Webinar 1/ Round Table 1 Collaborative Learning, Cooperative Learning and Active Learning Students: Carolina Lima Larissa ...
Collaborative Learning <ul><li>What is Collaborative Learning? </li></ul><ul><li>Collaborative learning is a method of tea...
Collaborative Learning <ul><li>The Conditions for Effective Collaborative Learning </li></ul><ul><li>Group composition </l...
Collaborative Learning <ul><li>What a CL session consist of </li></ul><ul><li>Chair or Leader </li></ul><ul><li>Time Keepe...
Collaborative Learning <ul><li>It's advantages/benefits </li></ul><ul><li>Celebration of diversity </li></ul><ul><li>Ackno...
Collaborative Learning Strategies <ul><li>THINK-PAIR-SHARE </li></ul><ul><li>(1) The instructor poses a question, and give...
Collaborative Learning <ul><li>The objectives and goals using CL </li></ul><ul><ul><li>develop and share a common goal </l...
Cooperative Learning <ul><li>What is Cooperative Learning? </li></ul><ul><li>Cooperative learningis a specific kind of col...
Cooperative Learning <ul><li>Similarities between cooperative and collaborative learning </li></ul><ul><li>Stress the impo...
Cooperative Learning Differences between cooperative and collaborative learning <ul><li>Cooperative </li></ul><ul><li>Stud...
Cooperative Learning <ul><li>Critical perspectives </li></ul><ul><li>Small-group work, some claim, is an avoidance of teac...
Active Learning <ul><li>Through it you can explore a set of learning experiences that can be more effective and interestin...
Active Learning <ul><li>Active Listening </li></ul><ul><li>Active listening intentionally focuses on who you are listening...
Active Learning <ul><li>Looking/seeing </li></ul><ul><li>Looking at images, such as pictures and graphs and maps. Trying t...
Active Learning <ul><li>Seeing and hearing: </li></ul><ul><li>In addition to PowerPoint lectures, multimedia and movies ha...
Active learning <ul><li>Classroom, online and public presentations </li></ul><ul><li>Developing, producing, practicing and...
Active Learning <ul><li>Saying and doing: </li></ul><ul><li>Interviewing and developing oral histories; role playing, perf...
Active learning <ul><li>Writing? </li></ul><ul><li>Writing is communicating/expressing what students learned, a method of ...
Active Learning Cone of Learning adapted from Edgar Dale (1946)
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Webinar 1

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Webinar 1

  1. 1. Webinar 1/ Round Table 1 Collaborative Learning, Cooperative Learning and Active Learning Students: Carolina Lima Larissa Ambrósio
  2. 2. Collaborative Learning <ul><li>What is Collaborative Learning? </li></ul><ul><li>Collaborative learning is a method of teaching and learning in which students team together to solve a problem, complete a task, or create a project. </li></ul>
  3. 3. Collaborative Learning <ul><li>The Conditions for Effective Collaborative Learning </li></ul><ul><li>Group composition </li></ul><ul><li>Task features </li></ul><ul><li>Communication media </li></ul>
  4. 4. Collaborative Learning <ul><li>What a CL session consist of </li></ul><ul><li>Chair or Leader </li></ul><ul><li>Time Keeper </li></ul><ul><li>Room Scheduler </li></ul><ul><li>Resource Arranger </li></ul><ul><li>Group Process Evaluator </li></ul><ul><li>Producer or Participant </li></ul><ul><li>Resource Person </li></ul>
  5. 5. Collaborative Learning <ul><li>It's advantages/benefits </li></ul><ul><li>Celebration of diversity </li></ul><ul><li>Acknowledgment of individual differences </li></ul><ul><li>Interpersonal development </li></ul><ul><li>Actively involving students in learning </li></ul><ul><li>More opportunities for personal feedback </li></ul>
  6. 6. Collaborative Learning Strategies <ul><li>THINK-PAIR-SHARE </li></ul><ul><li>(1) The instructor poses a question, and gives students about a minute to think through an appropriate response. (2) Students then turn to a partner and share their responses. (3) Student responses can be shared within a larger group or with an entire class during a follow-up discussion. All students have an opportunity to learn by reflection and by verbalization.  </li></ul>
  7. 7. Collaborative Learning <ul><li>The objectives and goals using CL </li></ul><ul><ul><li>develop and share a common goal </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>contribute your understanding of the problem </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>respond to, and work to understand, others' questions, insights and solutions. Each member empowers the other to speak and contribute, and to consider their contributions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>You are dependent on and accountable for others, and they depend on and accountable for you </li></ul></ul>
  8. 8. Cooperative Learning <ul><li>What is Cooperative Learning? </li></ul><ul><li>Cooperative learningis a specific kind of collaborative learning. </li></ul><ul><li>Students work together in small groups on a structured activity. They are individually accountable for their work, and the work of the group as a whole is also assessed. </li></ul>
  9. 9. Cooperative Learning <ul><li>Similarities between cooperative and collaborative learning </li></ul><ul><li>Stress the importance of active learning. </li></ul><ul><li>Teaching and learning are experiences shared by both the student and the teacher. </li></ul><ul><li>Enhance higher order cognitive skills. </li></ul><ul><li>Greater emphasis is placed on students' responsibility for taking charge of her or his learning. </li></ul><ul><li>Involve situations where students must articulate ideas in small groups. </li></ul><ul><li>Help students develop social and teambuilding skills. </li></ul><ul><li>Increase student success and information retention. </li></ul>
  10. 10. Cooperative Learning Differences between cooperative and collaborative learning <ul><li>Cooperative </li></ul><ul><li>Students receive training in small group social skills. </li></ul><ul><li>Activities are structured with each student having a specific role. </li></ul><ul><li>The teacher observes, listens and intervenes in a group when necessary. </li></ul><ul><li>Students submit work at the end of class for evaluation. </li></ul><ul><li>Collaborative </li></ul><ul><li>There is the belief that students already have the necessary social skills, and that they will build on their existing skills in order to reach their goals. </li></ul><ul><li>Students organize and negotiate efforts themselves. </li></ul><ul><li>The activity is not monitored by the instructor. When questions are directed towards the teacher, the teacher guides the students to the information needed. </li></ul><ul><li>Students retain drafts to complete further work. </li></ul>
  11. 11. Cooperative Learning <ul><li>Critical perspectives </li></ul><ul><li>Small-group work, some claim, is an avoidance of teaching. Dividing the class into small groups allows the teacher to escape responsibility. </li></ul><ul><li>Making members of the group responsible for each other's learning. In mixed-ability groups, the result is often that stronger students are left to teach weaker students and do most of the work. </li></ul><ul><li>Encouraging only lower-level thinking and ignoring the strategies necessary for the inclusion of critical or higher-level thought. In small groups, there is sometimes only enough time to focus on the task at its most basic level. </li></ul>
  12. 12. Active Learning <ul><li>Through it you can explore a set of learning experiences that can be more effective and interesting, and you can take more responsibility for your education. This is especially critical in an online environment where you may not even meet your teacher or fellow students. </li></ul>
  13. 13. Active Learning <ul><li>Active Listening </li></ul><ul><li>Active listening intentionally focuses on who you are listening to, whether in a lecture, in a conversation, or a group, in order to understand what is said. Student must be able to “replay” with his/her own words what they said to their satisfaction. </li></ul>
  14. 14. Active Learning <ul><li>Looking/seeing </li></ul><ul><li>Looking at images, such as pictures and graphs and maps. Trying to understand the use and importance of each image: students may enter key words that come to their minds. </li></ul>
  15. 15. Active Learning <ul><li>Seeing and hearing: </li></ul><ul><li>In addition to PowerPoint lectures, multimedia and movies have the advantage of illustrating reading and lecture content in new (engaging) formats. </li></ul><ul><li>Demonstrations and field trips build on classroom experiences can make students individuals with a shared learning experience on a topic and also enable them as learners to witness how concepts are practiced or exemplified in real life processes or situations </li></ul>
  16. 16. Active learning <ul><li>Classroom, online and public presentations </li></ul><ul><li>Developing, producing, practicing and delivering speeches and presentations;  multi-media and interactive programs; newsletters, Websites and blogs, etc. </li></ul>
  17. 17. Active Learning <ul><li>Saying and doing: </li></ul><ul><li>Interviewing and developing oral histories; role playing, performing, debating through opposing points of view; case studies and problem-based learning, gaming and simulations; research projects and symposiums; developing models; student teaching . </li></ul>
  18. 18. Active learning <ul><li>Writing? </li></ul><ul><li>Writing is communicating/expressing what students learned, a method of evaluating what they know, as well as an active learning exercise. </li></ul><ul><li>In pairs or a group, online or in person, students can read and react to what other learners posted/wrote </li></ul>
  19. 19. Active Learning Cone of Learning adapted from Edgar Dale (1946)

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