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There are Birds in the Library (Poster)

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Poster presented at EGSS 2012 Conference. Citation: Thurlow, N., & Hank, C. (2012). There are birds in the library. Examining adoption and use of Twitter by Canadian academic libraries. Poster …

Poster presented at EGSS 2012 Conference. Citation: Thurlow, N., & Hank, C. (2012). There are birds in the library. Examining adoption and use of Twitter by Canadian academic libraries. Poster presented at the Education Graduate Students’ Society (EGSS) 11th Annual Conference, McGill University, Montreal, QC.

Published in: Education, Technology

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  • 1. tweet tweetTHERE ARE BIRDS IN THE LIBRARYEXAMINING ADOPTION & USE OF TWITTER BY CANADIAN ACADEMIC LIBRARIESNina Thurlow and Carolyn Hank, School of Information Studies, McGill University 1 abstract 2 method As academic libraries adopt Web 2.0 innovations, it’s Academic libraries were identified from the member listing of important to understand if and how social networking tools, the Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada (AUCC). such as Twitter, are used, and the resulting impact, both From the 94 colleges and universities listed, the main libraries perceived and real. For example, when students follow a of each were identified. The libraries were then coded to library’s Twitter feed, it may be seen to contribute to a rise assess eligibility for inclusion in the study across six factors, as in students awareness of the library and its services. Before presented in the results section below. For those qualifying presuming how Twitter can help position the library of the libraries, characterized as having active Twitter accounts at future, it is important to establish a baseline of adoption least six months old, data was collected across eleven now. This poster presents preliminary findings from an additional categories in order to provide a profile of their analysis of tweeting by Canadian academic libraries, tweeting activities. including the ‘who,’ the ‘how often,’ and the ‘for how long.’3 results SAMPLE 100% 81% 80% 38% 33% 31% who is tweeting? 31% All listed colleges English language Library Library Current Account 6+ and universities institute web page Twitter tweets months old N=94 n=76 n=75 n=36 n=31 = 29 TWEETING FOLLOWING FIRST TWEET PUBLISHING 118 25 532 demographics = 29 (mean) 7% 2008 jan-jun mean tweets mean tweets 2009 jan-jun per month to date 34% { 0 range 1319 21% 2009 jul-dec January 2011 24% do not ask to “follow them” from library homepage { FOLLOWERS 544 17% 14% 2010 jan-jun 2010 jul-dec (mean) 7% 2011 jan-jun 13 range 1817 1 range 187 4 wrap-up 5 up next Few academic libraries have jumped on the Twitter bandwagon. Student and faculty perceptions of academic library tweets. For those that have, they are active, with up-to-date tweets. Content analysis of academic library tweets. It is used more as social broadcast tool (e.g., one-to-many) Differences in tweeting activities and perceptions between than social networking tool (e.g., one-to-one or one-to-few). Canadian academic libraries and Canadian public libraries. Interested in hearing more? Contact the authors at nina.thurlow@mail.mcgill.ca or carolyn.hank@mcgill.ca