Stepping Onto the Invisible Bridge: How to Connect
with Your Online Students
Patrick G. Ray; Senior Program Associate Dean...
What is Instructional Immediacy?
• “People are drawn toward persons and things they like,
evaluate highly, and prefer; and...
Examples of Immediacy
• Engaging in humor
• Asking questions
• Addressing students by name
• Encouragement of discussion
•...
Can you spot the differences?
Instructor Bio
• My name is Professor Smith. I
was born in Nashville, TN. I
teach and am und...
Online is not inferior…
• …it’s just different!
• Self-fulfilling prophecy: If you approach teaching online in the
same wa...
Effects of Instructional Immediacy in Online
Classrooms (Glenda Gunter; 2007)
• Analyzed four relationships in online cour...
Instructional Immediacy Online (Gunter; continued)
• A lack of face-to-face interaction means validation even more
critica...
2012 Survey of Online Learning (Babson Research
Group)
students in higher education taking at least one
course online
acad...
GEEEEEYAAAAAHHHH…RUN!!!
DON’T OPEN THA---…OH EM GEE!!!
“Hang on, lady! We’re going for a ride!!!”
“He’s not nuts. He’s crazy!”
Where is it? I can’t see it! How do I know it’s there?
“Nobody can jump this!”
“It’s a leap of faith…”
“You must believe!”
Why do we have to be reminded to…be nice?
• Conflicting priorities = We do not apply those immediate behaviors
• Not artic...
http://screencast-o-matic.com/watch/cIfjDjVral
“Community of Inquiry”
Rourke, Anderson, Garrison, and Archer (2001) – identify with the
community & develop relationships...
Chickering & Gamson’s Seven Principles
of Good Practice
1. Encourage contact between students and faculty: Frequent studen...
Seven Principles (cont.)
5. Emphasize time on task: Faculty should create opportunities for
students to practice good time...
GOOD
CUSTOMER
SERVICE
EXHIBIT A:
EXHIBIT B:
EXHIBIT C:
EXHIBIT D:
Online Instructional Immediacy Strategies
• Introduce yourself to your students in a unique
fashion
– Channels of personal...
Unique Introductions
• Screencast-O-Matic: http://www.screencast-o-
matic.com/
– http://screencast-o-matic.com/watch/clXvD...
Adapt Communication to Different Learning Styles
• Bubbl.us: https://bubbl.us (online, collaborative brain-storming)
– htt...
Soliciting Student Feedback
• SurveyMonkey: http://www.surveymonkey.com/
• Poll Everywhere: http://www.polleverywhere.com/...
Online Immediacy Tools…FREE!
• Presentations – Popplet; Prezi; Ahead…
• Screencasting – Screencast-O-Matic; Jing…
• Visual...
Thank you.
Patrick G. Ray; Senior Program Associate Dean
FORTIS Online
Website: www.peegeeray.com
Bookmarks: www.delicious...
FAPSC 2013 Annual Conference Presentation: Connecting with Online Students
FAPSC 2013 Annual Conference Presentation: Connecting with Online Students
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FAPSC 2013 Annual Conference Presentation: Connecting with Online Students

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Practical discussion of methods for connecting with distance education students online. This powerpoint comes from my breakout session held at the 2013 FAPSC Conference in Miami, FL.

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FAPSC 2013 Annual Conference Presentation: Connecting with Online Students

  1. 1. Stepping Onto the Invisible Bridge: How to Connect with Your Online Students Patrick G. Ray; Senior Program Associate Dean FORTIS Online
  2. 2. What is Instructional Immediacy? • “People are drawn toward persons and things they like, evaluate highly, and prefer; and they avoid or move away from things they dislike, evaluate negatively, or do not prefer“ – Albert Mehrabian (1971) – “Principle of immediacy“ • Joan Gorham (1988) – expanded to include verbal interaction that increased psychological closeness between teachers and students • Affective Learning – learning occurs more often, and to a greater degree, when participants are involved emotionally
  3. 3. Examples of Immediacy • Engaging in humor • Asking questions • Addressing students by name • Encouragement of discussion • Following up on student-initiated comments • Encouraging student expression of opinions • Sharing of personal examples
  4. 4. Can you spot the differences? Instructor Bio • My name is Professor Smith. I was born in Nashville, TN. I teach and am underpaid. If you have questions, read the syllabus. You may contact me from 1-1:25pm on Wed during my lunch. Thanks. Welcome to College Success! • Hi, Class! My name is Jim Guerrina. In addition to teaching this course, I serve as the Supervisor for Education Programs at Seaworld, Orlando. Currently, I am pursuing my MBA with a concentration in Finance. My office hours are 5-8pm on Wednesdays, or by appointment. If you are ever in need of assistance, please do not hesitate to contact me. I look forward to speaking with you all!
  5. 5. Online is not inferior… • …it’s just different! • Self-fulfilling prophecy: If you approach teaching online in the same way that you approach teaching on ground, then you create a poor facsimile of the residential experience, and it WILL be inferior. • Leverage what makes online unique!
  6. 6. Effects of Instructional Immediacy in Online Classrooms (Glenda Gunter; 2007) • Analyzed four relationships in online courses: 1. Teacher-Student 2. Student-Student 3. Student-Content 4. Student-Computer • Impetus – high dropout rates in online courses • Most cited reason for student dissatisfaction: lack of social presence (feeling of closeness & community), feelings of isolation, lack of interaction with instructor and other students.
  7. 7. Instructional Immediacy Online (Gunter; continued) • A lack of face-to-face interaction means validation even more critical. • Online interactions increase a student’s self-efficacy which positively affects motivation – Students believe they can succeed! • Positive correlation between immediacy & increased time on task – Improved cognitive outcomes • Undergrad students who participated in class discussions more than 75% of the time earned significantly higher GPAs than other students (Rovai; 2007)
  8. 8. 2012 Survey of Online Learning (Babson Research Group) students in higher education taking at least one course online academic leaders rate learning outcomes same or superior to face-to-face say online is critical to long-term strategy • HOWEVER…only believe their faculty accept the value & legitimacy of online ed.
  9. 9. GEEEEEYAAAAAHHHH…RUN!!!
  10. 10. DON’T OPEN THA---…OH EM GEE!!!
  11. 11. “Hang on, lady! We’re going for a ride!!!” “He’s not nuts. He’s crazy!”
  12. 12. Where is it? I can’t see it! How do I know it’s there? “Nobody can jump this!”
  13. 13. “It’s a leap of faith…” “You must believe!”
  14. 14. Why do we have to be reminded to…be nice? • Conflicting priorities = We do not apply those immediate behaviors • Not articulated in policies/handbook = Lack of focus/awareness • Karla Jensen (1999) - faculty could successfully learn to use such after participating in an immediacy training program. Faculty participating in such training increased their use of verbal immediacy behaviors by 42 percent and, consequently, experienced a 59 percent increase in student participation in class compared to those in the control group
  15. 15. http://screencast-o-matic.com/watch/cIfjDjVral
  16. 16. “Community of Inquiry” Rourke, Anderson, Garrison, and Archer (2001) – identify with the community & develop relationships (social); facilitation for purpose of realizing personally meaningful outcomes (teaching); & extent learners are able to construct & confirm meaning through sustained discourse (cognitive).
  17. 17. Chickering & Gamson’s Seven Principles of Good Practice 1. Encourage contact between students and faculty: Frequent student- faculty contact both in and outside of class is an important factor in student motivation and involvement. 2. Develop reciprocity and cooperation among students: Faculty should create and encourage opportunities for collaborative learning among students. 3. Encourages active learning: Faculty should require students to apply their learning in oral and written forms. 4. Give prompt feedback: Faculty should provide appropriate and prompt feedback on performance. Students need help assessing their current competence and performance, and need frequent opportunities to perform and receive suggestion for improvement. Such feedback should be an ongoing process in collegiate settings.
  18. 18. Seven Principles (cont.) 5. Emphasize time on task: Faculty should create opportunities for students to practice good time management. This includes setting realistic time for students to complete assignments as well as using class time for learning opportunities. 6. Communicate high expectations: Faculty should set and communicate high expectations for students. Such becomes a self- fulfilling prophecy for students and they often will rise to meet the challenge. 7. Respect diverse talents and ways of learning: Faculty should create learning opportunities that appeal to the different ways students will process and attend to information. Varying presentation style and assignment requirement will allow students to showcase their unique talents and learn in ways that work for them.
  19. 19. GOOD CUSTOMER SERVICE
  20. 20. EXHIBIT A:
  21. 21. EXHIBIT B:
  22. 22. EXHIBIT C:
  23. 23. EXHIBIT D:
  24. 24. Online Instructional Immediacy Strategies • Introduce yourself to your students in a unique fashion – Channels of personalization • Use technology to appeal to multiple modalities of learning – Charts/Visualizations – Video content – Create a sense of direct instruction to achieve collective ownership in the course • Solicit feedback from your students during class
  25. 25. Unique Introductions • Screencast-O-Matic: http://www.screencast-o- matic.com/ – http://screencast-o-matic.com/watch/clXvD2VedY • Slideroll: http://www.slideroll.com/ – http://slideroll.com/?s=7p4neugw • Capzles: http://www.capzles.com/ – http://www.capzles.com/c863adf1-d31b-49d3-a3a9- 0fa4be1423e8
  26. 26. Adapt Communication to Different Learning Styles • Bubbl.us: https://bubbl.us (online, collaborative brain-storming) – https://bubbl.us/?h=da259/303484/890ZYrqxuakpg • Popplet: http://popplet.com/ (visualizing & presentation tool; lots of options) – http://popplet.com/app/#/1136850 • YouTube: • TubeChop http://www.tubechop.com/ (easily chop interesting sections from YouTube videos to share) – http://www.tubechop.com/watch/1347192 • DragON Tape http://www.dragontape.com (mix tapes for Youtube; can string different videos together into one presentation) – http://www.dragontape.com/#!/5930324412334080
  27. 27. Soliciting Student Feedback • SurveyMonkey: http://www.surveymonkey.com/ • Poll Everywhere: http://www.polleverywhere.com/ (solicit feedback via text messages; 40 people or less = free) • PollDaddy: http://polldaddy.com/ (200 responses/month & 10 question survey max = free)
  28. 28. Online Immediacy Tools…FREE! • Presentations – Popplet; Prezi; Ahead… • Screencasting – Screencast-O-Matic; Jing… • Visualizers – Tagxedo; Bubbl.us; Diagram.ly… • Whiteboards/Screensharing – Join.me; Twiddla; Oneeko… • Survey – SurveyMonkey; PollDaddy… • Lots of cool, dynamic resources out there…43 things (share goals/priorities); LetterPop (newsletter generator)…
  29. 29. Thank you. Patrick G. Ray; Senior Program Associate Dean FORTIS Online Website: www.peegeeray.com Bookmarks: www.delicious.com/carpefuturum twitter: carpefuturum Email: pray@fortiscollege.edu Phone: (866) 353-9919
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