develop rough paper prototype of some aspect of your game, with a clear idea of the questions you want to answer.  Your prototype is your hypothesis!
  • 8. © Carrie Heeter, 2010  Game Design Workshop  Games for Change Toolkit  Conduct and watch game analyses of ~30 games  Indoctrinate to culture of iteration  Practice envisioning and revising game ideas  Assign you to fill yourselves with content and user knowledge
  • 9. © Carrie Heeter, 2010  Known domain, goals, player  Brainstorm again, thinking freely about the game mechanic  Notice how different brainstorming feels when you understand the problem space better and have a general direction.
  • 10. © Carrie Heeter, 2010  Try it out!  (Remember our play acting exercise?)  Central starting point:  Is your game playable?  Then you can tweak content and fun and values. PITFALL: making it too complicated
  • 11. © Carrie Heeter, 2010  Some experts even change them DURING a playtest, or between playtests  A great prototype is one you can make quickly and change easily PITFALL: making it to polished
  • 12. © Carrie Heeter, 2010  Do what you say you will, on time.  Everything takes longer than you think – allow time  Communicate clearly. Call for help if you run into trouble. PITFALL: not being ready
  • 13. © Carrie Heeter, 2010  I’m happy to meet with any team or individual. Just let me know.