Sem to go with rls 2

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  • Paraphrase This Information for the Participants:
    •Review the principles listed on this slide and tell the audience that these principles have developed over 20 years of field testing and research on the Enrichment Triad Model. Enrichment learning and teaching, a concept conceived by Joseph Renzulli, is based on the ideas of a small but influential number of philosophers, theorists, and researchers. The work of these theorists, coupled with Renzulli's research and program development activities, has given rise to the concept that he calls enrichment learning and teaching. He defines this concept in terms of the following four principles:
    •The ultimate goal of learning that is guided by these principles is to replace dependent and passive learning with independence and engaged learning.
  • ART
  • CIVICS/SOCIAL
  • ENGLISH
  • HISTORY
  • RESEARCH
  • SCIENCE
  • What is differentiation?
  • And it meets this challenge!
  • Sem to go with rls 2

    1. 1. The Schoolwide Enrichment Model Rigorous Challenge and Engagement for Everyone Caroline S. Cohen, Ph.D.
    2. 2. The Agenda for theThe Agenda for the Workshop:Workshop: 1. Introduction to the Schoolwide Enrichment Model 2. The Total Talent Portfolio 3. The Enrichment Triad Model 4. Differentiating for Diverse Learners 5. Curriculum Compacting 6. Enrichment Clusters
    3. 3. Do educators feel like this on a regular basis?
    4. 4. What Is a Model? I II Common Goals All roads lead to Rome… Unique Means …but there are many ways to get to Rome. Ideas (Theory Supported By Research) Engineering (Practice)
    5. 5. Theme: A rising tide lifts all ships… The main focus of The Schoolwide Enrichment Model is to apply the pedagogy of gifted education to total school improvement. All students, from struggling learners to our most advanced students do better in an atmosphere that values diversity among fellow students, and a broad range of learning options that are designed to promote high levels of achievement, creative productivity, motivation, and respect for the uniqueness of each student.
    6. 6. The National Research Center on the Gifted and Talented, 2004 University of Connecticut, 2131 Hillside Road Unit 3007, Storrs, CT 06269-3007 Student Goals q 6sbÌd`vdcqd`Ìshsfbg`qqdsfdvxbbdvv`sc`b`cdrhb `bghdydrdsw q 2sg`sbdchswÌhsvhbrtwhy`whtsetÌqd`Ìshsf q 6rËÌtydrdswvhsvdqechÌdbwdcqd`Ìshsfadg`yhtÌv q Edehsdrdswte`s`qƒ whb`qbÌhwhb`qbÌd`whyd`sc ËÌtaqdr vtqyhsfvphqqv q 2vb`q`wdcqdydqvtew`qdswcdydqtËrdsw
    7. 7. Will this be on the Test?
    8. 8. Regular Classroom Enrichment Learning and Teaching TYPE I GENERAL EXPLORATORY ACTIVITIES TYPE II GROUP TRAINNING ACTIVITIES TYPE III INDIVIDUAL SMALL GROUP INVESTIGATIONS OF REAL PROBLEMS Environment T he Schoolwide Enrichment Model Joseph S. Renzulli Sally M. Reis www.gifted.uconn.edu Service Delivery Components The Total Talent Portfolio Curriculum Modification Techniques School Structures The Regular Curriculum The Enrichment Clusters The Continuum of Special Services Organizational Components Resources • Identification Instruments • Curriculum Materials • Staff Development Training Materials • Evaluation Instruments
    9. 9. The Total Talent Portfolio Knowing our Students
    10. 10. “The more we know about a person, the better we can plan for them.” Dr. Joseph Renzulli, UCONN “How can I teach you unless I know you?” Dr. Carol Tomlinson, University of Virginia How can we gather information about our students? Use a Total Talent Portfolio/Learner Profile
    11. 11. Learner Profiles The first component of the Schoolwide Enrichment Model (SEM) is the Total Talent Portfolio (TTP). The TTP helps teachers gather information about students’ strengths, abilities, interests, learning styles, and expression styles, and helps make decisions about appropriate follow- up activities.University of Connecticut, 2131 Hillside Road Unit 3007, Storrs The National Research Center on the Gifted and Talented, 2004, CT 06269-3007
    12. 12. The Total Talent Portfolio/ Learner Profile Definition The Total Talent Portfolio is a vehicle for gathering and recording information systematically about students’ abilities, interests, learning styles, and expression styles. The Schoolwide Enrichment Model, Drs. Joseph Renzulli Sally Reis, UCONN
    13. 13. The Total Talent Portfolio/ Learner Profile Theme • What are the best things we know and can record about the very best aspects of this student’s work? • What are the very best things we can do to capitalize on this information? See also: Burns, D. E. (1993). Pathways to Investigative Skills. Mansfield Center, CT: Creative Learning Press. McGreevey, A. (1982). My Book of Things and Stuff: An Interest Questionnaire for Young Children. Mansfield Center, CT: Creative Learning Press. Renzulli, J. S. (1977). The Interest-A-Lyzer. Mansfield Center, CT: Creative Learning Press. Renzulli, J. S., Hebert, T. P., Sorenson, M. S. (1994). Secondary Interest-A-Lyzer. Mansfield Center, CT: Creative Learning Press. The Schoolwide Enrichment Model, Drs. Joseph Renzulli Sally Reis, UCONN
    14. 14. SEM Lecture, Dr. Joseph Renzulli, UCONN, 2005
    15. 15. FACTORS OF THE “LEARNI NG STYLES I NVENTORY” 1. Proj ect s 2. Dr ill Recit at ion 3. Peer Teaching 4. Discussion 5. Teaching Games 6. I ndependent St udy 7. Programmed I nst r uct ion 8. Lect ure 9. Simulat ion
    16. 16. EXPRESSI ON STYLE FACTORS 1. Writ t en Pr oduct s 2. Or al Pr oduct s 3. Ar t ist ic Product s 4. Comput er Technology 5. Audio/ Visual Technology 6. Commercial Pr oduct s 7. Service Product s 8. Dr amat izat ion Product s 9. Manipulat ive Pr oduct s 10. Musical Product s
    17. 17. “Turn and Talk” 1. How, in your planning and teaching, could you use the Total Talent Portfolio or the Profiler? 2. How would you introduce and implement the Total Talent Portfolio or the Profiler in your school?
    18. 18. Enrichment Learning and Teaching The principles of enrichment learning and teaching are: Each learner is unique. Learning is more effective when students enjoy what they are doing. Learning is more meaningful when content and process are learned within the context of a real problem. Learning can be enhanced through informal instruction that uses applications of students' constructed knowledge and skills. University of Connecticut, 2131 Hillside Road Unit 3007, Storrs The National Research Center on the Gifted and Talented, 2004, CT 06269-3007
    19. 19. Environment in GeneralRegular Classroom TYPE I GENERAL EXPLORATORY ACTIVITIES TYPE II GROUP TRAINING ACTIVITIES TYPE III INDIVIDUAL SMALL GROUP INVESTIGATIONS OF REAL PROBLEMS
    20. 20. TYPE I GENERAL EXPLORATORY ACTIVITIES
    21. 21. The National Research Center on the Gifted and Talented, 2004 University of Connecticut, 2131 Hillside Road Unit 3007, Storrs, CT 06269-3007 Type I Enrichment Experiences and activities that are purposefully designed to expose students to a wide variety of topics, issues, and activities not ordinarily covered in the regular curriculum.
    22. 22. The National Research Center on the Gifted and Talented, 2004 University of Connecticut, 2131 Hillside Road Unit 3007, Storrs, CT 06269-3007 Type I Enrichment Resource Persons speakers, mini-courses, demonstrations, artistic performances, panel discussions Media/Technology/Library Resources films, slides, audio, videotapes, television, books, newspapers/magazines, Internet, World Wide Web Other field trips, displays, museum or nature center programs
    23. 23. TYPE II GROUP TRAINING ACTIVITIES
    24. 24. The National Research Center on the Gifted and Talented, 2004 University of Connecticut, 2131 Hillside Road Unit 3007, Storrs, CT 06269-3007 Type II Enrichment The use of instructional methods and materials that are purposefully designed to promote the development of thinking skills and foster the use of authentic, investigative methods in students.
    25. 25. The National Research Center on the Gifted and Talented, 2004 University of Connecticut, 2131 Hillside Road Unit 3007, Storrs, CT 06269-3007 Whole and Small Group Type II Enrichment q 0Ìd`whydGghsphsfFphqqv q 0Ìd`whydCÌtaqdrFtqyhsf`sc 1dbhvhts@`phsf q 0Ìhwhb`q`sc9tfhb`qGghsphsf q eedbwhydFphqqv 0tfshwhyd`sc eedbwhydGÌ`hshsf cy`sbdcEdvd`ÌbgFphqqv `scEdedÌdsbd@`wdÌh`qv q CÌdË`Ì`whtsetÌGƒ Ëd6666sydvwhf`whtsv q 9haÌ`̃ Fphqqv q 0trrxshwƒ EdvtxÌbdv q 2qdbwÌtshbEdvd`Ìbg 9d`Ìshsf5t wt9d`ÌsFphqqv q 9hvwdshsfBavdÌyhsf`scCdÌbdhyhsfFphqqv q Atwdw`phsf`scBxwqhshsf q 6swdÌyhd v`scFxÌydƒ v q s`qƒ „hsf`scBÌf`sh„hsf1`w` q Ihvx`q0trrxshb`whts q BÌ`q0trrxshb`whts q P Ìhwwds0trrxshb`whts 0trrxshb`whtsFphqqv
    26. 26. Methodological Type IIs How to: • use a microscope • date archaeological artifacts • develop photographic film • use a computer for drafting • make an animated movie • create newsletters • write for television • think like a historian • make boomerangs • start a business • forecast the weather • classify rocks minerals • prepare a portfolio
    27. 27. Environment in GeneralRegular Classroom TYPE III INDIVIDUAL SMALL GROUP INVESTIGATIONS OF REAL PROBLEMS
    28. 28. The National Research Center on the Gifted and Talented, 2004 University of Connecticut, 2131 Hillside Road Unit 3007, Storrs, CT 06269-3007 Type III Enrichment Investigative activities and artistic productions in which the learner assumes the role of a first- hand inquirer and a practicing professional.
    29. 29. SEM Lecture, Dr. Joseph Renzulli, UCONN, 2005
    30. 30. SEM Lecture, Dr. Joseph Renzulli, UCONN, 2005
    31. 31. SEM Lecture, Dr. Joseph Renzulli, UCONN, 2005
    32. 32. University of Connecticut, 2131 Hillside Road Unit 3007, Storrs The National Research Center on the Gifted and Talented, 2004, CT 06269-3007
    33. 33. Unit: Nutrition Key Concepts: #1: Nutritional eating means that we include foods from the 5 major food groups in our daily food selection: the bread, cereal, rice, and pasta group; the vegetable group; the fruit group; the milk, yogurt, and cheese group; and the meat, poultry, fish, dry beans, eggs, and nuts group. #2: For healthy, balanced eating, we should eat the recommended number of servings from each food group, and use fats and oils sparingly. #3: People who don’t eat a balanced diet may lack energy and may be more likely to have weight problems or get sick. #4: Junk food is high in calories and low in nutrients, so it doesn’t fuel the body as well as nutritional foods. When people eat a balanced diet, they crave less junk food. #5: Exercise has long lasting, beneficial effects on the body, regardless of the degree to which one makes wise decisions about nutrition. Source: Teaching Gifted Kids in the Regular Classroom – Strategies and Techniques Every Teacher Can Use to Meet the Academic Needs of the Gifted and Talented by Susan Winebrenner Products Based on Expression Style Inventory Written Oral Artistic Computer Audio/Visual Commercial Service Dramatization Manipulative Musical Source: My Way … An Expression Style Inventory, K.E. Kettle, J.S. Renzulli, M. G. Rizza, UCONN
    34. 34. Products Based on Expression Style Inventory Written Oral Artistic Computer Audio/Visual Commercial Service Dramatization Manipulative Musical Source: My Way … An Expression Style Inventory, K.E. Kettle, J.S. Renzulli, M. G. Rizza, UCONN
    35. 35. WHALE TIC-TAC-TOE 1. Draw a poster picture to show the two major groups of whales 2. Demonstrate through an experiment how whales eat food. 3. Pretend the blue whale will change in the next 10 years. Draw the new whale on mural paper. 4. Teach a lesson about how whales differ from fish. Share this information on a chart paper. 5. Read 2 whale stories. Talk about how they are alike and how they are different. Write 5 whale facts on paper. 6. Write a story or a journal about the life of a blue whale. 7. Present reasons for why or why not whales are called the “gentle giants of the sea.” 8. Act Out something you have learned about the blue whale. Make a stick puppet for your skit. 9. Build a home for your whale. Use clay for the whale and Make a diorama to show The ocean. I choose activities #________________#_________________,#________________ I will complete #5 and I will read_______________________________________________and _______________________________________________________________. Name:___________________________________________Date:______________________ Source: Susan Winebrenner Susan Griggs
    36. 36. Colonial America: A Living Museum through the 8 Multiple Intelligences 1. Body Smart Reenact a colonial legend or life activity through a puppet show, dance, mime or demonstration Use your research to make this authentic presentation. 2. People Smart To show how Colonial Americans interacted with one another, you can role play, simulate, or engage in an activity that reflects the Colonial times. 3. Me Smart Relive the day in the life of a Colonial person through journal writing. Record your character’s thoughts and feelings. You can draw a self-portrait if you like. 4. Math Smart Show Colonial children at play with games, hobbies or quilting, - OR - Share some favorite Colonial recipes through measuring authentic ingredients. Every student will research 20 notefacts on selected topics and become an “expert” about certain areas of Colonial America. Two books will be required for the research. Students will group together by interests to perform a Colonial America “Living Museum”. 6. Nature Smart To show a colonist’s love of nature, and your own, you can plant, show simple farming and landscaping techniques used during this time period. 7. Word Smart How did the Colonial children learn to read and write? Act out the lessons in a Colonial school – create a hornbook. 8. Music Smart Create a sound poem, a dance, a rhyme from the Colonial times – OR – take a current song and adapt it to reflect this history. 5. Art Smart To show the art and culture of the Colonial Period, you can draw, build a small structure: do needlework or quilt to reflect the times. Directions: Each of you will research a minimum of 20 note facts of the Colonial Times of American History. You will select an area of interest and a strength area you may have: Me Smart, etc. Using your research as your guide, you will script and present “A Living Museum” of the time period. Costumes, backdrop and props will be necessary to complete your presentation. Ideas taken from Howard Gardner’s Multiple Intelligences Revised 6/98 by Susan S. Griggs and Louise Misiorek
    37. 37. The National Research Center on the Gifted and Talented, 2004 University of Connecticut, 2131 Hillside Road Unit 3007, Storrs, CT 06269-3007 The Evolution of a Type III: Liza, Grade 3 Type I Activities: 1. Read Little House on the Prairie by Laura Ingalls Wilder. 2. Saw biographical video on Laura Ingalls Wilder (LIW). Type II Activities: 1. Read 6 other fictional books by Laura Ingalls Wilder and 5 nonfiction books. 2. Wrote to LIW Organizations for information. 3. Read primary source materials (letters by LIW). 4. Did research on board game construction. Type III Product: Original Board Game based on the life of Laura Ingalls Wilder
    38. 38. The National Research Center on the Gifted and Talented, 2004 University of Connecticut, 2131 Hillside Road Unit 3007, Storrs, CT 06269-3007 Applying Triad to an Interdisciplinary Unit on Immigration q GÌ`cdattpv q 6swdÌdvwbdswd́ hwg`Ìwhe`bwv eÌtr twgdÌbtxswÌhdvvtqcqdwwdÌv ËgtwtfÌ`Ëgvu q 1hvËq`ƒ te`whrdqhsdts hrrhfÌ`whtsË`wwdÌsv q CÌdvdswdÌv`scvËd`pdÌveÌtr 6rrhfÌ`whtsBeehbd`scwgtvd  gthrrhfÌ`wdceÌtr twgdÌ btxswÌhdv q Ihcdtts2qqhv6vq`sc q @tyhdvcd`qhsf hwg hrrhfÌ`whts q BÌ`qghvwt̃ hswdÌyhd hsf wdbgshuxdv q 1dbhvhtsr`phsfbgttvhsf wtËhbvetÌetqqt xËvwxcƒ q HvhsfdqdbwÌtshbrdch`wtf`wgdÌ hsetÌr`whts q PÌhwhsfsd vË`ËdÌ`Ìwhbqdv q 1thsffdsd`qtfhb`qÌdvd`Ìbg xvhsf¢5t Gt¢attpvvdf 5t wtGÌ`bdRtxÌ3`rhqƒ GÌdd v%#!uaƒ GgdrdÌhb`s 4dsd`qtfhb`qEdvd`Ìbg6svwhwxwdu Gƒ Ëd6bwhyhwhdv Gƒ Ëd66GÌ`hshsf
    39. 39. ENRICHMENT TRIAD WORKSHEET TOPIC: TYPE 1 TYPE II TYPE III
    40. 40. CURRI CULUM COMPACTI NG Appropriat e Cont ent And Pacing For Each St udent
    41. 41. The success of education depends on adapting teaching to individual differences among learners. Yuezheng, in 4th century B. C. Chinese treatise, Xue Ji
    42. 42. Al l s t udent s need t o work hard. Al l s t udent s need t o have an educat i on t hat f i t s . AlaneStarko Teachi ng wel l i s about t eachi ng everyone wel l . CarolAnnTomlinson
    43. 43. As educat ors , our goal f or each s t udent mus t i ncl ude cont i nuous academi c f orward mot i on. SallyDobyns Equal t reat ment of unequal s i s t he mos t unequal t reat ment of al l . U.S. DepartmentofEducation
    44. 44. The biggest mistake of past centuries in teaching has been to treat all children as if they were variants of the same individual and thus to feel justified in teaching them all the same subjects in the same way. –Howard Gardner
    45. 45. When a teacher tries to teach something to the entire class at the same time, “chances are, one-third of the kids already know it; one-third will get it; and the remaining third won’t. So two-thirds of the children are wasting their time.” Lillian Katz
    46. 46. What is Differentiation? Matching challenging curriculum with a student’s interests, abilities, learning styles, and expression styles through a variety of teaching practices. CURRICULUM Varied Teaching Practices
    47. 47. First grade would be all right if it weren't for the 11 sequels.
    48. 48. When once the child has learned that four and two are six, a thousand repetitions will give him no new information, and it is a waste of time to keep him employed in that manner. J.M. Greenwood Principles of Education Practically Applied, 1888
    49. 49. Compacting • Assesses what a student knows and what the student still needs to master • Eliminates content that is already known • Plans time to be spent in enriched or accelerated study
    50. 50. Goals of Compacting • Create a challenging learning environment in the classroom and the enrichment program for all children! • Define objectives and guarantee proficiency in basic curriculum. • Find time for alternative learning activities based on advanced content and individual student interest.
    51. 51. Approximately 40-50% of traditional classroom material could be eliminated for targeted students.
    52. 52. When teachers eliminated as much as 50% of the curriculum, no differences were found between treatment and control groups in most content areas. In fact, students whose curriculum was compacted scored higher than control group students in some areas.
    53. 53. Individual Educational Programming Guide—The Compactor Name Age Teacher School Grade Parent(s) Individual C onference Dates and P ersons Participating in Plan ning of IEP Curriculum Areas to Be Considered for Compacting Procedures for Compacting Basic Materials Acceleration and/or Enrichment Activities
    54. 54. What are the student behaviors that suggest compacting? How will the student’s work be shared with an audience? “Change It.” What learning activities are needed to teach the material not previously mastered? (streamlined instruction) “Prove It.” How will you use the student’s learner profile? What will be the creative/productive options that will be used as replacement activities? How will you document prior or rapid mastery? (pre-testing) What material is to be eliminated? What content does s/he already know about this theme or unit? Step 3: Creative What alternate activities will be planned for enrichment and/or acceleration? Individual or small group? Step 2: Mechanical What learning activities are needed to teach and assess the regular curriculum? Step 1: Factual What are the objectives? What material will be taught? Curriculum Compacting Adapted from: It’s About Time : Inservice Strategies for Curriculum Compacting by Alane J. Starko. Mansfield Center, CT: Creative Learning Press, 1986. “Name It.”
    55. 55. Student Behaviors Suggesting that Compacting May Be Necessary
    56. 56. • Consistently finishes tasks quickly • Finishes reading assignments first • Appears bored during instruction time • Brings in outside reading material • Creates own puzzles, games, or diversions in class • Consistently daydreams
    57. 57. • Has consistently high performance in one or more academic areas • Tests scores consistently excellent • Asks questions that indicate advanced familiarity with material • Is sought after by other students for assistance
    58. 58. • Uses vocabulary and verbal expression advance of grade level • Expresses interest in pursuing alternate or advanced topics.
    59. 59. Compacting: “Quick and Dirty” Check • Is the student in the top reading group or reading at an advanced level? • Does he or she finish tasks quickly? • Do you think he or she would benefit from more challenging work?
    60. 60. The National Research Center on the Gifted and Talented, 2004 University of Connecticut, 2131 Hillside Road Unit 3007, Storrs, CT 06269 - 3007 Curriculum Compacting and Enrichment in Language Arts Student With Documented Language Arts Strengths— Nicole reads 3 grades above grade level Streamlining and Elimination of Regular Curriculum in Language Arts— Substitution of more advanced Language Arts work Type I—Exposure to various types of creative writing, reading advanced literary material, videotape of classic books made into movies, books on tape, television specials, and literary topics. Type II—Selected methodological training opportunities including a how-to book entitled Pursuing the Past(1984) by Provenzo, E. F., Jr., Provenzo, A. B., Zorn, P., Jr. Creative Learning Press, Mansfield Center, CT. Type III—Selection of an individual or small group Type III study such as the creation of a board game. Curriculum Procedure for Compacting The Compactor Form Accelerationand/orEnrichment Triad Curriculum Procedure for Compacting Acceleration and/or Enrichment The Compactor Form Triad
    61. 61. Upside, Downside, On Side of Curriculum Compacting   Upside What are the benefits of compacting? Downside What are my concerns associated with compacting? On side What have I already done related to compacting? Source: Differentiated Instructional Strategies in Practice, Training. Implementation, and Supervision. Gayle H. Gregory, 2003.
    62. 62. Enrichment Clusters Enrichment Opportunities for All Students
    63. 63. Suddenly I remembered why I had gone into teaching in the first place. I had forgotten and I didn’t even know I had forgotten. Then I remembered what I always thought teaching would be all about. Middle School Teacher in the Enrichment Cluster Research Project
    64. 64. Are nongraded groups of students who share common interests and come together during specially designated time blocks to pursue these interests. Enrichment Clusters Renzulli Reis
    65. 65. The National Research Center on the Gifted and Talented, 2004 University of Connecticut, 2131 Hillside Road Unit 3007, Storrs, CT 06269-3007 Small Group Opportunities— Enrichment Clusters Key Features of Enrichment Clusters in Your Classroom, Grade Level, or School Multi-age Interest-Based Product-Oriented Teacher as Facilitator and Participant
    66. 66. The National Research Center on the Gifted and Talented, 2004 University of Connecticut, 2131 Hillside Road Unit 3007, Storrs, CT 06269-3007 Cluster Titles and Descriptions q RtxsfxwgtÌvw4xhqc q CtdwwvP tÌpvgtË q 2‚ ËdÌhrdsw`qEtatwhbvGd`r q A`whydrdÌhb`s1`sbd6svwhwxwd q 0Ìd`whyd0`ÌwtfÌ`ËgdÌvwFtbhdwƒ q @`wgdr`whbv0trËdwhwhts9d`fxd q 0trËxwdÌ4Ì`Ëghbv1dvhfsGd`r q 2‚ ËdÌhrdsw`q4`rdvEdvd`ÌbgGd`r q 6svwhwxwdetÌwgdFwxcƒ te@xqwhbxqwxÌ`q EdbÌd`whts q 7xrËhswt7`„„
    67. 67. Regular Classroom Enrichment Learning and Teaching TYPE I GENERAL EXPLORATORY ACTIVITIES TYPE II GROUP TRAINNING ACTIVITIES TYPE III INDIVIDUAL SMALL GROUP INVESTIGATIONS OF REAL PROBLEMS Environment T he Schoolwide Enrichment Model Joseph S. Renzulli Sally M. Reis www.gifted.uconn.edu Service Delivery Components The Total Talent Portfolio Curriculum Modification Techniques School Structures The Regular Curriculum The Enrichment Clusters The Continuum of Special Services Organizational Components Resources • Identification Instruments • Curriculum Materials • Staff Development Training Materials • Evaluation Instruments
    68. 68. No C L B hild eft ored! …
    69. 69. Debriefing the Schoolwide Enrichment Model }What? So What? Now What? } } Summarizewhat you havelearned about theSchoolwide Enrichment Model. Arethereareasof thismodel that areof interest to you now? What istheimportanceof theSchoolwide Enrichment Model to school improvement? How can theSchoolwideEnrichment Model beconnected with your school’s/district’s goalsfor servicesto highly capablestudents? How can your own professional experiences beapplied to thismodel? What SchoolwideEnrichment Model servicedelivery components can you try when you return to your school? What stepswould you taketo implement thesecomponents? What problemswould you haveto overcome? What elsewould you liketo know about the SchoolwideEnrichment Model? TheThreePhasesof Debriefing: Dr. Joseph Renzulli, Dr. Sally Reis, SchoolwideEnrichment Model, University of Connecticut Revised 4/03 Susan S. Griggs, Talent Development Coordinator/Enrichment Specialist, Westerly, RI School District

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