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Selling UX in Your Organization at Cleveland World Usability Day (WUD)
Selling UX in Your Organization at Cleveland World Usability Day (WUD)
Selling UX in Your Organization at Cleveland World Usability Day (WUD)
Selling UX in Your Organization at Cleveland World Usability Day (WUD)
Selling UX in Your Organization at Cleveland World Usability Day (WUD)
Selling UX in Your Organization at Cleveland World Usability Day (WUD)
Selling UX in Your Organization at Cleveland World Usability Day (WUD)
Selling UX in Your Organization at Cleveland World Usability Day (WUD)
Selling UX in Your Organization at Cleveland World Usability Day (WUD)
Selling UX in Your Organization at Cleveland World Usability Day (WUD)
Selling UX in Your Organization at Cleveland World Usability Day (WUD)
Selling UX in Your Organization at Cleveland World Usability Day (WUD)
Selling UX in Your Organization at Cleveland World Usability Day (WUD)
Selling UX in Your Organization at Cleveland World Usability Day (WUD)
Selling UX in Your Organization at Cleveland World Usability Day (WUD)
Selling UX in Your Organization at Cleveland World Usability Day (WUD)
Selling UX in Your Organization at Cleveland World Usability Day (WUD)
Selling UX in Your Organization at Cleveland World Usability Day (WUD)
Selling UX in Your Organization at Cleveland World Usability Day (WUD)
Selling UX in Your Organization at Cleveland World Usability Day (WUD)
Selling UX in Your Organization at Cleveland World Usability Day (WUD)
Selling UX in Your Organization at Cleveland World Usability Day (WUD)
Selling UX in Your Organization at Cleveland World Usability Day (WUD)
Selling UX in Your Organization at Cleveland World Usability Day (WUD)
Selling UX in Your Organization at Cleveland World Usability Day (WUD)
Selling UX in Your Organization at Cleveland World Usability Day (WUD)
Selling UX in Your Organization at Cleveland World Usability Day (WUD)
Selling UX in Your Organization at Cleveland World Usability Day (WUD)
Selling UX in Your Organization at Cleveland World Usability Day (WUD)
Selling UX in Your Organization at Cleveland World Usability Day (WUD)
Selling UX in Your Organization at Cleveland World Usability Day (WUD)
Selling UX in Your Organization at Cleveland World Usability Day (WUD)
Selling UX in Your Organization at Cleveland World Usability Day (WUD)
Selling UX in Your Organization at Cleveland World Usability Day (WUD)
Selling UX in Your Organization at Cleveland World Usability Day (WUD)
Selling UX in Your Organization at Cleveland World Usability Day (WUD)
Selling UX in Your Organization at Cleveland World Usability Day (WUD)
Selling UX in Your Organization at Cleveland World Usability Day (WUD)
Selling UX in Your Organization at Cleveland World Usability Day (WUD)
Selling UX in Your Organization at Cleveland World Usability Day (WUD)
Selling UX in Your Organization at Cleveland World Usability Day (WUD)
Selling UX in Your Organization at Cleveland World Usability Day (WUD)
Selling UX in Your Organization at Cleveland World Usability Day (WUD)
Selling UX in Your Organization at Cleveland World Usability Day (WUD)
Selling UX in Your Organization at Cleveland World Usability Day (WUD)
Selling UX in Your Organization at Cleveland World Usability Day (WUD)
Selling UX in Your Organization at Cleveland World Usability Day (WUD)
Selling UX in Your Organization at Cleveland World Usability Day (WUD)
Selling UX in Your Organization at Cleveland World Usability Day (WUD)
Selling UX in Your Organization at Cleveland World Usability Day (WUD)
Selling UX in Your Organization at Cleveland World Usability Day (WUD)
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Selling UX in Your Organization at Cleveland World Usability Day (WUD)

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We know the benefits of User Experience (UX) work include saving time and effort, and potentially increasing profits. How do you persuade the business to integrate (more) UX activities into the …

We know the benefits of User Experience (UX) work include saving time and effort, and potentially increasing profits. How do you persuade the business to integrate (more) UX activities into the process? How do you approach difficult questions about budget, timeline and other major issues?

This presentation gives you the facts to back up your convictions. Carol provides clear and compelling responses to tough questions about UX and usability methods. You’ll leave with facts about the Return on Investment (ROI) of UX, how to respond to UX skeptics, and how to turn your entire team into UX advocates.

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  • Takes too longCosts too muchYou can’t talk to our CustomersToo much liabilityWhat if they don’t like it?What if something happens to their information?We don’t need that – we know our usersWhat is the ROI of this anyway?
  • Transcript

    • 1. Cleveland UXPA World Usability Day 2013 Presented by Carol Smith @carologic
    • 2.       Time Cost No access to users Liability Not needed Invisible Return on Investment (ROI)
    • 3. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/garryknight/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/garryknight/5542172347/sizes/l/in/photostream/
    • 4.  Help the team:  understand user’s point of view  identify new opportunities  prioritize content and solutions  design for user’s needs and behaviors  create new solutions
    • 5.   Facilitate Communication Decision Making:  Navigation  Features  Design
    • 6.  You may sell UX to:  Clients  Project/Product Managers  Developers  Designers  Managers  Executives
    • 7.  Explain how the choices you’ve made lead to a successful project. This isn’t magic, it’s math.  Show your work. Don’t hope someone “gets it,” and don’t blame them if they don’t — convince them. Mike Monteiro, Design Is a Job via http://uxdesign.smashingmagazine.com/2013/02/20/sell-design-solution-clients/
    • 8.  Focus on interest, not positions  Need to make a great experience  Benefits for user and organization  Savings of time, money, resources, effort, etc.  Watch your pronouns  We not them
    • 9. Want to Sell UX? Stop Talking UX! by Lis Hubert, UX Consultant at Independent on Sep 05, 2013. http://www.slideshare.net/lishubert/want-to-sell-ux-stop-talking-ux
    • 10. http://www.flickr.com/photos/cuppini/3211910657/sizes/o/in/photostream/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/cuppini/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/
    • 11.   We are getting data from it. Why would we need anything more?
    • 12.   Compliment qualitative work Questions are an art-form  Multiple and un-intended meanings  Only get out of it what you ask about
    • 13.    Easy access Know the users Invested in this project
    • 14.  Know too much Ego, job, co-workers, etc. Not the intended user  OK for guerilla style testing  
    • 15. Why Change?
    • 16.  More than 83% of Internet users are likely to leave a Web site if…too many clicks to find what they’re looking for. -Arthur Andersen, 2001 Vague, Misleading Links are the Culprit Bias, Randolph, G. and Deborah J. Mayhew. Cost-Justifying Usability: An Update for the Internet Age. 2005.
    • 17. http://www.flickr.com/photos/librarycommission/2840794254/sizes/m/in/photostream/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/librarycommission/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/
    • 18. User Research Ethnography • Observe actual process • Equity among participants • Find patterns of behavior
    • 19. http://www.flickr.com/photos/kaptainkobold/5181464194/sizes/o/in/photostream/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/kaptainkobold/
    • 20.   Additional time and money Less costly to find and correct issues
    • 21.  How much is their time worth?  1 Hour of training?  1 Day of training?  1 Week of training?   Company was able to eliminate training and save $140,000 AT&T saved $2,500,000 in training expenses Bias & Mayhew, 1994 http://www.upassoc.org/usability_resources/usability_in_the_real_world/roi_of_usability.html
    • 22. Studies have shown that testing 5-6 representative users of each user type will reveal 80% of usability issues. http://www.useit.com/alertbox/20000319.html Jakob Nielsen’s Alertbox. Why You Only Need to Test with 5 Users. March 19, 2000.
    • 23.   This is about people Statistical significance is not feasible  Time  Cost  ROI would diminish entirely
    • 24.   Identify repetition After pattern is found, continuation:  Adds cost  Delays reporting  Low probability of many new findings
    • 25. Main Purpose # of Participants Convince skeptics (demonstration) 3 Find serious problems 9-12 Find all serious problems Unknown Find all problems Unknown Measure key parameters Molich, Rolf. A Critique of “How to Specify the Participant Group Size for Usability Studies: A Practitioner’s Guide” by Macefield. Journal of Usability Studies. Vol. 5, Issue 3, May 2010. pg. 124-128. >20
    • 26.  Know your primary user(s) and recruit carefully  Very specific user group - 5 works  Less well defined - more (8-15 or more)   There is controversy Study in 2001 was inconclusive due to study design (Spool and Schroeder)
    • 27.     Testing five users is not always enough Must be well recruited – not just anyone Smaller groups do not equate better findings Low test quality - size doesn’t matter "Results of usability tests depend considerably on the evaluator" - Jacobsen and Hertzum, 2001 Molich, Rolf. A Critique of “How to Specify the Participant Group Size for Usability Studies: A Practitioner’s Guide” by Macefield. Journal of Usability Studies. Vol. 5, Issue 3, May 2010. pg. 124-128.
    • 28. http://www.allbusiness.com/company-activities-management/financial/5670570-1.html All Business. Dated:Jan. 8, 2003
    • 29. Once a system is in development, correcting a problem costs 10 times as much as fixing the same problem in design. If the system had been released, it costs 100 times as much relative to fixing in design. -Gilb, 1988 -Bias, Randolph, G. and Deborah J. Mayhew. Cost-Justifying Usability: An Update for the Internet Age. 2005.
    • 30.    Access to users Access to data Before and after Small increments of time and effort X # of employees over time = Potentially huge savings in time and money
    • 31.    Small things can make a big difference $300,000,000 Button Provide right recommendations by observing and talking with the customers Spool, Jared. The $300 Million Button. January 14, 2009. http://www.uie.com/articles/three_hund_million_button/ Button: BD Create
    • 32.     Pay attention to who approaches you Look for your comrades May not be in your area of the organization Make time to chat with them  Share recent articles about UX  Invite to a UX event locally  Invite to join LinkedIn or other groups online
    • 33.     Use promotions Remind everyone of successes Provide templates for planning - include UX Provide highlights and/or reports that will help them sell UX
    • 34.  Identify C-level person  Get their support for a small study  Invite them to sessions  Make sure they see benefits gained  Remind them of success next time  Help them become a promoter
    • 35.   Centralized in a department Embedded in existing teams
    • 36.    Increase sales Save time and money Create happy customers
    • 37.    Sell more product Discover unmet needs Reduce:  Costs (support, training)  Need for updates and maintenance releases From A Practical Guide to Usability Testing by Joseph Dumas and Janice Redish, 1999. Page 18.
    • 38. “Customers are the only stakeholders who are not represented in design meetings. If it hurts users and will cause customers to leave? Silence. Unless you speak up. So do it.” -Jakob Nielsen Usability Evangelism: Beneficial or Land Grab? By Jakob Nielsen, Ph.D http://www.developer.nokia.com/Design/Usability_evangelism.xhtml
    • 39. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. Invite everyone to observe via remote observation Schedule testing at a regular time Promote availability of testing internally (Yammer) Network within organization and share what you do Present lunch sessions Invite staff to local UX events Share recommendations and successes widely Post information radiators in shared locations Hold a World Usability Day event next year! Invite everyone to observe UX sessions in-person
    • 40. They are depending on you!
    • 41. Twitter @carologic LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/caroljsmith Slides: slideshare.net/carologic UX Akron
    • 42. 50
    • 43.  Building Trust and Credibility: How To Sell Your UX Design Solution To Clients by Rian van der Merwe http://uxdesign.smashingmagazine.com/2013/02/20/sell-design-solution-clients/        Cost-Justifying Usability: An Update for the Internet Age, Randolph G. Bias and Deborah J. Mayhew The $300 Million Button by Jared Spool Jakob Nielsen’s Alertbox. Why You Only Need to Test with 5 Users. March 19, 2000. Measuring the User Experience by Bill Albert and Tom Tullis Usability Evangelism: Beneficial or Land Grab? by Jakob Nielsen, Ph.D http://www.upassoc.org/usability_resources/usability_in_the_real_world/roi_of_ usability.html Molich, Rolf. A Critique of “How to Specify the Participant Group Size for Usability Studies: A Practitioner’s Guide” by Macefield. Journal of Usability Studies. Vol. 5, Issue 3, May 2010. pg. 124-128.

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