SWC2012Projects-all

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The Stillaguamish Watershed Council (SWC) has been dedicated to restoring and maintaining a healthy Stillaguamish River Watershed since 1990. The SWC provides a local forum in which agencies, organizations, communities, and the public can engage in a collaborative watershed based process of decision making and coordination. The SWC funds restoration projects throughout the watershed with an emphasis on Chinook Salmon habitat restoration as the Chinook is listed as threatened in the Endangered Species Act. This Slide Show highlights some of the work of the SWC.

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  • Needs blurb and fffpp logo
  • Same as 12
  • Needs blurb and sponsor and logo
  • As 14
  • Needs blurb and sponsor and logo
  • Same as 16
  • Same as 16
  • Needs blurb and sponsor and logo
  • Same as 19
  • Same as 19
  • Same as 19
  • Same as 19
  • Same as 19
  • Same as 19
  • Needs location map. And blurb and sponsor and logo
  • Needs property today photo and blurb and sponsor and logo
  • Needs location map. And blurb and sponsor and logo
  • Needs location map. And blurb and sponsor and logo
  • Needs property today photo and blurb and sponsor and logo
  • Needs property today photo and blurb and sponsor and logo
  • Needs location map. And blurb and sponsor and logo
  • Needs location map. And blurb and sponsor and logo
  • Needs property today photo and blurb and sponsor and logo
  • Needs property today photo and blurb and sponsor and logo
  • Needs location map. And blurb and sponsor and logo
  • Needs location map. And blurb and sponsor and logo
  • Needs property today photo and blurb and sponsor and logo
  • Needs location map. And blurb and sponsor and logo
  • Needs location map. And blurb and sponsor and logo
  • Needs location map. And blurb and sponsor and logo
  • Needs a review of the blurb and logo—snoco?
  • SWC2012Projects-all

    1. 1. www.stillaguamishwatershed.org Dedicated to restoring and maintaining a healthyStillaguamish River Watershed since 1990
    2. 2. The mission of the Stillaguamish Watershed Council(SWC) is to maintain a healthy, functioning Stillaguamish Watershed by providing a local forum in which agencies,organizations, communities, and the public can engage in a collaborative watershed based process of decision making and coordination. This slideshow highlights the work of the SWC www.stillaguamishwatershed.org
    3. 3. Port Susan Bay RestorationSponsored by The Nature Conservancy The Nature Conservancy worked for over 10 years to design and implement a dike removal and set back project in Port Susan Bay. As a result, over 100 acres has been returned to tidal influence. Location
    4. 4. Port Susan Bay RestorationSponsored by The Nature Conservancy The Nature Conservancy removed the dike labeled in red on this map and built a new, set back dike along the area in green. As a result, over 100 acres has been returned to tidal influence, and is providing new habitat for fish and shorebirds. Scope of Work
    5. 5. Port Susan Bay RestorationSponsored by The Nature ConservancyOld Dike Before Old Dike After The Nature Conservancy worked for over 10 years todesign and implement a dikeremoval and set back project in Port Susan Bay. As a result, over 100 acres has been returned to tidal influence. Old Dike During
    6. 6. Port Susan Bay RestorationSponsored by The Nature ConservancyWest Dike Before West Dike After The Nature Conservancy removed this dike in Port Susan. As a result, over 100 acres has been returned to tidal influence, and is now providing new habitat for fish and shorebirds. West Dike During
    7. 7. Port Susan Bay RestorationSponsored by The Nature ConservancyEast Dike Before East Dike After The Nature Conservancy worked for over 10 years todesign and implement a dikeremoval and set back project in Port Susan Bay. As a result, over 100 acres has been returned to tidal influence. East Dike During
    8. 8. Port Susan Bay RestorationSponsored by The Nature ConservancyNew Dike Before New Dike AfterThis new dike helped protect private property from saltwater, while simultaneously providing over 100 new acres of fish and shorebird habitat. New Dike During
    9. 9. Stormwater Wetland SiteSponsored by The City of Arlington The City of Arlingtons new Stormwater Wetland is an innovative new tertiary treatment facility, designed to filter out chemicals and toxic substances before the water is returned to the Stillaguamish River. Location
    10. 10. Stormwater Wetland SiteSponsored by The City of Arlington The City of Arlingtons new Stormwater Wetland is an innovative new tertiary treatment facility, designed to filter out chemicals and toxic substances before the water is returned to the Stillaguamish River. Volunteers planting native vegetation at the wetlandAerial View of Arlington’s StormwaterWetland Near Haller Park
    11. 11. Noxious Weed Control EffortsSponsored by Snohomish County Noxious Weed Control Board The Snohomish County Noxious Weed Control Board oversees the efforts by Snohomish County in controlling the spread and damage done by dangerous invasive weeds such as Spartina and Japanese Knotweed. Pulling Weeds Pulling Weeds Documenting Knotweed
    12. 12. Cherokee Creek Fish Passage RestorationSponsored by Stillaguamish Tribe of Indians The Stillaguamish Tribe, in conjunction with the Family Forest Fish Passage Program, replaced a culvert that was blocking fish passage on Cherokee Creek with a new bridge. As a result approximately 1 mile of new habitat is now accessible to all species of Pacific salmon and trout. Project Location
    13. 13. Cherokee Creek Fish Passage RestorationSponsored by Stillaguamish Tribe of IndiansBefore: This culvert was Bridge Afterpreventing fish fromswimming upstream. The Stillaguamish Tribe, in conjunction with the Family Forest Fish Passage Program, replaced a culvert that was blocking fish passage on Cherokee Creek with a new bridge. During
    14. 14. Jim Creek Bank RestorationSponsored by the Stillaguamish Tribe of Indians The Stillaguamish Tribe of Indians sponsored a riparian restoration project on Jim Creek that involved stabilizing a bank with natural logs and slash, planting a buffer with native vegetation and installing fencing that keeps livestock out of the creek. As a result, the water in Jim Creek downstream will be clearer, cleaner, and more friendly for fish. Location
    15. 15. Jim Creek Bank RestorationSponsored by the Stillaguamish Tribe of IndiansBank Before Bank After The Stillaguamish Tribe of Indians sponsored a riparian restoration project on Jim Creek. As a result, the water downstream will be clearer, cleaner, and more friendly for fish. Bank During
    16. 16. South Fork Riparian RestorationSponsored by the Stillaguamish Tribe of Indians The Stillaguamish Tribe of Indians purchased and planted nearly 60 acres on the South Fork Stillaguamish, across from the mouth of Jim Creek. Location
    17. 17. South Fork Riparian RestorationSponsored by the Stillaguamish Tribe of Indians The Stillaguamish Tribe of Indians purchased and planted nearly 60 acres on the South Fork Floodplain Stillaguamish, across Forest Buffer Enhancement from the mouth of Jim Creek. Bank Armor Mouth of Jim Removed Creek S. Fork Stillaguamish River. Flows left to right in image Restoration Overview
    18. 18. South Fork Riparian RestorationSponsored by the Stillaguamish Tribe of Indians The Stillaguamish Tribe of Indians purchased and planted nearly 60 acres on the South Fork Stillaguamish, across from the mouth of Jim Creek. Local school children helped plant native trees and shrubs, including a meadow and apple orchard for deer habitat. Each blue pipe is a native tree or shrub planted as part of the project. Local Students Planting
    19. 19. Pilchuck Park ConstructionSponsored by the Stillaguamish Tribe of Indians The Stillaguamish Tribe of Indians purchased and restored about 25 acres near the mouth of Pilchuck Creek. Wetland acres were restored to allow for fish and wildlife habitat, and a trail was installed to allow the public to enjoy this beautiful site. Location
    20. 20. Pilchuck Park ConstructionSponsored by the Stillaguamish Tribe of Indians The Stillaguamish Tribe of Indians purchased and restored about 25 acres near the mouth of Pilchuck Wetland Creek. The pink Orange Rehabilitation and orange on this map are acres that Green Buffer were restored to wetlands, providin Wetland g fish and wildlife Pink Reestablishment habitat. White Refugia Pond Pilchuck Park Schematic
    21. 21. Pilchuck Park ConstructionSponsored by the Stillaguamish Tribe of Indians The Stillaguamish Tribe of Indians purchased and restored about 25 acres near the mouth of Pilchuck Creek. Pilchuck Park Before
    22. 22. Pilchuck Park ConstructionSponsored by the Stillaguamish Tribe of Indians The Stillaguamish Tribe of Indians purchased and restored about 25 acres near the mouth of Pilchuck Creek. Wetland acres were restored to allow for fish and wildlife habitat, and a trail was installed to allow the public to enjoy this beautiful site. This educational kiosk was also installed as part of this project. Kiosk during construction Kiosk finished
    23. 23. Pilchuck Park ConstructionSponsored by the Stillaguamish Tribe of Indians The Stillaguamish Tribe of Indians purchased and restored about 25 acres near the mouth of Pilchuck Creek. Wetland acres were restored to allow for fish and wildlife habitat, and a trail was installed to allow the public to enjoy this beautiful site. Containers awaiting planting Left: Students Planting Right: Natural Resources Team Planting
    24. 24. Pilchuck Park ConstructionSponsored by the Stillaguamish Tribe of Indians The Stillaguamish Tribe of Indians purchased and restored about 25 acres near the mouth of Pilchuck Creek. Large woody debris was installed to provide fish and wildlife habitat in the restored wetlands. Large Woody Debris
    25. 25. Pilchuck Park ConstructionSponsored by the Stillaguamish Tribe of Indians Views of the Park Today The Stillaguamish Tribe of Indians purchased and restored about 25 acres near the mouth of Pilchuck Creek. Wetland acres were restored to allow for fish and wildlife habitat. The Stillaguamish Tribe sampled for fish here to determine usage by Stillaguamish Chinook and Coho salmon.
    26. 26. North Fork Riparian RestorationSponsored by the Stillaguamish Tribe of Indians The Stillaguamish Tribe of Indians, in conjunction with Forterra, purchased and restored about 35 acres on the North Fork Stillaguamish. Dilapidated structures were demolished and removed, and a riparian buffer was planted with native vegetation. The Tribe has plans to install engineered log jams at this Location site in the future.
    27. 27. North Fork Riparian RestorationSponsored by the Stillaguamish Tribe of IndiansProperty Before Property Today The Stillaguamish Tribe of Indians, in conjunction with Forterra, purchased and restored about 35 acres on the North Fork Stillaguamish. Dilapidated structures were demolished and removed, and a riparian buffer was planted with native vegetation. The Tribe has plans to install engineered log jams at this site in the future.
    28. 28. North Fork Riparian RestorationSponsored by the Stillaguamish Tribe of Indians The Stillaguamish Tribe of Indians, in conjunction with Forterra, purchased and restored about 35 acres on the North Fork Stillaguamish. Dilapidated structures were demolished and removed, and a riparian buffer was planted with native vegetation. The Tribe has plans to install engineered log jams at this site in the Before future.
    29. 29. Blue Slough ReconnectionSponsored by the Stillaguamish Tribe of Indians This project reconnected 2500 feet of remnant side channel that has been disconnected from the mainstem North Fork Stillaguamish since the 1930s. This project removed a 2-3 foot layer of "muck" and enough bed material to put the channel at the elevation of the river. The final phase of construction installed new corrugated metal culverts to connect the slough to the river at both ends allowing continuous flow through the channel. Location
    30. 30. Blue Slough ReconnectionSponsored by the Stillaguamish Tribe of Indians This project reconnected 2500 feet of remnant side 1,200 ft of improved channel that has been channel disconnected from the 9-ft culvert mainstem North Fork 6-ft culvert Stillaguamish since the 1930s. This project Upper pond removed a 2-3 foot layer Lower pond ~1.27 acres of "muck" and enough bed ~3.65 acres material to put the channel 1,030 ft at the elevation of the channel river. The final phase of construction installed new corrugated metal culverts to connect the slough to the river at both ends allowing continuous flow Project Site Plan through the channel.
    31. 31. Blue Slough ReconnectionSponsored by the Stillaguamish Tribe of Indians This project reconnected a 2500 feet of remnant side channel that has been disconnected from the mainstem North Fork Stillaguamish since the 1930s. The final phase of construction installed new corrugated metal culverts to connect the slough to the river at both ends allowing continuous flow through the channel and providing winter and summer rearing for chinook juveniles. In addition, a log jam complex was installed near the upstream culvert to provide backwater refuge for smolts entering the side channel
    32. 32. Blue Slough ReconnectionSponsored by the Stillaguamish Tribe of Indians Coho and Chum were seen spawning in the channel soon after reconnection This project reconnected a 2500 feet of remnant side channel that has been disconnected from the mainstem North Fork Stillaguamish since the 1930s. The final phase of construction installed new corrugated metal culverts to connect the slough to the river at both ends allowing continuous flow through the channel and providing winter and summer rearing for chinook juveniles. In addition, a log jam complex was installed near the upstream culvert to provide backwater refuge for smolts entering the side channel
    33. 33. Steelhead Haven Fine Sediment Reduction ProjectSponsored by the Stillaguamish Tribe of Indians This project built a wood revetment 500 feet from the toe of the Steelhead haven landslide thereby reducing fine sediment inputs into the North Fork Stillaguamish. A sediment retention pond was also constructed to capture surface erosion off of the landslide, also reducing fine sediment inputs into the NF Stillaguamish. Location
    34. 34. Steelhead Haven Fine Sediment Reduction ProjectSponsored by the Stillaguamish Tribe of Indians Expected Change This project built a wood revetment 500 feet from the toe of the Steelhead haven landslide thereby Log Cribwall Placement reducing fine sediment inputs into the North Fork Stillaguamish. A Expected Channel Migration sediment retention pond was also constructed to Expected Head cut capture surface erosion off of the landslide, also reducing fine sediment inputs into the NF Stillaguamish. Project Site Plan
    35. 35. Steelhead Haven Fine Sediment Reduction ProjectSponsored by the Stillaguamish Tribe of Indians Cribwall 1,300 feet long, 25 feet What the river will see high This project built a wood revetment 500 feet from the toe of the Steelhead haven landslide thereby reducing fine sediment inputs into the North Fork Stillaguamish.
    36. 36. Steelhead Haven Fine Sediment Reduction ProjectSponsored by the Stillaguamish Tribe of Indians This project built a wood revetment 500 feet from the toe of the Steelhead haven landslide thereby reducing fine sediment inputs into the North Fork Stillaguamish. Left: Aerial view of the wood revetment backfilled with wood debris Below: Close up of backfill
    37. 37. Steelhead Haven Fine Sediment Reduction ProjectSponsored by the Stillaguamish Tribe of Indians 20 Acre-feet of storage During the first flooding event the river migrated toward the structure as designedA sediment retention pond was also constructed to capture surfaceerosion off of the landslide, also reducing fine sediment inputs intothe NF Stillaguamish.
    38. 38. North Meander Reconnection ProjectSponsored by Snohomish County The North Meander project increases side-channel slough habitat by 1.8 hectares - an increase of 18.5% over existing amounts - or 8% of the historical loss in lower river, by reconnecting 3,300 feet of side channel. 300 pieces of large woody debris were placed for complex edge and cover. A box culvert and a bridge were installed to reconnect the channel. Location
    39. 39. North Meander Reconnection ProjectSponsored by Snohomish County The North Meander project increases side-channel slough habitat by 1.8 hectares - an increase of 18.5% over existing amounts - or 8% of the historical loss in lower river, by reconnecting 3,300 feet of side channel. 300 pieces of large woody debris were placed for complex edge and cover. A box culvert and a bridge were installed to reconnect the channel. Left: Project Site Plan
    40. 40. North Meander Reconnection ProjectSponsored by Snohomish County Bridge installed to reconnect the channelCulvert installed to reconnect thechannel A box culvert and a bridge were installed to reconnect the channel and to allow for fish passage
    41. 41. North Meander Reconnection ProjectSponsored by Snohomish County 300 pieces of woody debris were placed to increase channel complexity and to create pools and cover for fish.
    42. 42. Eagle Creek Barrier Removal and Riparian RestorationSponsored by the City of Arlington This project directly addresses the degraded conditions by working with the private landowner to repair and restore the first 1000’ (12%) of the stream’s riparian corridor, and to provide for fish passage to the upper 9000’ of stream corridor through the removal of two collapsed culverts & enhancement of native riparian vegetation largely with native conifers and riparian shrubs. Location
    43. 43. Eagle Creek Barrier Removal and Riparian RestorationSponsored by the City of Arlington This project will directly address these degraded conditions by working with the private landowner to repair and restore the first 1000’ (12%) of the stream’s riparian corridor, and to provide for fish passage to the upper 9000’ of stream corridor through the removal of two collapsed culverts & enhancement of native riparian vegetation largely with native conifers and riparian shrubs. Volunteers planting native riparian vegetation
    44. 44. Wastewater Plant UpdatedSponsored by the City of Arlington Wastewater plant was upgraded to a Membrane Bioreactor Water Reclamation plant
    45. 45. Riparian Enhancement Inmate CrewSponsored by the Stillaguamish Tribe of Indians The Stillaguamish Tribe has partnered with the Snohomish County Department of Corrections to establish a Riparian Enhancement Inmate Crew. Minimum security inmates participate in this program, helping with a variety of restoration projects throughout our watershed. They control dangerous invasive weeds and plant thousands of native plants each year.
    46. 46. For more information about the Stillaguamish Watershed Council visit our website at: www.stillaguamishwatershed.org

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