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Failed Sim

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Carlton Reeve's talk at GLS7 on why simulations sometimes fail to deliver learning to adults.

Carlton Reeve's talk at GLS7 on why simulations sometimes fail to deliver learning to adults.

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  • INTRO Like the interview question - what’s your worst trait? Not interview but therapy Virtual School - Educational simulation for teachers
  • CONTEXT BBC WIL NCSL Blair initiative Teachers - Leadership in schools New programme - LftM
  • AIMS & OBJECTIVES LftM - emergent leaders - 5 aims • Leadership of innovation and change • Knowledge and understanding of their role in leading teaching and learning • Enhancing self-confidence and skills as team leaders • Building team capacity through the efficient use of staff and resources • Active engagement in self-directed change in a blended learning environment Delivered through coaching , project , e- learning , community & VS VS - practicum, sand-pit - cf VirtualU • Raise awareness of ongoing issues • Provide a ' sand-pit ' for experimentation • Stimulate discussion in online forums • Provide scenarios to develop key skills , particularly communications • Offer users the chance to role-play • Illustrate key points from within the modules & build confidence
  • 51% “not much” - British understatement - this sucks So why didn’t it work? Not through lack of trying...testing, revisions, multiple sign-offs
  • [Explain process] visit Miss Dove’s classroom (not teacher - HoD)
  • 2. deal with various/ multiple scenarios expertly written - all plausible options - no failure
  • Out into corridor
  • Return to classroom
  • scenarios with quantitative and qualitative but delayed feedback mixed aim to stimulate discussion - actually created confusion NEED - Clarity, timing & explicit
  • NEED - variety, failure & reward
  • not just VS lack of connection - little integration ‘ active’ components less popular NEED - narrative, infrastructure
  • Single player + Scaffolding - Margaret ‘ in virtual school no one can hear you scream!’ NEED - transparency, integration
  • conservative audience/ commissioners design style - too game-like, too flippant NEED - value, Just In Time Go home to do more of the same work without clear benefits
  • Response: disaggregated scenarios changed use context - now group-based removed cartoon design integrated into face-2-face design style - too game-like
  • Traci Sitzmann & Katherine Ely: “ post-training self-efficacy was 20% higher, declarative knowledge was 11% higher, procedural knowledge was 14% higher, and retention was 9% higher for trainees taught with simulation games... However, trainees learned less from simulation games than comparison instructional methods when the instruction the comparison group received as a substitute for the simulation game actively engaged them in the learning experience.”
  • Transcript

    • 1. Simulating failure: <ul><li>Why simulations don’t always work </li></ul>carlton reeve e: carlton@playwithlearning.com w: playwithlearning.com t: @carlton
    • 2. Context
    • 3.  
    • 4. Evaluation
    • 5. Evaluation
    • 6. Failures <ul><li>Feedback </li></ul><ul><li>Engagement </li></ul><ul><li>Integration </li></ul><ul><li>Collaboration </li></ul><ul><li>Culture </li></ul>
    • 7. Feedback <ul><li>“ I enjoyed making decisions, although, so far, I've had no effect on anyone's morale, or...anything!” </li></ul>
    • 8. Feedback
    • 9. Feedback
    • 10. Feedback
    • 11. Feedback
    • 12. Feedback
    • 13. Engagement
    • 14. Integration
    • 15. Collaboration
    • 16. Culture
    • 17. And the good news <ul><li>“ We had to work together ... This turned out to be a very positive experience because we had to discuss everything and we learned together!” </li></ul>
    • 18. Response
    • 19. My lessons <ul><li>Authenticity is a double-edged sword </li></ul><ul><li>Fun can be suspicious </li></ul><ul><li>Peers are everything </li></ul>
    • 20. Thank you. <ul><li>Questions? </li></ul>carlton reeve e: carlton@playwithlearning.com w: playwithlearning.com t: @carlton

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