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New Media In The Jerry Brown Campaign
 

New Media In The Jerry Brown Campaign

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How California's governor successfully reached voters in his 2010 campaign using digital channels and limited resources.

How California's governor successfully reached voters in his 2010 campaign using digital channels and limited resources.

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    New Media In The Jerry Brown Campaign New Media In The Jerry Brown Campaign Presentation Transcript

    • Case
Study:
New
Media
in
the
Jerry
Brown
for
Governor
Campaign
How
California’s
Governor‐Elect
Successfully
 Reached
Voters
Through
Digital
Channels

    • SITUATION  Jerry
Brown
faced
an
opponent
whose
unlimited
 resources
extended
to
her
 new
media
efforts.

 It
seemed
she
was
willing
 to
pour
as
much
money
as
 possible
into
her
online
 programs—no
website
 went
without
a
banner
ad,
 no
Google
search
item
without
a
sponsored
result.



    • CHALLENGE Using
limited
resources

and
an
even
more
limited
new
media
budget,
how
would
the
campaign
engage
Jerry
Brown’s
supporters
and
spread
his
messages
through
the
digital
space…
without
being
hammered
by
opposiOon
noise?

    • SOLUTION Take
advantage
of
free
tools
and
creaOve
means

 to
bring
Jerry’s
disOnct
personality
and

 years
of
experience
to
life
online.



    • Jerry’s
Facebook
page
acted
as
a
hub
for
fans
to
hear
 campaign
news,
share
media,
read
short
messages
 from
the
candidate,
and
interact
with
one
other.



    • Widgets
like
badges,
donated
statuses,
and
polls
kept
users
 engaged,
allowed
them
to
publicly
express
their
support,
 and
introduced
others
in
their
networks
to
Jerry.

    • Those
who
already
didn’t
 “like”
Jerry
automaOcally
 redirected
to
a
video
 introducing
them
to
the
candidate.
Users
could
also
click
the
“Vote
Jerry”
tab
to
 sign
up
to
help
the
 campaign
efforts
directly.

    • The
“SoluOons”
tab
 showed
users
Jerry’s
 plans
for
California
 without
leaving
 Facebook.
 Specific
demographics
and
interest
 groups
formed
individual
pages,
 featured
on
Jerry’s
main
page—everyone
from
Moms
to
Students
to
 Republicans
for
Jerry
Brown.


    • CreaOng
Facebook
event
pages
for
upcoming
campaign
events
and
volunteer
opportuniOes
generated
excitement
 among
supporters,
who
could
RSVP,
find
important
 informaOon,
and
interact
on
the
event
wall.

    • Photo
galleries
of
campaign
stops
 and
other
behind‐the‐scenes
imagery
lived
on
the
“Photos”
tab.
 Users
were
encouraged
to
post
 their
own
pictures
to
Jerry’s
wall
 that
answered
the
quesOon,

 “How
do
YOU
say
Jerry?”

    • Without
any
paid
adverOsing
 whatsoever,
these
tacOcs
 helped
Jerry
organically
 generate
more
than

 one
hundred
thousand
 Facebook
fans.

    • Jerry
generated
more
than
one
million
followers
on
Twi[er.
 Always
privy
to
emerging
trends,
he
visited
the
Twi[er
 headquarters
early
on
in
his
campaign,
resulOng
in
his
 addiOon
to
the
“suggested
users”
list.

 InteracOng
with
other
Twi[er
users
enhanced
the
 experience
for
his
followers.


    • Jerry’s
Twi[er
account
was
so
unique,
it
a[racted
the
a[enOon
of
the
Los Angeles Times,
which
encouraged
its
 readers
to
visit
his
profile.

 Certain
tweets
were
also
read
during
news
casts.

    • Jerry’s
Flickr
account
visually
chronicled
a
mix
of
campaign
 happenings,
volunteer
work
in
the
field,
and
fun
imagery
 from
Jerry’s
past.
Users
were
encouraged
to
submit
their
 own
photos
to
Jerry’s
Flickr
stream
by
uploading
and
 tagging
their
pictures
“jerrybrown2010.”
Images
were
a
 downloadable
resource
for
anyone
who
wanted
them.




    • The
design
contest
was
a
collaboraOve
and
a[enOon‐ garnering
use
of
social
media
and
Flickr.

 ArOsts
were
encouraged
to
submit
designs
for
a
new
campaign
logo
by
uploading
and
tagging
their
submissions
 on
Flickr.
Users
then
voted
on
their
favorite.

 The
winning
graphic
was
sold
as
a
t‐shirt
in
Jerry’s
online
 store
and
used
in
various
pieces
of
campaign
collateral.

    • Jerry’s
YouTube
account
housed
a
collecOon
of
viral
videos,
 including
first‐releases
of
every
TV
commercial.

 We
cross‐promoted
videos
on
all
other
social
media
 channels
and
in
press
releases.
 Due
to
easy
sharing
and
enabled
commenOng,
our

 “Meg
Whitman:
Why
I
came
to
California”
commercial
 earned
close
to
500,000
views—unprecedented
for
an
 online
campaign
ad.

    • A
series
of
“Social
Media
Webisodes”
were
also
seeded
on
 the
YouTube
page
as
a
resource.
The
two‐minute
long
episodes
taught
Jerry’s
support
base
how
to
best
use
online
 tools
available
to
them
to
help
the
campaign
efforts.


    • The
campaign
blog
provided
an
arena
to
showcase
Jerry’s
 efforts
through
an
authenOc,
inside
voice
disOnguished
 from
press
releases.
Its
large
readership
regularly
commented
on
posts,
which
were
published
at
least
once
 a
day
and
ranged
from
volunteer
opportuniOes
to
policy
 breakdowns
to
stories
from
the
campaign
trail.


    • Blog
posts
extended
to
The
Huffington
Post,
so
our
message
spread
to
a
wider
audience
than
Jerry
Brown
 supporters.
Our
new
media
team
maintained
a
good
relaOonship
with
other
prominent
bloggers,
who
ocen
 reached
out
to
the
campaign
for
resources.



    • One
of
the
things
that
disOnguished
Jerry
from
his
 opponent
was
her
conOnuous
disregard
for
the
truth.

 To
chronicle
this,
the
campaign
created
Meg‐a‐Myths,

a
website
that
kept
track
of
and
debunked
the
lies
told.
We
built
the
whole
site
using
Wordpress,
an
inexpensive
 and
easy
pladorm.


    • Meg‐a‐Myths
quickly
evolved
from
a
website
into
its
own
brand.
Users
could
follow
Meg‐a‐Myths
on
Twi[er
and
fan
 it
on
Facebook.
Readers
submi[ed
their
own
myths
and
 signed
up
for
the
“truly
perplexing
Myth
Mail.”

 Meg‐a‐Myths
flip
flops
even
sold
in
Jerry’s
online
store.

    • Those
interested
in
acOvely
helping
with
the
campaign
 efforts
were
encouraged
to
create
a
profile
on
 my.jerrybrown.org,
our
online
volunteer
network.
 My.jerrybrown.org
users
could
connect
with
one
another,
create
groups
for
local
supporters
in
their
area,
plan
events,
 and
set
up
their
own
personal
fundraising
pages.


    • Throughout
the
campaign,
we
steadily
gained
supporters
through
email
subscripOons,
ending
up
with
a
list
of
430,000.
 In
an
effort
to
gain
more
subscribers
and
donaOons,
email
 blasts
were
mirrored
on
Facebook
and
Twi[er.

 We
surpassed
our
online
fundraising
goal,
earning
$2.8
 million
in
digital
donaOons.

    • Social
media
accounts
centralized
 on
Jerry’s
campaign
homepage,
 jerrybrown.org.

 Visitors
could
easily
access
his
 various
profiles
and
connect
 directly
from
one
simple
online
 hub
(we
even
linked
Jerry’s
 MySpace
and
LinkedIn
profiles).

 Users
could
also
connect
with
 their
Facebook
and
Twi[er
 accounts
to
“like”
and
tweet
 content
directly
from
 jerrybrown.org.

    • CONCLUSION  By
taking
advantage
of
free
or
inexpensive
tools
and
bringing
 Jerry
to
life
through
his
digital
 channels,
the
online
audience
 experienced
not
only
a
 candidate,
but
a
real
person.
 
AuthenOcity
and
creaOvity
were
a
winning
combinaOon— not
only
on
the
Internet,
but
 also
in
the
voOng
booth.




    • Thank
you!