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Fallacies - McPherson
Fallacies - McPherson
Fallacies - McPherson
Fallacies - McPherson
Fallacies - McPherson
Fallacies - McPherson
Fallacies - McPherson
Fallacies - McPherson
Fallacies - McPherson
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Fallacies - McPherson

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  • 1. +
  • 2. + Preview of Chapter  What is a fallacy?  Typesof Fallacies: Logical, Ethos and Pathos.  What are Logical Fallacies?  What are Ethos?  What are Pathos  How are fallacies used in the process of communication?
  • 3. + WHAT IS A FALLACY? A Fallacy is a deceptive, misleading, or false notion, belief, etc.: “The world was flat” was at one time a popular fallacy.
  • 4. + Logical Fallacies  Begging the Question A Red Herring  Non sequitur  Straw Man.  Stacked Evidence.  Either-Or  Post Hoc  Hasty Generalization
  • 5. + Logical Fallacies Begging the Question:  demonstrates a conclusion by means of premises that assume that conclusion.Ex. Aspirin users are at risk of becoming dependent on the drug, because aspirin is an addictive substance A Red Herring:  provides irrelevant and misleading support that pulls the audience away from the real argumentEx. We admit that gay marriage is an unchangeable tendency, but this issue is ridiculous. Non Sequitur:  incorrectly assumes one thing is the cause of anotherEx. I hear the rain falling; therefore, there’s no game.
  • 6. + Logical Fallacies Straw Man:  when an individual ignores the other’s position and replaces it with distorted arguments in order to misrepresent the opponent’s position.Ex. Have you stopped beating your kids? Stacked Evidence:  represents only one side of an issue, therefore distorting the argument.Ex. Dogs are superior than cats because they are smarter and loyal. Either-Or:  reduce complicated issues to only two possible courses of action.Ex. Barack Obama either creates an immigration reform or he say goodbye to the Latino vote.
  • 7. + Logical Fallacies  Faulty Casualty: (Post Hoc)  Talking about an event or situation to create confusion that it caused the point of argument. Ex. After the Red Sox fired Bobby Valentine, they never won another World Series.  Hasty Generalization:  drawing conclusions from very little or not enough evidence. Ex. I wouldn’t go to a Yankees’ game, the only time I went there people were rude to me.
  • 8. + How are fallacies used in the communication process?  Not rhetorically intended to appeal to reason but rather to emotion, or to create more sensitive disposition.  Fallacies are used to win arguments.
  • 9. + What we learned…  We learned the definition of fallacies  We identified the different logical fallacies  Begging the Question  A Red Herring  Non sequitur  Straw Man.  Stacked Evidence.  Either-Or  Faulty Casualty  Hasty Generalization  We stated the function of fallacies in the process of communication.

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