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Cim 20100701 jul_2010
Cim 20100701 jul_2010
Cim 20100701 jul_2010
Cim 20100701 jul_2010
Cim 20100701 jul_2010
Cim 20100701 jul_2010
Cim 20100701 jul_2010
Cim 20100701 jul_2010
Cim 20100701 jul_2010
Cim 20100701 jul_2010
Cim 20100701 jul_2010
Cim 20100701 jul_2010
Cim 20100701 jul_2010
Cim 20100701 jul_2010
Cim 20100701 jul_2010
Cim 20100701 jul_2010
Cim 20100701 jul_2010
Cim 20100701 jul_2010
Cim 20100701 jul_2010
Cim 20100701 jul_2010
Cim 20100701 jul_2010
Cim 20100701 jul_2010
Cim 20100701 jul_2010
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Transcript of "Cim 20100701 jul_2010"

  1. 1. Contents Zoom In Zoom Out For navigation instructions please click here Search Issue Next Page SOLUTIONS FOR PREMISES AND CAMPUS JULY 2010 COMMUNICATION SYSTEMS WORLDWIDE AVOIDING THE cell-signal dance PAGE 13 DESIGN PAGE 7 IP video’s role in campus security DATA CENTER PAGE 25 A decade-long data center buildout WIRELESS PAGE 31 Boost your capability with four-pair PoE w w w.c ablingins t all.c o m Contents Zoom In Zoom Out For navigation instructions please click here Search Issue Next Page
  2. 2. C Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Refer a Friend A Installation 7Maintenance | Search Issue | Next Page BMaGS E F Why Settlefor Less ? While other manufacturers want extra for birdie performance in a cable, here at Corning Cable Systems, we thought we’d just make that par for the course. All LANscape® Solutions 50 micron multimode cables contain ClearCurve® Multimode Fiber. That’s bend-insensitive multimode – so no matter what your network faces, you’ve got signal integrity in the bag. Learn more at offers.corning.com/1-CIM-CC _______________________ © 2010 Corning Cable Systems LLC C Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Refer a Friend A Installation 7Maintenance | Search Issue | Next Page BMaGS E F
  3. 3. C Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Refer a Friend A Installation 7Maintenance | Search Issue | Next Page BMaGS E F Fits 3x as much. Go ahead, pull 3x as many cables as usual. MaxCell can take it. And you’ll only need 1/3 the manpower to get the job done. Plus you can overlay with MaxCell. More cables per conduit, less labor, and the ability to overlay. That’s the flexibility of MaxCell. www.maxcell.us __________________ 888.387.3828 More space. More productivity. 10 Y E A R S O F M A X I M I ZI N G P RO D U CT IVI T Y C Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Refer a Friend A Installation 7Maintenance | Search Issue | Next Page BMaGS E F
  4. 4. C Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Refer a Friend A Installation 7Maintenance | Search Issue | Next Page BMaGS E F a new world of unrivaled integrated solutions OCC is recognized as the gold standard in an industry that demands speed, technology, and durability. Our expanded product offering includes fiber optic and copper cabling, as well as connectivity components designed for commercial, specialty, and harsh-environment applications. We have broadened our scope, creating a single source of integrated solutions for our customers. 800-622-7711 | Canada 800-443-5262 To learn more, visit occfiber.com or call for a free catalog. C Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Refer a Friend A Installation 7Maintenance | Search Issue | Next Page BMaGS E F
  5. 5. C Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Refer a Friend A Installation 7Maintenance | Search Issue | Next Page BMaGS E F JULY 2010 | VOLUME 18 NO. 7 ABOUT THE COVER :: FEATURES Distributed antenna systems can ease DESIGN the frustration of lacking a cell signal in- doors. But running wireless LAN traffic 7 IP video’s role in campus security Real-life scenarios play out in a hypothetical campus over a DAS has its own drawbacks. environment. SCOTT V. BURKHARDT TO LEARN MORE, SEE ARTICLE ON PAGE 13. INSTALLATION Group Publisher Susan Smith (603) 891-9447; susans@pennwell.com Chief Editor Patrick McLaughlin 13 Dos and don’ts of WLAN and DAS Resist the temptation to run 802.11 traffic over a (603) 891-9222; patrick@pennwell.com Senior Editor Matt Vincent distributed antenna system. SCOTT THOMPSON (603) 891-9262; mattv@pennwell.com Marketing Manager Joni Montemagno Art Director Kelli Mylchreest TECHNOLOGY Production Manager Mari Rodriguez Senior Illustrator Dan Rodd Development Manager Michelle Blake 17 Bringing fiber-to-the-x technology into the enterprise Ad Traffic Manager Alison Boyer Passive Optical LANs bring a track record of outside-plant success. PATRICK MCLAUGHLIN EDITORIAL OFFICES PennWell Corporation, DATA CENTER Cabling Installation & Maintenance 98 Spit Brook Road LL-1 Nashua, NH 03062-5737 25 Top of the class in campus networking Tel: (603) 891-0123, fax: (603) 891-9245 www.cablinginstall.com George Mason University’s core data CORPORATE OFFICERS center has been 10 years in the making. Chairman Frank T. Lauinger President and CEO Robert F. Biolchini CAROL EVERETT OLIVER, RCDD, ESS Chief Financial Officer Mark C. Wilmoth TECHNOLOGY GROUP WIRELESS Senior Vice President & Publishing Director Christine A. Shaw Senior Vice President, Audience Development 31 The capabilites of four-pair PoE 802.11n wireless LANs and IP surveillance systems Gloria Adams For subscription inquiries: require more power than ever. SANI RONEN Tel: (847) 559-7520; Fax: (847) 291-4816 e-mail: cim@omeda.com; :: web:www.cim-subscribe.com DEPARTMENTS CABLING INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE © 2010 (ISSN 1073-3108), is published 12 times a year, Monthly, by PennWell Corporation, 1421 South Sheridan Road, Tulsa, OK 74112; phone (918) 835-3161; fax (918) 831-9497; www.pennwell. _ Periodicals postage paid at Tulsa, OK 74112 and other additional com. offices. Subscription rate in the USA: 1 yr. $88, 2 yr. $119, BG $161; Canada/ 4 Editorial Somebody get me a doctor Mexico: 1 yr. $98, 2 yr. $132, BG $178; International via air: 1 yr. $120, 2 yr. $160, BG $216; Digital: 1 yr. $60. If available, back issues can be purchased for $22 in the U.S. and $32 elsewhere. All rights reserved. No material may be reprinted. Bulk reprints can be ordered from The YGS Group (cim@theygsgroup.com). We make portions of our subscriber list available to carefully screened companies that offer products and services that may be important for your work. If you do not want to receive those offers and/or information via direct mail, please let us know 36 Editor’s Picks IEEE 802.11n standard available for free by contacting us at List Services Cabling Installation & Maintenance, 98 Spit Brook Road LL-1, Nashua, NH 03062. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Cabling Installation & Maintenance, 40 P.O. Box 3425, Northbrook, IL 60065-3280. Return undeliverable Canadian addresses to: P.O. Box 122, Niagara Falls, ON, Canada L2E 6S4. PRINTED IN THE USA. Perspective GST No. 126813153 Publications Mail Agreement no. 1421727 The benefit of snagless RJ-45 plugs www.cablinginstall.com Cabling Installation & Maintenance JULY 2010 3 C Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Refer a Friend A Installation 7Maintenance | Search Issue | Next Page BMaGS E F
  6. 6. C Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Refer a Friend A Installation 7Maintenance | Search Issue | Next Page BMaGS E F :: EDITORIAL :: on cablinginstall.com Somebody get me a doctor Recently I had multiple occasions to a majority of decision makers believe witness fi rsthand some of the tech- the emergence of telehealth will have STANDARDS nological developments taking place a major role in improving the quality IEEE ratifies 40/100- Gbit Ethernet standard in the medical field, and in the pro- and delivery of care to an increasingly cess got an inkling of how some of chronically ill and aging population. DATA CENTER these goings-on might The other recent experience that Energy Star for Data drive the need for robust opened my eyes to the health care Centers program launches network infrastructure industry’s potential for increased (that’s cabling to you bandwidth consumption was when I DESIGN/INSTALL and me) among medical heard a nurse at that same local hos- Demarc extension facilities. pital, while taking patient information, expertise on video In one case the term make the following comment: “We “telehealth” probably just switched over to this last week, so NETWORK CABLE best describes the appli- I’m being careful to make sure I do it Small-diameter Cat 6A cation. Someone I know was hospital- right.” The “this” was electronic medi- cable boosts fill capacity ized for a couple weeks and upon her cal records; rather than using a pen to CONNECTIVITY release, her doctors wanted to keep write patient information on paper, the Fiber-connector training, tabs on some vital signs and things of nurse was using keystrokes to enter it support via iPhone the sort. So fi rst thing every morning, into a database. she used in-home equipment to mea- Something told me that the patient WIRELESS sure her weight and blood pressure. data being taken at that moment 802.11n market skyrockets Through an ordinary telephone line would physically reside somewhere while 802.11g falls the data was sent from her home to not far from the data being received the hospital, where it was accessed remotely that same morning. The IP CONVERGENCE by ... well, I’m not sure by whom. But physical location is a data center that, Fiber technology is the point is, the data was stored in a like many others, has challenges transforming A/V production central location (isn’t that why they’re related to power, cooling, data storage, BLOG called data centers in the fi rst place?) and high-speed communications. Which cable to choose with similar information from everyone These two examples are the prover- for Gigabit Ethernet? else who “telecommuted” to the medi- bial tip of the iceberg when it comes cal center that day. to data and bandwidth issues in the Visit cablinginstall.com for In May we noted on cablinginstall. health care field. In the coming months these and other stories. com that recent survey results show we’ll delve deeper into these issues health care IT professionals expect and explain how they might affect the telehealth to dramatically change how profession in which we work. health care is delivered in the United PATRICK McLAUGHLIN States over the next decade. The study, Chief Editor sponsored by Intel Corp., found that patrick@pennwell.com 4 JULY 2010 Cabling Installation & Maintenance www.cablinginstall.com C Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Refer a Friend A Installation 7Maintenance | Search Issue | Next Page BMaGS E F
  7. 7. C Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Refer a Friend A Installation 7Maintenance | Search Issue | Next Page BMaGS E F Which of these is a bigger threat to your security investment? Products. Technology. Services. Delivered Globally. The wrong cabling The right cabling infrastructure can infrastructure is hinder the performance critical to the of even the most Blurred, unusable video successful operation Crystal clear video sophisticated video over minimally compliant and useful life of a over ipAssured IP-ClassSM Category 5e cable 10+ cable surveillance system. security system. Factors that affect the performance of cabling infrastructure: Anixter ipAssuredSM is an infrastructure assurance program that matches • The migration of a security • The need for Power over Ethernet the cabling infrastructure to the security equipment based on the technical, system to IP Plus and beyond application and life-cycle requirements of the user. • Minimally compliant • Installation practices Receive the best performance for the anticipated life of your security system Category 5e cable • Environmental conditions by installing an ipAssured cabling infrastructure. • Increasing bandwidth requirements • Quality of IP cable manufacturing CommScope Uniprise Solutions® make it possible to implement a structured cabling system that is simple, affordable and ensures quality performance for telecommunications needs today and tomorrow. These integrated solutions incorporate products that are engineered to meet network requirements while balancing cost and performance. Contact your local Anixter representative or visit anixter.com/ipassured10 to learn how Anixter ipAssured can protect your security investment. 1.800.ANIXTER anixter.com © 2010 Anixter Inc. Anixter is a leading global supplier of communications and security products, electrical and electronic wire and cable, fasteners and other small components. We help our customers specify solutions and make informed purchasing decisions around technology, applications and relevant standards. Throughout the world, we provide innovative supply chain management services to reduce our customers’ total cost of production and implementation. C Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Refer a Friend A Installation 7Maintenance | Search Issue | Next Page BMaGS E F
  8. 8. C Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Refer a Friend A Installation 7Maintenance | Search Issue | Next Page BMaGS E F ____________________ C Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Refer a Friend A Installation 7Maintenance | Search Issue | Next Page BMaGS E F
  9. 9. C Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Refer a Friend A Installation 7Maintenance | Search Issue | Next Page BMaGS E F :: DESIGN :: The role if IP video in campus security cell phones and computers to a devel- oping situation providing instructions Real-life security scenarios are addressed on what to do and where to go in order in a hypothetical campus environment. to remain safe. What is missing is the ability to see the whole campus at BY SCOTT V. BURKHARDT, CANON USA once, so a video surveillance system is desperately needed. For those who work in the field of cam- The campus is patrolled by uniformed Fortunately, like many of the col- pus security, keeping students and fac- campus police backed by local law leges/universities in America, all build- ulty safe is of the highest importance. enforcement, all of whom can quickly ings on the Grand Lakes University With recent high-profi le incidents respond to issues on campus. Already campus are wired with high-speed capturing national headlines, cam- pus security departments are under Grand Lakes University campus intense pressure to improve public safety on campus. The recent proliferation of afford- able Internet Protocol (IP)/network security cameras is helping accom- plish this goal by providing additional eyes in strategic locations within a campus. These cameras allow security personnel to remotely monitor activity 24/7 and quickly dispatch officers in response to emerging safety and secu- rity issues. A number of factors must be con- sidered when designing a security system for a college or university. To illustrate this, let’s build a system for POE-powered POE-powered Externally-powered Externally-powered fixed-angle camera PTZ camera fixed-angle camera fixed-angle camera Grand Lakes University, a hypothetical small to mid-size campus with clearly Comprehensive surveillance coverage at the fictional Grand Lakes University requires careful placement of fi xed-angle and pan/tilt/zoom cameras, some of defi ned boundaries. which are externally powered and some of which employ Power over Ethernet Grand Lakes University encom- passes numerous buildings, includ- in place is an email/short message ser- Internet capabilities. This makes IP/ ing lecture halls, administration build- vice (SMS) text system that quickly network video cameras a logical choice ings, a student union and dormitories. alerts students and faculty via their as they can be positioned almost www.cablinginstall.com Cabling Installation & Maintenance JULY 2010 7 C Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Refer a Friend A Installation 7Maintenance | Search Issue | Next Page BMaGS E F
  10. 10. C Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Refer a Friend A Installation 7Maintenance | Search Issue | Next Page BMaGS E F :: DESIGN :: anywhere to throw a surveillance net performance during low-light and vari- that prevent a clear view of the entire over all activities on campus. able-light conditions, lens properties area at once. such as zoom magnification and wide Typically these cameras come with Selecting models and locations angles, durability and vandalism pro- a more-powerful zoom lens than their Obviously, entrances and exits to the tection, and pan/tilt ranges to maxi- fi xed-camera-angle counterparts. With campus and high-traffic buildings are mize coverage of larger areas. The rep- a powerful pan/tilt/zoom (PTZ) cam- of primary concern. Less obvious loca- utation of the manufacturer and their era, campus security can detect suspi- tions, however, such as dark alleyways, experience in the field should also be cious behavior, dispatch officers to the remote parking lots and sensitive infra- taken into account. scene and track an individual’s move- structure such as power plants and ments until officers arrive. waste-disposal facilities also should PTZ, vandal resistance Limiting the impact of vandalism rank high on the priority list for video For interior entrances, exits and hall- is a major concern for system plan- surveillance. In addition, large open ways, fi xed-position cameras with a ners. As we all know, college stu- public spaces need coverage, fre- modest zoom lens can provide ade- dents can sometimes be—for lack of a quently from multiple vantage points quate coverage. However, there are better word—mischievous. A camera to see around and behind obstructions. many instances when pan and tilt damaged due to vandalism can place When selecting IP/network cam- capabilities are desirable, including students at risk, and repeated camera eras for these locations you must con- large outdoor applications, areas with repair or replacement can become sider the following: power and cabling multiple brightness levels such as dark costly. options, image quality, output formats, corners, and areas with obstructions Some manufacturers have _____________________ C Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Refer a Friend A Installation 7Maintenance | Search Issue | Next Page BMaGS E F
  11. 11. C Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Refer a Friend A Installation 7Maintenance | Search Issue | Next Page BMaGS E F OUR BEST IDEAS COME FROM YOU You asked for a cable that has substantiated green properties, and we responded. General Cable now offers halogen-free Brand UL-Rated Riser (CMR) cable options at a competitive price. By removing halogens, which are Group 17 on the Periodic Table, the cable has reduced toxicity. This results in a truly “green” cable which is less toxic and more environmentally friendly. 17 FREE (800) 424-5666 www.generalcable.com Share your ideas. We’re listening: Datacom@GeneralCable.com C Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Refer a Friend A Installation 7Maintenance | Search Issue | Next Page BMaGS E F
  12. 12. C Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Refer a Friend A Installation 7Maintenance | Search Issue | Next Page BMaGS E F :: DESIGN :: introduced vandal domes to pro- of impact-resistant plastic and dark Cabling considerations tect their cameras. While features tints should not interfere with the cam- As it is with any cabling job, the loca- of these domes vary, a good van- era’s functioning. A good vandal dome tion of cameras can create chal- dal dome camera will have a mecha- is an essential component of most lenges. For Grand Lakes University, nism that allows the camera to com- installations and helps protect cam- the challenge also involves managing pensate for sudden shocks, such as eras from damage caused by incidental costs and minimizing campus disrup- a multi-directional spring-mounted impacts and the occasional mischie- tions during installation. The ideal base. The dome should also be made vous student. camera will be flexible enough to accommodate a variety of power options including Power over Ethernet (PoE), independent direct- current lines, tapping existing power on-site and adaptability for solar power to save energy. One of the IP/network camera’s major benefits is PoE, which is the ability to receive both data and power from a single twisted-pair cable. For runs of less than 100 meters, a single cable with a minimum performance level of Category 5 can do it all; just plug into a PoE power source (either built into the switch in what is known as endspan powering or in the form of a midspan device like a PoE-enabled patch panel) inside an intermediate crossconnect and power up. This helps reduce time and costs by streamlining installations, and also reduces disrup- tions on campus. For those camera locations that require longer runs, PoE extenders, also called repeaters, can be employed easily to allow cable runs of sev- eral hundred meters. One important consideration to make is the power _______________ consumption of all the devices con- nected to that power source, includ- ing IP phones and other PoE devices, to ensure there is enough power to run all of them. Cameras with PTZ abilities have servos that move the camera and refocus the lens, requiring more power than stationary cameras. 10 JULY 2010 Cabling Installation & Maintenance www.cablinginstall.com C Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Refer a Friend A Installation 7Maintenance | Search Issue | Next Page BMaGS E F
  13. 13. C Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Refer a Friend A Installation 7Maintenance | Search Issue | Next Page BMaGS E F :: DESIGN :: Image quality and camera processors are extremely useful when incidents included with the packaging, but in While there are a wide range of IP/net- occur, but often wide-angle views most instances of campus security a work cameras to choose from in the are preferred as they can cover larger more-complex system is needed. The marketplace, you should give prefer- areas. The ideal camera will strike a interface should be intuitive for officers ence to cameras that have purpose- balance of both of these needs. and supervisors to use, provide all the built optics, the ability to keep objects The camera’s processor should be necessary controls on a single screen, in focus during PTZ operation, and able to automatically compensate for and require minimal staff training to superior zoom capabilities to capture changing brightness levels and back- use properly. small details such as identifying marks lit subjects, and operate well in low- With a new surveillance system on subjects, unique clothing or num- light situations. In addition, the camera in place, Grand Lakes University bers from license plates. Currently should be able to maintain color accu- has taken an important step in safe- available cameras provide up to 40x racy in low light, as these details can guarding security on campus. IP/net- optical zoom, which can reproduce provide useful information in identify- work cameras help campus security much greater detail than cameras with ing suspects. quickly respond to situations while limited optical zoom capabilities. This keeping supervisors informed of what extra detail can prove valuable to cam- Using the new system is going on. pus security by providing them with A variety of interfaces are available actionable information that can be to harness the power of IP/network SCOTT V. BURKHARDT is marketing transmitted to officers in the field. cameras. Some cameras come with a programs specialist, VCS marketing, at Powerful optical zoom capabilities scaled-down version of their interface Canon USA (www.usa.canon.com). Get the multimode fiber that turns on a dime. OFS’ LaserWave® FLEX multimode fiber minimizes bending loss at bend radii as low as 7.5 mm – that’s less than the radius of a dime! LaserWave FLEX Fiber is ideal for use in high-density data centers and enterprise LAN applications, promoting compact system design and better space utilization while simplifying jumper installation and routing. To learn more, ask your cabler about OFS or visit ofsoptics.com/fiber. www.cablinginstall.com Cabling Installation & Maintenance JULY 2010 11 C Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Refer a Friend A Installation 7Maintenance | Search Issue | Next Page BMaGS E F
  14. 14. C Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Refer a Friend A Installation 7Maintenance | Search Issue | Next Page BMaGS E F Quality and Value. V-Line Delivers It Fast! Introducing an expanded line of affordable electronic enclosures from Cooper B-Line. High-quality electronic enclosures that fit your budget and are available for delivery in just days: that’s V-Line from Cooper B-Line. These easy-to- install, easy-to-use enclosures feature a fully welded steel four-post design, and come in the most popular sizes and configurations – in as little as 48 hours from order to shipment! For additional information or to download a free product brochure, visit www.cooperbline.com/v-line. www.cooperbline.com/v-line C Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Refer a Friend A Installation 7Maintenance | Search Issue | Next Page BMaGS E F
  15. 15. C Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Refer a Friend A Installation 7Maintenance | Search Issue | Next Page BMaGS E F :: INSTALLATION :: Dos and don’ts of WLAN and DAS with fi ber-optic distribution to remote access radio frequency (RF) convert- Wise users will resist the temptation to run 802.11 ers and antennas. In any case, as the wireless traffic over a distributed antenna system. name implies, the antennas are dis- tributed throughout the facility, and SCOTT THOMPSON, OBERON the active equipment, whether a micro-base station, repeater or other Recently I attended a large trade show outdoor cellular services, indoors. The cellular equipment, is safely locked in at an exhibit hall in the nation’s capi- purpose of the DAS is to overcome the telecommunications room. tal. There were several thousand peo- the severe attenuation caused by the This, of course, is a different archi- ple in the hall, and within the facil- walls and structure of a building. Even tecture than the standard 802.11 ity there were popular, actively sought the newly auctioned 700- locales wherein people were dipping MHz band, with its preferred and turning, holding their heads side- propagation characteristics, ways, looking upward, rotating, stoop- will be challenged to provide ing and thrusting upward. Then, inev- the high signal-to-noise ratio itably, the person would look at the (SNR) required for perva- device in their hand in frustration. sive high-speed data services And those were the few spots in the envisioned for the emerging hall that actually had a cellular signal. 4G network. Most people have had the expe- Clearly, as people become rience of poor cellular service inside more dependent on mobile buildings, and often these buildings are voice and data services, there large public facilities. In addition to the is a growing expectation for user inconvenience caused by the poor network connectivity every- connection, the carriers lose minutes where—indoors and outdoors. and the building’s utility—whether as DAS and related in-building a mall, public hall or other venue—is wireless systems provide a compromised. Everybody loses. means to match this expec- tation, even in the most chal- Distributed antenna systems have migrated inside facilities to prevent this familiar scene, a DAS emerges lenging indoor environments. wireless device user frustrated over the lack of a Fortunately there is a reasonable solu- The DAS may be as sim- signal indoors. tion for an in-building wireless solu- ple as an outdoor pickup tion called a distributed antenna antenna with bidirectional amplifiers wireless local area network (LAN) system (DAS). DAS is a method for and indoor antennas; or it may be a architecture, which comprises distrib- re-creating the coverage of primarily much more sophisticated base-station uted access points (with connected www.cablinginstall.com Cabling Installation & Maintenance JULY 2010 13 C Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Refer a Friend A Installation 7Maintenance | Search Issue | Next Page BMaGS E F
  16. 16. C Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Refer a Friend A Installation 7Maintenance | Search Issue | Next Page BMaGS E F :: INSTALLATION :: antennas), versus distributed antennas. does not certify, endorse or provide enclosures. These enclosures provide In the past, the difference in archi- RF support for Wi-Fi deployments a degree of physical security commen- tecture was not important. The wire- over any distributed antenna sys- surate with the value of the access less LAN is a private network, com- missioned by the premises network administrator, whereas DAS systems The 700-MHz band will be challenged may have multiple stakeholders includ- ing building owners/operators, carri- to provide high enough SNR. ers, third-party integrators and prem- ises network administrators. tem.” The statement can be found at point. Sometimes the concern is not so http://bit.ly/d7uynU. much malicious theft or vandalism of WLAN over DAS? Although not specifically precluding the access points, but just accidental As DAS solutions emerge, one might the use of Cisco wireless LAN products displacement, disconnection or block- be compelled to include private wire- in a DAS, the statement recommends age from the desired location. Again, less LAN traffic over the DAS, the special consideration of signal cover- the locking ceiling or wall-mount argument being, “Why build two wire- age, client-to-access-point density, cli- enclosure is the answer. less infrastructures?” The answer to ent roaming, location-based services If the answer is to reduce installa- that question is that most vendors’ and the impact of the multiple-input/ tion and cabling cost by combining 802.11 wireless networking products multiple-output (MIMO) antennas the DAS and wireless LAN, then con- are designed for a distributed access used by 802.11n access points. Cisco’s sider coordinating design and instal- positioning statement lation of conventional but distinct goes on to recommend wireless LAN and DAS infrastruc- an appropriate design tures, including shared infrastructure, and deployment if a pathways and spaces where appropri- DAS approach is used, ate. This is an overlay design and can because the “DAS ven- include shared workspace telecom- dor and/or systems munications enclosures for access integrator is solely points, remote access units, bidirec- responsible for the sup- tional amplifiers, converters, repeaters port of the DAS prod- and antennas. ucts and for providing Another emerging technology may adequate RF cover- truly converge public cellular services age and supporting any onto private wireless LANs, but that is a Those tempted to run wireless LAN traffic over a DAS RF-related issues.” topic for a future article. out of concern for the physical security of access points In the meantime, the wireless LAN should consider using devices like this ceiling-mount enclosure. Other options and DAS designer should consider ven- Why would you operate dor recommendations, risk and cost- point approach, not a distributed the wireless LAN over the DAS in the saving potential when deploying wire- antenna (DAS) approach. Generally fi rst place? If the answer is “physical less LAN over DAS, versus an overlay speaking, when you use something in security” of the wireless LAN access design comprising wireless LAN and a way for which it was not intended, points (and that’s the only security at DAS components.. you do not get the results you want. stake with correctly deployed access Cisco recently released a position- points), then you should plan to secure SCOTT THOMPSON is president of ing statement indicating that “Cisco the APs in locking ceiling or wall Oberon Inc. (www.oberonwireless.com). 14 JULY 2010 Cabling Installation & Maintenance www.cablinginstall.com C Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Refer a Friend A Installation 7Maintenance | Search Issue | Next Page BMaGS E F
  17. 17. C Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Refer a Friend A Installation 7Maintenance | Search Issue | Next Page BMaGS E F Z-MAX™ Smart Plug Technology The S T O R M Z-MAX cords feature an exclusive RJ-45 has Arrived! Smart-Plug design which integrates a precisely tuned printed circuit board (PCB) into every plug. The PCB-based Smart Plug’s enhanced signal tuning is perfectly matched to the Z-MAX outlet, providing unparalleled end-to-end category 6A performance. Z-MAX™ Outlets Siemon’s Z-MAX outlet utilizes a patent- pending linear termination module to eliminate split and crossed pairs. This break- through optimizes performance consistency and removes a significant source of crosstalk present in all other RJ-45 outlets. Z-MAX work area outlets feature an exclusive hybrid flat/angled design that allows both flat and angled mounting orientations with the same outlet. Each Z-MAX outlet includes an innovative icon card containing four high visibility, two-sided printed icons for outlet The Siemon Structured identification and supplemental color coding. Cabling Revolution 60-Second Terminations with Z-MAX is an optimized end-to-end category 6A UTP and shielded system developed from the the Innovative Z-TOOL™ ground up shattering the limitations of the RJ-45 Used to terminate both UTP and shielded as we know it today. Z-MAX outlets, the Z-TOOL combines speed, simplicity and connection performance • Highest level of category 6A margin in the industry consistency in ergonomically-designed, for both UTP and shielded one-handed tool. • Simple termination process combines Best-in-Class High-Density Z-MAX ™ 60-second termination time with high performance Patch Panels consistency Z-MAX’s enhanced noise resistance in • Patented PCB-based Smart Plug technology brings both UTP and shielded Z-MAX systems unsurpassed performance optimization and repeata- enables ultra-high category 6A patching bility into the patch cord density up to 48 ports within 1U of rack or cabinet space. Field-terminated Z-MAX • Patented/patent-pending Zero-Cross outlet and outlets or Z-MAX pre-terminated trunking termination module eliminates pair crossing and pair cables can be quickly snapped into splitting to minimize internal and alien crosstalk Z-MAX patch panels, enabling rapid deployment. To learn more about other Z-MAX innovations, attend a Z-MAX™ webinar or view real time termination CONNECTING THE WORLD TO A HIGHER STANDARD videos visit, WWW.SIEMON.COM/US/ZMAX ____________________ W W W . S I E M O N . C O M _______________ C Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Refer a Friend A Installation 7Maintenance | Search Issue | Next Page BMaGS E F
  18. 18. C Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Refer a Friend A Installation 7Maintenance | Search Issue | Next Page BMaGS EF Install It Trace It Track It Superior Essex Just Made Installing Cable Easier! Introducing Superior Essex CableID, a new cable identification feature that is designed to: » Save time on new installations » Simplify cable identification to trace, add, move/change cable » Display a unique 4-character alpha numeric code every two feet on the cable jacket CableID is now standard on our CAT 5e, 6, and 6A product lines. Learn more about CableID and our copper product portfolio at www.SPSX.com/Comm/CableID © 2010 Superior Essex Inc. All Rights Reserved Toll Free 1.800.551.8948 | Fax 770.657.6807 | SuperiorEssex.com/Comm C Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Refer a Friend A Installation 7Maintenance | Search Issue | Next Page BMaGS EF
  19. 19. C Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Refer a Friend A Installation 7Maintenance | Search Issue | Next Page BMaGS E F :: TECHNOLOGY :: Bringing fiber-to-the-x technology into the enterprise space New York and industry-leading busi- nesses, Motorola explains. Its new Passive Optical LANs bring a track facility at the Stony Brook University record of outside-plant success. Research and Development Park pro- vides researchers with 100,000 square BY PATRICK McLAUGHLIN feet of additional lab space. The recent deployment of an all-opti- percent in five-year total cost of own- From carrier to enterprise cal local area network (LAN) at Stony ership over today’s traditional LAN In March 2010 ADC announced a Brook University in New York reflects architectures, including more than partnership with Verizon Business in what could become a trend of technol- 70 percent savings in the cost of ser- which the two organizations are offer- ogies developed for longer-haul met- vice agreements and 40 percent in ing all-optical LAN systems to fed- ropolitan area networks (MANs) and energy savings.” Those savings esti- eral customers in the United States. wide area networks (WANs) being mates are based on Motorola’s POL Verizon Business uses slightly different deployed in enterprise environments. being deployed in a three-story build- nomenclature than Motorola, calling Motorola (www.motorola.com) was ing with a total of 1,080 users, each the system it provides an Optical LAN the lead vendor in terms of publiciz- with one voice and one Ethernet data Solution (OLS). ing the Stony Brook installation. But port, and ubiquitous access to a Power Products including ADC’s Rapid two other providers, one ubiquitous in over Ethernet (PoE)-connected wire- Fiber system portfolio, its TrueNet the service provider space and another less LAN. cabling solutions and its RealFlex very familiar to both outside-plant “Motorola’s POL solution offers a products are part of the Verizon and LAN professionals, played signifi- compelling case to those looking to Business offering. cant roles in the Stony Brook project. achieve IT savings while expanding At that time ADC described the Verizon Business (www.verizonbusi- ____________ and simplifying their network,” accord- system and its technology as follows. ness.com) and ADC (www.adc.com) ______ ing to Joe Cozzolino, senior vice presi- “The OLS, which takes converged were instrumental in the deployment dent and general manager for Motorola services all the way to the desktop, and ADC reports that Stony Brook is Mobile Devices and Home. “We are uses the same passive optical net- one of several users choosing to imple- pleased to include our innovative POL work (PON) technology and prac- ment an all-optical LAN. solution in CEWIT’s advanced educa- tices that go into Verizon’s nationwide Motorola dubs the system Passive tional and research center.” fi ber-to-the-premises network. The Optical LAN (POL) and had this to CEWIT stands for the Center of OLS network’s Gigabit PON (GPON) say about the technology: “Motorola’s Excellence in Wireless and Information architecture means it can deliver full POL solution provides a great option Technology, which is the Stony Gigabit Ethernet service to each desk- for enterprises interested in signifi- Brook facility at which the POL was top and, with GPON’s sophisticated cant capital and operational cost sav- deployed. Established in 2003, CEWIT data-encryption capabilities, provide ings propelled by a greater than 50 is a partnership between the State of the secure transport of information www.cablinginstall.com Cabling Installation & Maintenance JULY 2010 17 C Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Refer a Friend A Installation 7Maintenance | Search Issue | Next Page BMaGS E F
  20. 20. C Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Refer a Friend A Installation 7Maintenance | Search Issue | Next Page BMaGS E F :: TECHNOLOGY :: between users. can provide data rates up to 25 tera- supporting users. It’s complicated, but ADC’s president of global connec- bits per second, Voice over Internet it’s a network we’ve gotten used to tivity solutions Pat O’Brien describes Protocol, and 2,000 video channel at over the years. the fit of his company’s systems into distances up to 12 miles over a single “When you have a multi-building the OLS suite. “When Verizon Business fi ber strand. But running singlemode environment, you multiply that com- came to us looking for next-generation fi ber to the desk? How realistic is that plexity. In an optical LAN GPON, a fi ber infrastructure to support its OLS for today’s network manager? And system has a 20-kilometer reach from solution for its federal customers, key how can it be labeled cost-effective optical line terminal to optical net- issues were cost, speed of installation when everyone in the cabling indus- work terminal. and quality. It also needed to man- try has heard time and time again that “The green aspects of it are unbe- age cable volumes easily and conserve long-wavelength optical transmis- lievable,” Kennedy adds. “We’ve seen space in the process. Our fi ber equip- sion over singlemode fi ber is the most nothing yet that’s a drawback in that ment helped Verizon Business address expensive option, head-and-shoulders regard. For example, a customer that is used to dealing with traditional LAN architectures will see significant A 700-user system can save up to energy savings. A 700-user system can save up to $100,000 a year in energy $100,000 a year in energy cost by cost. That’s year-over-year savings and is pretty dramatic.” using a Passive Optical LAN. He says that it took some users time to warm up to the idea. Those who these issues and provide a completely above short-wave optical transmission have always implemented traditional passive end-to-end green solution that via multimode fi ber and dwarfi ng elec- LAN architectures “were skeptical,” he enables customers to significantly trical transmission over twisted-pair states. Specifically with regard to the reduce power consumption and cool- media? high costs of a long-wavelength sin- ing costs of operating the network.” glemode-based LAN he notes, “Costs Adds Ed Hill, director of program Green equals green are making it more attractive. Users are management for Verizon Business, ADC business development man- able to do more things than ever before. “Our federal customers can see for ager Bryan Kennedy explains that the They can run a POTS line and Power themselves why our OLS offering is a idea is not so far-fetched when build- over Ethernet. In some cases it would true green solution that is secure, scal- ing space, campus environments, total take four horizontal multimode runs to able and can meet the needs of their cost of ownership and energy costs are do the job of one singlemode run. future networks. We want our cus- factored in. “Initially we saw interest “You have to look at total cost of tomers to understand how this solu- in the government space because of ownership,” he asserts. “As an exam- tion can help their agencies improve the security of the GPON system. But ple, if you’re using GPON today some- network efficiencies, enhance network it’s also good for colleges and universi- day you’ll have WDMPON [wavelength capacity and reduce capital costs.” ties. One reason is how attractive it is division multiplexing PON]. For OLS What is likely to be the most-foreign in campus environments, or even in a users, their infrastructure is in place for concept of the OLS/POL architecture multiple-floor single building. that with singlemode to the desktop.” for network managers within end-user “Workgroup switches on each floor While savings on energy costs can organizations is that it uses single- support horizontal cabling,” Kennedy be six-figure dramatic, Kennedy says mode fi ber all the way to the desktop. explains. “The 100-meter limit has other environmental-impact char- Verizon Business and ADC tout the lent itself to multiple closets on a floor, acteristics favor the OLS as well. fact that such a system theoretically with workgroup switch electronics “Cable weight and buildup is one 18 JULY 2010 Cabling Installation & Maintenance www.cablinginstall.com C Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Refer a Friend A Installation 7Maintenance | Search Issue | Next Page BMaGS E F
  21. 21. C Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Refer a Friend A Installation 7Maintenance | Search Issue | Next Page BMaGS EF :: TECHNOLOGY :: consideration. A network with 144 mul- “In the carrier space we have seen cases video services. It’s a natural timode fiber strands and Category 5 the PON architecture used primar- progression. twisted-pair cabling for voice connec- ily by vertically integrated carriers “The value that the technol- tivity is looking at 884 pounds of cable providing triple play,” he continues. ogy brings to the LAN space is based on 55-meter runs. Compare that “Contrast that with the LAN, which futureproofi ng, or the ability to eas- to a singlemode optical LAN, which has primarily been data. But now ily upgrade. It also provides lower has 182 pounds of cable,” for the same LANs are carrying VoIP and in some continued on page 22 number of 55-meter runs, he says. “There are space savings too. Two hundred fi fty users in a closet requires 150 square feet. With an optical LAN, you need 12 square feet. There’s also HVAC and UPS impact.” All these Revolutionary fusion factors translate to both space and connectors and splicer energy-consumption benefits when using the all-optical singlemode LAN within a building or campus. PON’s telco heritage Passive optical networks tradi- tionally have been deployed in car- rier or service-provider-type networks as opposed to customer-owned LAN environments, for many of the reasons F-3000™ LC, E-2000™ and SC Fusion described already. Kennedy provides a quick history lesson in the technology ➔ Advanced fusion splice technology ➔ Fast and user friendly field assembly and how it evolved as a service-pro- ➔ High reliability vider technology. ➔ No epoxy required “Early work on PON architec- tures started in the 1990s. The ITU [International Telecommunication Union] developed the APON stan- dard, which stood for Asynchronous Transfer Mode PON. A lot of carri- ers have deployed fi ber-to-the-node for some time, pushing fi ber deeper into the network. As fi ber increases ZEUS Fusion Splicer and prices come down, it is more ➔ High quality field termination of 1.25mm and 2.5mm worthwhile.” connectors and robust fiber splices for SM & MM Verizon’s FiOS program, Kennedy applications. ➔ Uneatable superiority will result when using the Zeus with points out, originated as a Broadband precision “V-groove” alignment and production quality field PON (BPON) system before quickly installable connectors. changing to GPON, both of which are also standards set by the ITU. DIAMOND SA Via de Patrizi 5 • CH-6616 Losone - Switzerland Tel. +41 91 785 45 45 • Fax +41 91 785 45 00 the fiber meeting _____________________ 19 C Previous Page | Contents | Zoom in | Zoom out | Refer a Friend A Installation 7Maintenance | Search Issue | Next Page BMaGS EF

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