Isaac merrit singer

961 views
885 views

Published on

Published in: Education, Business, Lifestyle
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
961
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
8
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Born in Pittstown, New York, Singer spent much of his youth devoted to acting. At age 38, when his career in show business proved unsuccessful, Singer settled in New York to focus on inventing full-time. Singer had always possessed an exceptional aptitude for all things mechanical. At the age of 19 he worked as an apprentice machinist, and in 1839 he patented a rock-drilling machine while working with an older brother to help dig the Illinois waterway. Ten years later he patented a metal- and wood-carving machine.
  • This machine combined elements of Thimonnier's, Hunt's, and Howe's machines. He was granted an American patent in 1851 and it was suggested he patent the foot pedal (or treadle ) used to power some of his machines; however, it had been in use for too long for a patent to be issued. When Howe learned of Singer’s machine he took him to court. Howe won and Singer was forced to pay a lump sum for all machines already produced. Singer then took out a license under Howe’s patent and paid him $1.15 per machine. Singer then entered a joint partnership with a lawyer named Edward Clark, and they formed the first hire-purchase (time payment) scheme to allow people to afford to buy their machines. At first, Singer's sewing machine didn't sell. Priced at over $100, the machine proved far too expensive for the average American household. Husbands generally controlled the family purse strings at the time, and most of them saw no need to spend money on a labor-saving device for making clothing their wives already made with a needle and thread. There was no market for the machine in the garment industry either, where workers labored long hours with little pay.
  • At first, Singer's sewing machine didn't sell. Priced at over $100, the machine proved far too expensive for the average American household. Husbands generally controlled the family purse strings at the time, and most of them saw no need to spend money on a labor-saving device for making clothing their wives already made with a needle and thread. There was no market for the machine in the garment industry either, where workers labored long hours with little pay. In late 1857, Singer opened the world's first mass production facility for something other than firearms in New York. I.M. Singer & Company was soon able to cut production costs to a little more than $10 per machine. Singer sold his new machines for 50% less than his first, yet had increased his profit margin to 530% per machine.
  • Isaac Singer saw the potential in transferring Samuel Colt's hand-gun manufacturing techniques to the production of Singer sewing machines with interchangeable parts. His machine used a flying shuttle instead of a rotary one; the needle was mounted vertically and included a presser foot to hold the cloth in place. It had a fixed arm to hold the needle and included a basic tensioning system.
  • installment selling or time payment purchases. As a result, individuals with even meager income could own a Singer sewing machine. Even better, they could increase their productivity, earn more money and improve their position in life. the world's first practical sewing machine. This machine had a straight eye-pointed needle and transverse shuttle, an overhanging arm, a table to support the cloth, a presser foot to hold the material against the upward stroke of the needle, and a roughened feed wheel extending through a slot in the table. Motion was communicated to the needle arm and shuttle by means of gears.
  • Isaac merrit singer

    1. 1. Sewing Machine
    2. 2. Background Info…. <ul><li>Born in Pittstown, NY </li></ul><ul><li>Apprentice machinist </li></ul><ul><li>Full-time inventor </li></ul><ul><li>Earlier patents </li></ul>
    3. 3. Singer Sewing Machine… <ul><li>1851 Patent </li></ul><ul><li>Earlier models by Thimonnier, Hunt, and Howe </li></ul><ul><li>Howe vs. Singer </li></ul>
    4. 4. Singer Sewing Machine… <ul><li>Expensive to affordable </li></ul><ul><li>$100+ </li></ul><ul><li>1857 New York I.M Singer & Co. </li></ul>
    5. 5. How it works… <ul><li>Interchangeable parts </li></ul><ul><li>Vertical needle </li></ul><ul><li>Presser foot </li></ul><ul><li>Fixed arm </li></ul>
    6. 6. How it works… Antique Singer Hand Crank Sewing Machine
    7. 7. Why it’s needed… <ul><li>Payment plans </li></ul><ul><li>Household necessity </li></ul><ul><li>Increase productivity </li></ul><ul><li>More efficient </li></ul>
    8. 8. Singer Sewing Machine… <ul><li>If I were you… </li></ul><ul><li>I would buy a singer sewing machine :] </li></ul>

    ×