Classroom Environmental Evaluation<br /><ul><li>Due Session 11 – April 7, 2011</li></ul>Introduction: This exercise has a ...
Classroom environmental evaluation
Classroom environmental evaluation
Classroom environmental evaluation
Classroom environmental evaluation
Classroom environmental evaluation
Classroom environmental evaluation
Classroom environmental evaluation
Classroom environmental evaluation
Classroom environmental evaluation
Classroom environmental evaluation
Classroom environmental evaluation
Classroom environmental evaluation
Classroom environmental evaluation
Classroom environmental evaluation
Classroom environmental evaluation
Classroom environmental evaluation
Classroom environmental evaluation
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Classroom environmental evaluation

421

Published on

Published in: Education, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
421
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
92
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Transcript of "Classroom environmental evaluation"

  1. 1. Classroom Environmental Evaluation<br /><ul><li>Due Session 11 – April 7, 2011</li></ul>Introduction: This exercise has a dual role: (1) it allows the classroom teacher to become aware of the importance and elements that makes a thriving literate classroom environment, and (2) it aids the classroom teacher in moving into a literacy evaluator. It is a self evaluating instrument created to give the learner a tool for which to examine and improve the literacy environment of the classroom. <br />The CEE evaluates the classroom in 17 categories. In using this instrument, the user will obtain immediate insight in the various categories and will be able to evaluate and assess the effectiveness of the current curriculum as well as the related materials and teaching tools in the classroom. The teacher in the role as a literacy evaluator will be able to gain valuable information to further adjust, develop, scaffold and create a better environment that exposes the students to literacy in its fullest and most outstanding form. <br />Computers/Electronics Texts:<br />This category includes any texts that are used through an electronic medium. When considering the types of <br />computers or electronics in the classroom, look for the quantity /variety, engaging qualities (language, design, <br />content), accessibility (display and organization), and the challenge level (decodability, predictability, and <br />vocabulary) of each. Consider how easily students might use the text. Consider, as well, the degree to which <br />the cultural and linguistic diversity of the texts reflects the student population.<br />Examples: Messaging systems (e-mail), Internet access ( for research), software programs (reading and <br />authoring programs), tests or test preparation, text files that are saved and accessed by students, books-on-<br />tape (listening centers), and news or information shows.<br />Rubric:Computer/Electronic Texts.Inadequate1 ptBasic3 ptsOutstanding5 ptsQuantity/Variety Books on tape but no computers are available in the classroom that is directly accessible to students. If there is a computer in the classroom it is not internet connected nor are there developmentally appropriate software programs for the students.Books on tape and at least one computer are available for students in the classroom.Additional computers are available outside the classroom for student use. Basic software programs are available and developmentally appropriate.At least three computers are available for use in the classroom and access to other computers outside the class is also available. The computers are connected to the internet. Multiple developmentally appropriate software programs are available to the students.Engaging Qualities (Language Design Content)Books on tape and computers are developmentally inappropriate to many of the student skill levels in the class. Poor design and limited content limit the usefulness of the computers in the literacy programBooks on tape and computers programs, though limited in numbers and variety, can be characterized as developmentally appropriate to a wide range of student skill levels and rich design, and content that is varied and motivating to the full range of developmental levels of the students in the class.Computer programs can be characterized as developmentally appropriate to a wide range of student skill levels and rich design, and content that is varied and motivating to the full range of developmental levels of the students in the class.Accessibility (Display, Organization)Access to computers is severely limited.Access is limited to students in terms of time as well as limited in terms of the use of particular programs.Computers and programs are available to students for use throughout the day for extended periods of time.Challenge Level (decodability, predictability, and vocabulary load)Programs, if available, are inappropriate to the skills and interests of students in the class.Software programs, limited in range, accommodate the breadth of skill levels and interests in the classroom.Software programs are of a wide range of challenge levels and accommodate the breadth of skill levels and interests in the classroom.<br />Category: Computers /Electronic Texts Rating: <br />Definition: This category includes any texts that are accessed and used through an electronic medium.<br />DescriptionComments:Quantity /Variety : Engaging Quantities(Language Design Content): Accessibility (Display, Organization): Challenge Level (decodability ,predictability, and vocabulary load)<br />Games /Puzzles/Manipulative<br />There are instructional materials designed for student use (often as independent or small group work).To be <br />considered in this category they must feature text prominently. This category may include both limited and <br />extended uses of text. (e.g. “scrabble” as limited text; “Monopoly” as extended text).These texts may be <br />constructed either locally or commercially. Look for the quality/variety, engaging qualities (language, design, <br />content) accessibility (display and organization), and the challenge level (decodability, predictability and <br />vocabulary) of each. Investigate developmental appropriateness of the texts for the students in class. Look <br />for local and commercial texts. Consider, as well, the degree to which the cultural and linguistic diversity <br />of the texts reflects the student’s population. Examples: Bingo, Clue, Word Sorts, Magnetic Poetry. <br />Rubric:Computer/Electronic TextsInadequate1 ptsBasic 3 ptsOutstanding5 ptsQuantity/VarietyFew if any games, puzzles manipulative are available to support instruction.A limited number of games/puzzles/manipulatives are present in the classroom to support instruction.A variety of games/puzzles/manipulatives (both limited and extended text types) are on display/available and are used to support the direct instruction of the teacher.Engaging Qualities (Language Design Content)Games/puzzles/manipulatives are not present in this classroom and if they are, their format limits their potential impact on student learning.The games/puzzles/manipulatives are available to the children and can be characterized as functional in design. The games/puzzles/manipulatives are available to the children and can be characterized by the nature of construction (both local and commercially prepared games are available). The content and presentation of the materials are rich, motivating, and developmentally appropriate for the children in the class.Accessibility (Display, Organization)The games/puzzles/ manipulatives are not in place, and if they are, are not available for the children to use on an independent basis. The games/puzzles/ manipulatives are available to the children in the class but are used on an irregular basis. The games/puzzles/ manipulatives are available to the children in the class and are used on a regular basis.Challenge Level (decodability, predictability, and vocabulary load)If games/ puzzles/ manipulatives are available, they are not accessible to many of the children (not developmentally appropriate).Games/ puzzles/ manipulatives are constructed with text that is accessible to most students in the class.Games/ puzzles/ manipulatives are constructed with text that is appropriate for the students in the class.<br />Category: Games/ Puzzles/ Manipulatives Rating: <br />Definition: These are instructional materials designed for student use (often as independent or small group work)<br />DescriptionComments:Quantity/Variety: Engaging Qualities (Language Design Content): Accessibility (Display, Organization): Challenge Level (decodability, predictability, and vocabulary load) <br />Instructional Aids Charts<br />These enlarged/public texts are used to support instruction. They may be commercial charts (e.g. story charts provided by basal publishers) or the teacher may locally develop them. Often these instructional aid charts are used as a visual aid to support direct instructions or minilessons. They may be written by the teacher or by the students during a lesson. The charts may remain displayed in the classroom after a lesson or a unit as reference point for students (e.g., a color chart in Kindergarten). Instructional Aid Charts focus on content, they are artifacts of instruction that may or may not provide useful content information for the future. Look for the quantity/variety, engaging qualities (language, design, content), accessibility (display and organization), and the challenge level (decodability, predictability, and vocabulary) of each. Consider, as well, the degree to which the cultural and linguistic diversity of the texts reflects the student population. <br />Examples: Poems for reading together, morning message, labels, vocabulary lists, Daily Oral Language (DOL) charts.<br />Rubric: Computer/ Electronic TextsInadequate 1ptBasic 3ptsOutstanding 5ptsQuantity/ VarietyFew if any instructional aids (e.g. chalkboard and overhead) are present or used to support instructionEngaging Qualities (Language Design Content)Instructional aids are not part of this classroom, or if they are present they are designed in such a restrictive format as to limit their potential impact (e.g. worksheet collections that are sent home periodically)The instructional aids can be characterized as functional in design and content.The instructional aids on display can be characterized in terms of rich design, and content that is varied and motivating to the full range of developmental levels of the students in this class.Accessibility (Display, Organization)Instructional aids are not in place, or if they are, they are not functional for many of the students in the class. The instructional aids are available to the students in the class. They are moistly legible and accessible for most of the students in the class.The instructional aids are readily available to the students in the class and the teachers for use. They are visible and legible and at an appropriate challenge level for almost all of the students.Challenge Level (decodability, predictability, and vocabulary load)If instructional aids are available they are constructed with text that is accessible to few students in the class.Instructional aids are constructed with text that is accessible to most students in the class.Instructional aids are constructed and accessible to all students in the class (there are a variety of challenge levels represented in the classroom.) <br />Category: Instructional Aid Charts Rating: <br />Definition: Instructional Aid Charts focus on content; they are used to support instruction.<br />DescriptionComments:Quantity/Variety: Board, overhead, transparencies, as well as posters are used as instructional chart. Engaging Qualities (Language Design Content) The content is varied and rich to motivate students at all levels.Accessibility (Display, Organization) They are displayed in a way that is accessible to all students.Challenge Level (decodability, predictability, and vocabulary load) The charts are at different levels so that all my students can access them.<br />Tradebooks<br />These texts are typically found in “book” format and do not have any obvious instructional design features. They are commonly referred to as “library books” although this is somewhat misleading as a reference point. The quantity of these books in relation to the number of students in the class is as important as is the condition of the collection. When considering the range of trade books, pay attention to the variety of genre (e.g. narrative, informational, procedural texts), the structure of the book (e.g. picture books, chapter books), the display and organization of the collection, quantity (multiple copies or text sets), the date of publication, and the appropriateness (e.g. accessibility, content/interest) of the books for the students in the class. Consider, as well, the degree to which the cultural and linguistic diversity of the texts reflects the student population.<br />Rubric: Computer/ Electronic TextsInadequate 1ptBasic 3ptsOutstanding 5ptsQuantity/ VarietyThe classroom contains between 1-7 books per child. Less than 1-% of the collection is non-narrative. Less than 30% of the books have been published in the past 3 years. There is an absence of some types of trade books or an extreme imbalance in the numbers available. Multiple copies of texts are not included.The classroom contains between 8-19 books per child. Between 10-20% of the collection is non-narrative. Between 30-50% of the books have been published in the past 3 years. Picture books, easy chapter books, and challenge books are available, but the proportion is not matched to student needs and interest. Multiple copies of a few of the texts are available.The classroom contains more than 20 books per child. More than 20 % of the collection is non-narrative. More than 50 % of the books have been published in the past three years .There is a balance of picture, easy, chapter, and challenge books available. Multiple copies of many texts are available. Students’ authored books may be included.Engaging Qualities (Language Design Content)The collection is severely limited in terms of books that are rich in the language and design .The content is narrow and not motivating to the full range of developmental levels of the student6s in this class.The majority of the collection can be characterized in terms of rich language, rich design, and content that is varied and motivating to the full range of developmental levels of the students in this class.The collection can be characterized in terms of rich language, rich design, and content that is varied and motivating to the full range of developmental levels of the students in this class.Accessibility (Display, Organization)The few books that are included in the class are not displayed in the classroom in a particularly attractive manner. Texts are restricted to a central library section of the class that is not prominent. The texts are displayed in a manner that has severely restricted accessibility by the students .There is no apparent organization plan for the text that supports student use.The books are displayed in the classroom in an attractive manner. Texts tend to be located in a central library section of the class .The texts are displayed in a manner that provides for easy accessibility by the students .The text are organized in a simple manner that facilitates student ease of use.The texts are displayed in the classroom in a highly attractive and thoughtful manner. Texts are located around the classroom in connection to content. The texts are displayed in a manner that actively encourages student engagement. The texts are organized in a variety of ways that facilities student ease of use (e.g. by authors, type, by content)Challenge Level (decodability, predictability, and vocabulary load)The books included in the collection don’t match well with the range of abilities and skills of the class .The books tend to be either too hard or too easy for the bulk of the students .There is little available for those at the extremes .The books included in the collection are well suited to the average level of the students in the class terms of challenged and support levels (decidability, predictability, and vocabulary).The choices for struggling or an accelerated reader is limited.The books included in the collection offer a wide-range of challenge and support levels (decodability, predictability, and vocabulary) for the students to choose from.<br />Category: Trade books Rating: <br />Definition: These texts are typically found in book format and do not have any obvious instructional design features.<br />Description:Comments:Quantity/Variety:Engaging Qualities (Language Design Content): Accessibility (Display, Organization):Challenge Level (decodability, predictability, and vocabulary load): <br />Reference Materials:<br />These are materials that are used as resources for finding information (e.g. word spellings; locations; how to do something). These materials might be designed for young children. Look for the quantity/ variety, engaging qualities (language, design, content), accessibility (display and organization), and the challenge level (decodability, predictability, and vocabulary) of each. Look for local and commercial texts. Consider how the texts reflect the student population. Example: Atlas, dictionary, encyclopedia, English grammar handbook, thesaurus, Globe, maps.<br />Rubric: Computer/ Electronic TextsInadequate 1ptBasic 3ptsOutstanding 5ptsQuantity/ VarietyOnly limited reference material are available to the students. Most are older.Reference materials are available to students. Some of these are older than 10 years. No multiple copies are available. Reference materials (atlas, dictionary, encyclopedia, etc) are available for all students. All are published within the past 7 years. Multiple copies are available. Engaging Qualities (Language Design Content)Reference materials, if available, are developmentally inappropriate to many of the students skill levels in the class. Poor design and limited content limit the usefulness of the reference materials in a literacy program.Reference materials though limited in number and variety can be characterized as developmentally appropriate to a wide range of student skill levels and rich design, and content that is varied and motivating to the full range of developmental levels of the students in this class.Referenced materials can be characterized as developmentally appropriate to a wide range of student skill levels and rich design, and content that is varied and motivating to the full range of developmental levels of the students in this class.Accessibility (Display, Organization)Access to reference materials is severely limited. Access is limited to students in terms of time as well as limited in terms of the use of particular programs. The physical location of the materials makes them difficult to access.Reference materials are displayed prominently and are available to students for use throughout the day for extended periods of time.Challenge Level (decodability, predictability, and vocabulary load)Reference materials, if available, are inappropriate to the skills and interest of students in the class.Reference materials are appropriate for the average and above average students in the class, but too difficult for the struggling readers.Reference materials are appropriate for use by most of the students in the class.<br />Category: Reference Materials Rating: <br />Definition: These are materials that re used as resources for finding information.<br />DescriptionComments:Quantity/ Variety: Engaging Qualities (Language Design Content): Accessibility (Display, Organization):Challenge Level (decodability, predictability, and vocabulary load): <br />Student/Teacher Published Work:<br />This category consists of locally authored (by a student, a teacher or a combination of the two) books or publications. These texts are on display and accessible for students to read. Students/Teacher Published Work is intended to become part of the long-term class library, as opposed Work Product Displays that are more temporary. Look for the quantity/variety, engaging qualities (language, design, content), accessibility (display and organization), and the challenge level (predictability, and vocabulary) of each. Consider, as well, the degree to which the cultural and linguistic diversity of the texts reflects the student population. Example: Text innovations with big books, individual-student-authored books, reports/inquiry projects.<br />Rubric:Student/Teacher workInadequate1 ptBasic3 ptsOutstanding5 ptsQuantity/VarietyThe classroom does not feature the work of individual students in the class. Or, if student publications are displayed they are severely limited to only a few of the students in the class.The classroom offers a variety of displays that feature student publications. These displays may feature the work of only some of the students in the class.The classroom offers a variety of displays that feature the publications of both students and the teacher in the class. These displays cross curriculum areas and include the work of most of the students in the class.Engaging Qualities (Language Design Content)The publications, if available, are not engaging based on their poor quality, design and language. No comments on the work are offered.The publications are functional in terms of design and use limited language support. There may not be any extended commentary on specific aspects of the work.The publications are creative in design and offer a rich language base. Specific supportive commentary is included that elaborates on the outstanding features of the work.Accessibility(Display ,Organization)The publications, if available, are not displayed in a manner that is accessible to students.The publications are displayed in a manner that is functional in terms of design and use limited language support .There may not be any extended commentary on specific aspects of the work.The publications are prominently displayed in the classroom and are clearly celebrated and a part of the text in the classroom. The texts are displayed in a manner that actively encourages student engagement. The texts are organized in variety of ways that facilitates student ease of use.Challenge Level (decodability, predictability, and vocabulary load)The challenge level is not considered because no commentary is included for students in the class to consider.The commentary by the teacher on student publication is (decodable, accessible, predictable and vocabulary) for almost all.The commentary by the teacher on student publications is (decidable, accessible, predictable and vocabulary) for all.<br />Category: Student/Teacher Publisher Work Rating: <br />Definition: This category consists of locally authored (by student, a teacher or a combination of the two) books or publications.<br />Description:Comments:Quantity/Variety:Engaging Qualities (Language Design Content): Accessibility (Display, Organization):Challenge Level (decodability, predictability, and vocabulary load): <br />Student Interview # 1 ____________________________________ <br />Scale: (5) Elaborate/Enriched (4) Good Understanding (3) Basic Understanding (2) Vague Awareness (1) No knowledge<br />ItemRatingCommentsComputers/ ElectronicsGames/ Puzzles/ManipulativesInstructional Aid ChartsTrade booksReference MaterialsStudent/ Teacher Published Work<br />Student Interview # 2 ____________________________________ <br />Scale: (5) Elaborate/Enriched (4) Good Understanding (3) Basic Understanding (2) Vague Awareness (1) No knowledge<br />ItemRatingCommentsComputers/ ElectronicsGames/ Puzzles/ManipulativesInstructional Aid ChartsTrade booksReference MaterialsStudent/ Teacher Published Work<br />Student Interview #3 ____________________________________ <br />Scale: (5) Elaborate/Enriched (4) Good Understanding (3) Basic Understanding (2) Vague Awareness (1) No knowledge<br />ItemRatingCommentsComputers/ ElectronicsGames/ Puzzles/ManipulativesInstructional Aid ChartsTrade booksReference MaterialsStudent/ Teacher Published Work<br />Teacher Interview Scale: (5) Elaborate/Enriched (4) Good (3) Basic (2) Vague (1) None<br /><ul><li>ItemRanking importanceRating usageCommentsComputers/ ElectronicsGames/ Puzzles/ManipulativesInstructional Aid ChartsTrade booksReference MaterialsStudent/ Teacher Published WorkComputers/ Electronics</li></ul>INTERPRETATION<br />AREAS OF STRENGHT<br />AREAS AND OPPORTUNITIES FOR IMPROVEMENT<br />SUMMARY<br />

×