Transgenerational     TraumaAnd the effects on our families and            communities              mm ities
Why is any of this           important?• M n of the problems we f ce in f milies and  Many          roblems     face famil...
What are some of the           effects?             ff• Addiction to alcohol and other subst nces                 lcohol n...
Initial observations• Ide s for this presentation t ken from  Ideas           resent tion taken  experience with the Nativ...
Definitions• The Native community defined the collective  trauma that occurred historically as the ‘soul  wound.’ This is ...
S       Serious concerns• The soul wound not onl gets passed from one                       only          ssed  generation...
Destruction of Culture                C• L ngu ge spirituality, sense of f mil  Language, s iritu lit           family  st...
Is this for real? What        evidence is there?           id      i h• There is a substantial bod of liter ture th t     ...
When the soul is wounded• Hum ns re ct with grief when wounded  Humans react                 wounded.• Humans remember the...
A traditional Native model          of t           f trauma• Tr um is a three-faceted wounding process.  Trauma     three ...
Soul wounding as sorcery…               is this going too far?               i hi      i       f ?• When the intent of the...
Western psychology also        knows this        k      hi• C rl Jung the Swiss psychiatrist theorized  Carl              ...
S              Seriously?                      y• It is well known th t most perpetrators h e                   that      ...
Internalized oppression…        identification i h h        id ifi i with the aggressor• E l psychoanalytic theory asserte...
S    Stockholm syndrome               y• Theor and observations h e shown th t  Theory nd obser tions have               t...
Internalized oppression in         present day life           e e td• M n of our communities h e become our  Many         ...
Violence gone inward               gWhen violence gets internalized we then see some of thefollowing:1. Add   Addictive be...
Where do we go from here?             g• Interventions must include socio historical factors as part of the               ...
Hopeful future               p• Community programs must insist on cultural competency                                     ...
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Transgenerational trauma

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Transgenerational Trauma

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Transgenerational trauma

  1. 1. Transgenerational TraumaAnd the effects on our families and communities mm ities
  2. 2. Why is any of this important?• M n of the problems we f ce in f milies and Many roblems face families nd communities can be directly linked to the soul wound/transgenerational trauma.• Each generation that doesn’t deal with this merely passes th t l the trauma effects t th next ff t to the t generation.
  3. 3. What are some of the effects? ff• Addiction to alcohol and other subst nces lcohol nd substances. Alcohol serves as a substitute for the removal of culture and spiritual practice.• Violence in the family and community because the i l th violence th t caused th t that d the trauma i passed is d on and acted out presently.
  4. 4. Initial observations• Ide s for this presentation t ken from Ideas resent tion taken experience with the Native American community.• The issues found in the Native community are also f l found in th Af i d i the African A i American, L ti Latino, and other communities in our society.• Trauma and injury bring similar responses among human beings, and the effects of trauma also b l bring similar responses in all people who l ll l h are subjected to it.
  5. 5. Definitions• The Native community defined the collective trauma that occurred historically as the ‘soul wound.’ This is also known as transgenerationall trauma.• Transgenerational trauma is the trauma that is T g passed from one generation to the next if the trauma is not resolved within the generation in which it occurs. hi h• Effects of transgenerational trauma are also passed on if not resolved. d f l d
  6. 6. S Serious concerns• The soul wound not onl gets passed from one only ssed generation to the next if not resolved…it is also cumulative. That is to say that a person who has not experienced trauma personally may still carry a serious amount of inherited trauma from y their ancestors.• The trauma inflicted on Native people was also directed at the removal and destruction of culture.
  7. 7. Destruction of Culture C• L ngu ge spirituality, sense of f mil Language, s iritu lit family structure were systematically destroyed.• Boarding schools were a place that systematically attempted to destroy the family system and the sense of f il t d th f family.• The destruction of culture left many p p y people empty and searching for their soul.
  8. 8. Is this for real? What evidence is there? id i h• There is a substantial bod of liter ture th t subst nti l body literature that substantiates the soul wound.• General trauma theory gives ample evidence to the theoretical construct of soul wound/transgenerational t d/t ti l trauma.• In addition, many y y years of clinical experience p lend further evidence that this is a valid construct.
  9. 9. When the soul is wounded• Hum ns re ct with grief when wounded Humans react wounded.• Humans remember the wounding and it continues to hurt.• Humans react to healing when healing is available.
  10. 10. A traditional Native model of t f trauma• Tr um is a three-faceted wounding process. Trauma three f ceted rocess• It wounds the body. The body has self-healing y y mechanisms that go into effect when traumatized.• The mind requires special healing methods.• Th soull is usually lleft without h l in most The ll f h healing therapeutic circles.
  11. 11. Soul wounding as sorcery… is this going too far? i hi i f ?• When the intent of the perpetrator is focused er etr tor on the victim, the intent can be seen as evil since it is intended to cause pain.• Native psychology teaches that such actions on th part of th perpetrator lit ll ‘ h t ’ the t f the t t literally ‘shoots’ part of the perpetrator into the victim. This energy festers and causes the perpetrator s perpetrator’s energy to gain life in the victim.
  12. 12. Western psychology also knows this k hi• C rl Jung the Swiss psychiatrist theorized Carl s chi trist that if an issue ‘complex’ does not get resolved it then creates of a life of its own in the unconscious.• Th unconscious conflict will th result i The i fli t ill then lt in symptoms as the unconscious tries to get the person to resolve the injury injury.
  13. 13. S Seriously? y• It is well known th t most perpetrators h e that er etr tors have been victims themselves.• Having been a victim pre-disposes the person to become a perpetrator…the vampire syndrome. d• Vampire mythology offers a model of how this p y gy works.
  14. 14. Internalized oppression… identification i h h id ifi i with the aggressor• E l psychoanalytic theory asserted the Early h l i h d h phenomenon of identification with the aggressor. aggressor• Trauma predisposes victims to become aggressors.
  15. 15. S Stockholm syndrome y• Theor and observations h e shown th t Theory nd obser tions have that victims in an oppressive situation will began to act like the aggressors especially if the aggressor rewards the behavior.• At times victims b ti i ti become more b t l th th brutal than the aggressor.
  16. 16. Internalized oppression in present day life e e td• M n of our communities h e become our Many have own enemies…via self-destructive behaviors.• Much of the oppression becomes internalized and acted out as violence towards the family and community (i d d it (i.e., domestic violence, violence ti i l i l towards our own community).
  17. 17. Violence gone inward gWhen violence gets internalized we then see some of thefollowing:1. Add Addictive behaviors b h2. Depression/suicidal ideation3. Chronic h i l3 Ch i physical problems such as di b t h bl h diabetes, hypertension t i These life conditions can be interpreted as violence towards one’s self.4. Loss of identity making it easier to commit violence towards one’s self or the ones closest to us.
  18. 18. Where do we go from here? g• Interventions must include socio historical factors as part of the socio-historical treatment, prevention and education.• The person, family and/or community will feel that they are p defective if the h d f f h historical issues are not made part of their l d f h awareness.• Awareness begins the process of re-inventing a new identity via a new narrative.• We no longer need to become and be the stereotype that has g yp been placed on us, i.e., d k Indian, violent and scary person, b l d drunken I d l d etc.• Re inventing individuals leads to re inventing families and Re-inventing re-inventing communities.
  19. 19. Hopeful future p• Community programs must insist on cultural competency competency, otherwise the false identity continues to be reinforced because the intervention is not from the community’s belief system.• People working in the community must know and demonstrate that they have competency to work in the community.• Transgenerational trauma must be addressed by providers and they must take responsibility for their part in this history.• N theory construction must b part of the work as well as New h be f h k ll getting funding sources to become more culturally competent.

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