Networking And Social Media  Part 1
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Networking And Social Media Part 1

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Slides to accompany Walter Akana's discussion on Social Media, Part One.

Slides to accompany Walter Akana's discussion on Social Media, Part One.

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  • Today, we want to begin to give you some exposure to social media and it’s power to support belonging by helping people find shared communities of interest. There is a lot of content, which covers 6 areas, broken down into two broad sections: Background and Getting Started Venturing into the social world, a metaphor; Groundswell and the structure of the social web; Reasons to even concern yourself with any of this; Three keys to getting started; We will try to get through as possible, but want to encourage your questions – even fit we do the relationship building portion in a follow up session. Using the Social Web to Build Relationships What you can do on major social networking sites; Making Twitter your primary day-to-day tool for learning, sharing and interacting with people with shared interests. When people hear terms like networking, social networking, or social media, they can feel a little intimidated…and find lots of reasons to reject them… Yet, the key thing to remember is they are SOCIAL … and you already have a long history of being social … a history that goes way back!
  • On your first day of school, it was you and your stuff. Maybe you had some idea about meeting other people, but it was all kind of vague... All seemed easy enough…but then…
  • As adults, life has taught you that it’s really a much bigger world… but just how big?
  • But then you discover the social world on lie is … BIG… and overwhelming! Fortunately, there are those who’ve gone before you and figured out a structure. You can be guided by what you want to do. It’s also fortunate that you can narrow your focus even more… Source: http://www.mojofiti.com/2009/12/the-state-of-social-media-december-2009/
  • Charlene Li and Josh Bernoff, in their book, Groundswell , examine the transformational power of social media, and classify the different technologies of that people are using to get what they need from each other, rather than from traditional institutions (how they define the “groundswell” ). While they point to the technologies, the never lose sight of the relationships that technologies facilitate. If you use any of these, you are using social media…. Let’s take a look at the technologies they classify are… … starting with the less familiar and more technical … then moving to technologies you may already be using… --------------------------------------------------------------------- Notes:   1.User-generated content includes articles, videos, and slideshares. 2.Social networks like LI, Facebook; virtual worlds like Second Life 3.Wikis like Wikipedia and other private shared content sites; open source refers to freely available code for software development 4.Forums, ratings, and reviews include Yahoo, Google and AOL groups, and specialized forums; ratings and reviews are sites like e-bay, TripAdvisor, Epinions 5.Content organizing and tags (and sharing) like Digg, Del.icio.us, but also tags at blogs, YouTube and other sites 6.Really Simple Syndication provides the ability to feed content from arrange of sites including news, blogs, and even photo sharing; widgets are mini-applications used to meet a variety of needs.                          
  • Online collaboration has been happening for a very long time. In fact, collaboration among technical professionals has laid the ground work for what is today’s internet and world wide web. Online collaboration has also brought us “open source” operating systems like Linux, and a host of office tools based on it – OpenOffice being one example. Wikipedia: encyclopedia…we all know Perhaps a better known form of online collaboration is the wiki, and perhaps the best know wiki is Wikipedia – a collaboratively authored encyclopedia. There are other wikis: wikiHow: Manual writing collaboration MediaWiki is a web-based wiki software application used by all projects of the Wikimedia Foundation, and many other wikis. … even wetpaint , home of this NNP community, is a wiki Notes: 1. “The name "Wikipedia" is a portmanteau of the words wiki (a technology for creating collaborative websites , from the Hawaiian word wiki , meaning "quick") and encyclopedia . “ 2. “Linux: Unix-like computer operating systems based on the Linux kernel. Their development is one of the most prominent examples of free and open source software collaboration; citation all the underlying source code can be used, freely modified, and redistributed, both commercially and non-commercially, by anyone under licenses such as the GNU GPL.” 3. “OpenOffice.org 3 is the leading open-source office software suite for word processing, spreadsheets, presentations, graphics, databases and more. It is available in many languages and works on all common computers. It stores all your data in an international open standard format and can also read and write files from other common office software packages. It can be downloaded and used completely free of charge for any purpose.” 4. MediaWiki is a web-based wiki software application used by all projects of the Wikimedia Foundation, and many other wikis. Originally developed to serve the needs of the free content Wikipedia encyclopedia, today it has also been deployed by companies for internal knowledge management, and as a content management system.
  • In a sense, RSS, or Real Simple Syndication is a big part of the foundation of social technologies. It drives user created content, including blog posts, Facebook updates, news feeds, stock quotes, sports updates…you name it… Supporting syndication of content are services like Feedburner….and FeedBlitz… which power subscriptions As well, there are lots of RSS driven web pages. For example, Netvibes: a leading personal start page to manage your digital life. Add widget to read your newspapers, play games, watch TV, movies, listen to podcasts, ... When you think of “widgets,” think too of gadgets ...there are a host of these… that you can run on a customized google start page, or in some cases accessed directly over the web. Google gadgets include everything from quote of the day apps to currency converters, to tools like calendar, docs, clocks, and talk.…
  • Yahoo and Google groups can be set up by any one and cover a wide variety of topics. Trip Advisor provides unbiased hotel reviews, photos and travel advice for hotels and vacations (compare prices with just one click). Mac Forums is a discussion forum for Mac, Apple, iPhone and iPod related topics. Epinions: a general consumer review site that was established in 1999. RateMyProfessor …well, you get the idea…
  • On the web, when people find things they like, they tend to want to share them with others. Social book marking sites like delicious, digg, and StumbleUpon are useful ways for folks to set up web-based book marks that they can reference….and share. Underlying this is the potential to identify and follow people with like interests – though true relationship building is subtle…or rare. More generally, the use of “tags” is found on virtually all social sites on the web – whether it’s on social book marking sites, blots or photo sites like Flickr. Notes: “ Social bookmarking is a method for Internet users to share, organize, search, and manage bookmarks of web resources. Unlike file sharing , the resources themselves aren't shared, merely bookmarks that reference them. Descriptions may be added to these bookmarks in the form of metadata , so that other users may understand the content of the resource without first needing to download it for themselves. Such descriptions may be free text comments, votes in favor of or against its quality, or tags that collectively or collaboratively become a folksonomy . Folksonomy is also called social tagging , "the process by which many users add metadata in the form of keywords to shared content". [1] Most social bookmark services encourage users to organize their bookmarks with informal tags instead of the traditional browser-based system of folders, although some services feature categories/folders or a combination of folders and tags. They also enable viewing bookmarks associated with a chosen tag, and include information about the number of users who have bookmarked them. Some social bookmarking services also draw inferences from the relationship of tags to create clusters of tags or bookmarks. Tags allow users to organize content they create as well. Tags on blog posts facilitate search engines finding content.
  • Today, people are producing all sorts of content – from blog posts to video, to slide shows, to podcasts. Traditional blogging tools like TypePad, Wordpress, and Blogger are low cost or free, but can involve different levels of complexity of design. Micro blogging sites like Jaiku, TypePad Micro, and Twitter, allow for the sharing of short posts on the fly. 12Seconds TV is kind of video version of a micro blog. SlideShare is a great way for folks to share presentations with others. Podcasting, of course, has become a popular way to get our information. … .When readers or viewers comment on the information distributed, it sets up an opportunity to interact with the creator of the content.       Finally, I wanted to mention Aardvark, which is the first “social earch engine” – givieng folks a way to find people, not web pages, that have specific information. a people social network set up to help folks get answers to questions they might not get answered on other search engines                  
  • Virtually everything that’s part of your life came about as a result of relationships… … even “introverts” staying in to read on a Friday night have a relationship with the author. Still, virtually all of us benefit from ongoing interactions with others, be they face-to-face, on the phone, or on line! Whatever you want in your life there is a BIG chance you will have or need to forge relationships to get it…
  • Figuring out what you want can sometimes take lots of introspection. One way to approach your goals is to plan your life and career in terms of the following (from Laurence Boldt, Zen and the Art of Making a Living ): Integrity: Who am I? Service: Who do I want to serve/work with? Enjoyment: What do I most love to do? Excellence: What will I devote myself to ? You may also choose to do a more extentive process of discovering, communicating, and living your personal brand.
  • >>>>>Have inserted Networking Naturally principles here, but need to have Carol review From Walter’s post on Trust Agents Using the Web to Build Influence, Improve Reputation, and Earn Trust: Trust Agents, six constellations of behaviors: Make Your Own Game. Trust agents are typically "gate jumpers" or "hackers" who are able to find ways be original and to stand out. One of Us. They are able to relate to a specific community that comes to see them as belonging, and therefore more credible.  Personal Branding Telesummit example
 Get to know the whole cow Put yourself in the other cow’s hooves Listen for the mooing The Archimedes Effect . They know how to leverage relationships and resources to expand opportunities and influence. 
 Moo about where the grass is Agent Zero. They are typically at the center of wide and powerful networks, and often use their influence to help others connect. 
 Cows are every where Be a cow among cows Human Artist. Trust agents have polished interpersonal skills and understand people; they know how to work well with, and empower others. 
 Be a cow among cows Be an upstanding cow Build Armies. They also know how to bring people together to accomplish more than they could possibly do alone. Be a cow among cows Supplemental: More from my post: In that interview, I also noted that increasingly success will not be based on one-way communications about one’s brand, but two-way conversations inside communities of shared interest, i.e., brand communities  – both online and in person-to-person situations. Fortunately, many of the behaviors that Brogan and Smith describe are consistent with what we typically recommend for extracting, expressing, and exuding one’s brand. Yet, it’s clear that building trust requires ongoing engagement. So much so that it seems to me that having a clear brand with solid messages is baseline. Taking steps to establish your reputation as a trust agent takes you to the next level. This all applies to job seeking, as well as what people do to build relationships in their professional communities.
  • Your people get you in a a wayothers don’t Find your people! That is the specific group of people for whom you’re relevant, or in Brogan and Smith’s terms who will see you as “one of us.” This idea has taken on more momentum over the past few years… with the idea of Tribes becoming a way of expressing this. In fact, Seth Godin, business thought leader and author (marketing) has written develped this idea in a neat little book called Tribes: We Need You to Lead Us . Key points from publisher’s review at Amazon: A tribe is a group of people connected to each other, to a leader and to an idea. Often assemble a movement of similarly minded individuals and get the tribe excited by a new product, service or message, often via the Internet. This is what Brogan and Smith call building armies. Tribes can be within or outside a corporation, and almost everyone can be a leader; most are kept from realizing their potential by fear of criticism and fear of being wrong. Change, according to this is “the way of the future and good, and often made…[not by] … asking permission, [but] …by asking forgiveness, later.” So, BIG note of caution…
  • Your people get you in a a wayothers don’t Find your people! That is the specific group of people for whom you’re relevant, or in Brogan and Smith’s terms who will see you as “one of us.” This idea has taken on more momentum over the past few years… with the idea of Tribes becoming a way of expressing this. In fact, Seth Godin, business thought leader and author (marketing) has written develped this idea in a neat little book called Tribes: We Need You to Lead Us . Key points from publisher’s review at Amazon: A tribe is a group of people connected to each other, to a leader and to an idea. Often assemble a movement of similarly minded individuals and get the tribe excited by a new product, service or message, often via the Internet. This is what Brogan and Smith call building armies. Tribes can be within or outside a corporation, and almost everyone can be a leader; most are kept from realizing their potential by fear of criticism and fear of being wrong. Change, according to this is “the way of the future and good, and often made…[not by] … asking permission, [but] …by asking forgiveness, later.” So, BIG note of caution…
  • Whey you set out to use online social media for networking, your mission is…
  • … and remember…whatever online tools you use, your aim is to make social connections…
  • … and remember…whatever online tools you use, your aim is to make social connections…
  • Let’s focus on being social on just a few sites…. … and let’s leave Twitter for last…
  • So, what can you do on these sites? Create a profile: Your profile let’s others in your network/community know what you’re about – from professional experience to leisure pursuits. It pays to have personal clarity before you create a profile, as this will help people connect with you on the basis of things that most matter to you. Build our community / network: On LinkedIn and Facebook you get to decide who is in your community/network> Often this will be based on, or start with, people you already know professionally. You will grow your network as you meet and come to know more people. On private online communities, you will be limited to connecting only with people already in the community – but you will already have shared interests (e.g., on Networking Naturally, members want to enhance their networking skills). Communicate: Online communities give you an additional way to communicate, including private messages and public commentary or status updates. Clearly one-to-one communication is a relationship builder; and public status updates often provide an opportunity to get to know others and communicate as well. As well you can participate in group discussions and share photos and videos – all tools that help us share our lives with each other both professionally and personally. Access information: These sites provide you opportunities to access information as well. For example, folks on LinkedIn participating in LI Answers provide information and points of view on a wide range of topics; also, via LI Applications, they share everything from blog posts, to slideshares, to Twitter Tweets. This is also true of Facebook, which includes ability to post videos. Private Pose or answer questions: Again, you can generate interaction by asking your own questions. On LI with Answers, but also on other sites with status updates and in come cases, survey tools. Broadcast information: If you run your blog feed into an online community, or post a link to an external website, you are broadcasting. If people comment on your links and posted links, you are conversing – and building relationships, albeit with one small interaction at a time (just like real life!) . Participate in groups and activities: Groups on LI allow for a variety of sharing around common interests, and on Facebook you can participate in a wide variety of group discussions or sign up for teleseminars. And as you know, the Networking Naturally community sponsors regular calls for members. So, what’s the value of all these tools? The build awareness of others and allow interactions that lead to relationships. Interacting with people online, even in very small doses, is fundamental to building relationships. In fact, it can accelerate forming relationships – a point made in Clive Thompson’s excellent NYT Magazine article, Brave New World of Digital Intimacy , here: http://www.nytimes.com/2008/09/07/magazine/07awareness-t.html
  • So, what can you do on these sites? Create a profile: Your profile let’s others in your network/community know what you’re about – from professional experience to leisure pursuits. It pays to have personal clarity before you create a profile, as this will help people connect with you on the basis of things that most matter to you.
  • So, what can you do on these sites? Build your community / network: On LinkedIn and Facebook you get to decide who is in your community/network> Often this will be based on, or start with, people you already know professionally. You will grow your network as you meet and come to know more people. On private online communities, you will be limited to connecting only with people already in the community – but you will already have shared interests (e.g., on Networking Naturally, members want to enhance their networking skills).
  • So, what can you do on these sites? Communicate: Online communities give you an additional way to communicate, including private messages and public commentary or status updates. Clearly one-to-one communication is a relationship builder; and public status updates often provide an opportunity to get to know others and communicate as well. As well you can participate in group discussions and share photos and videos – all tools that help us share our lives with each other both professionally and personally.
  • So, what can you do on these sites? Access information: These sites provide you opportunities to access information as well. For example, folks on LinkedIn participating in LI Answers provide information and points of view on a wide range of topics; also, via LI Applications, they share everything from blog posts, to slideshares, to Twitter Tweets. This is also true of Facebook, which includes ability to post videos. Private
  • So, what can you do on these sites? Pose or answer questions: Again, you can generate interaction by asking your own questions. On LI with Answers, but also on other sites with status updates and in come cases, survey tools.
  • So, what can you do on these sites? Broadcast information: If you run your blog feed into an online community, or post a link to an external website, you are broadcasting. If people comment on your links and posted links, you are conversing – and building relationships, albeit with one small interaction at a time (just like real life!) .
  • So, what can you do on these sites? Participate in groups and activities: Groups on LI allow for a variety of sharing around common interests, and on Facebook you can participate in a wide variety of group discussions or sign up for teleseminars. And as you know, the Networking Naturally community sponsors regular calls for members. So, what’s the value of all these tools? The build awareness of others and allow interactions that lead to relationships. Interacting with people online, even in very small doses, is fundamental to building relationships. In fact, it can accelerate forming relationships – a point made in Clive Thompson’s excellent NYT Magazine article, Brave New World of Digital Intimacy , here: http://www.nytimes.com/2008/09/07/magazine/07awareness-t.html
  • Twitter’s different! It has, for a long time, had a bit of a reputation as a way to send out a continual stream of self-centered updates, like …well, having lunch….but twitter is not just about lunch any more.
  • • Create a profile: Twitter allows you to put in a short bio, though you can provide a link to an external website where[people can learn more about you. • Build your community / network: On Twitter, you can choose to subscribe to the updates of people who are already part of your community/network. However, since you are essentially delivering a live, public feed, people who find you can subscribe (or follow) you and see your updates. You can always block them, but you mostly will want to have followers –especially ones who share common interests. • Communicate: Interacting with people you know, in the public timeline (usually via reply that starts with an @ symbol) or privately via a Direct Message) • Access information: Sometimes an individual tweet or a series of tweets can provide some useful information or perspective. More often you will access information via links – to blog posts or other web locations - that others provide. You may also use Twitter dedicate search engines like http://search.twitter.com • Pose or answer questions: I n their communications, people do pose or answer questions in the public timeline or via Direct Message. As well, there are tools for directing folks to external survey sites.   • Broadcast information: Essentially, your tweets in the public time line, as well as links to information you provide, are a way of broacasting. • Participate in groups and activities: With twitter perhaps the closest thing to participation are live tweeting from conferences or other group activites – generally signaled by a phrase or letters preceded by a “hashtag.” Finally, people on twitter at a conference or in a specific community can meet face-to-face at something called “teetups.” How you go about doing all of this on Twitter will be the subject of the next part of this series…so, stay tuned!
  • >>>>This could be the summary slide for the first segment So, what’s the value of all these tools? The build awareness of others and allow interactions that lead to relationships. Interacting with people online, even in very small doses, is fundamental to building relationships. In fact, it can accelerate forming relationships – a point made in Clive Thompson’s excellent NYT Magazine article, Brave New World of Digital Intimacy , here: http://www.nytimes.com/2008/09/07/magazine/07awareness-t.html
  • See you, again soon!

Networking And Social Media  Part 1 Networking And Social Media Part 1 Presentation Transcript

  • Networking with Social Media The Power of Belonging Walter Akana, January 2010
  • When you first ventured into the social world, it was just you…. … well, you & … your stuff …
  • … then you discovered there were … … other people!!
  • … you had concerns about fitting in …
  • … and sometimes…you found it … … just a little too much to handle!
  • Then you connected to people with like interests … … and began to make friends …
  • … your confidence grew …and soon… … you earned visibility … for your special talents!
  • … and found you belonged to a community …
  • Online communities work much the same way… … you , your stuff , and maybe a friend or two in a safe place … … like here:
  •  
  • Participating in the Groundswell: Winning in a World Transformed by Social Technologies Charlene Li & Josh Bernoff
    • Wikis and open source
    Participating in the Groundswell…
    • RSS and widgets
    Participating in the Groundswell…
    • Forums, ratings, and reviews
    Participating in the Groundswell…
    • Content organizing and tags
    Participating in the Groundswell…
  • Participating in the Groundswell…
    • Blogs, user-generated content, & podcasts
    • Social networks and virtual worlds
    Participating in the Groundswell…
  • Yeah, but why bother?
  • Yeah, but why bother?
  • So How To Start? Get Clear… … Trusted… … Belong…
  • Getting Clear What do I want? What do I offer? Who needs to know?
  • Getting Trusted Become A “Trust Agent”
  • Characterisics of a “Trust Agent” Make Your Own Game One of Us Archimedes Agent Zero Human Artist Build Armies
  • Getting Accepted
  • Getting Accepted
  • Using Social Media: Your mission, should you choose to accept it…
  • Find & Engage…
  • Find & Engage…
  • … and remember, the idea is to be…
  • … and remember, the idea is to be…
  • Let’s focus on being social… … on just a few sites…
  • So, What can you Do on these sites?
  • Create a Profile…
  • Build your Community / network
  • Communicate
  • Access Information
  •  
  • Broadcast Information
  • Participate in groups & activities
  • So, okay…what about…
    • Profile
    • Participate in groups& activities
    • Build your community / network
    • Communicate
    • Access information
    • Pose / answer questions
    • Broadcast information
    # @ / DM
  •  
  • So, what have we learned so far?
    • Venturing into the social world online is a little like your first social experiences;
    • Social web has a multiple ways to become visible, credible, and engaged;
    • Relationships with “your people” is a big reason for using social media;
    • Three keys to getting started.
  • Questions or Comments? Contact Walter at [email_address]