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Sociology 10000 syllabus fall 2013
 

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    Sociology 10000 syllabus fall 2013 Sociology 10000 syllabus fall 2013 Document Transcript

    • BE SURE TO PRINT A COPY OF THIS SYLLABUS. YOU WILL NEED TO RETURN TO IT OFTEN OVER THE COURSE OF THIS SEMESTER. 1 Sociology 10000: Introduction to Sociology ONLINE via Blackboard Learn Fall 2013 at Purdue University North Central PROFESSOR: Dr. Carla A. Pfeffer OFFICE ADDRESS: Schwarz 30G OFFICE TELEPHONE: (219) 785-5264 EMAIL: Please send all course-related correspondence via Blackboard Learn Mail. In an emergency, or if the Blackboard Learn system is down/you cannot access the system, you may contact me at cpfeffer@pnc.edu or cpfeffer@umich.edu. OFFICE HOURS: Mondays and Wednesdays 12-2pm (or by appointment) COURSE DESCRIPTION: Sociology is a social science seeking to better understand how individuals, groups, social systems/structures and cultures shape (and are shaped by) one another. Some of the social institutions we will study include race, gender, class, sexuality, religion, politics, the family and education. A primary goal of this course is to introduce you to the perspectives, research methods and empirical findings of sociology. Equally important is the goal of cultivating your skills for analyzing the social situations and events that you encounter in your everyday lives. Throughout this course, emphasis will be placed on developing critical and integrative ways of thinking about sociology, social processes and their relevance to everyday life. COURSE GOALS: After completing this course, you should be able to: • further develop analytical and critical thinking skills necessary to better understand view complex social situations. • distinguish sociology from other social sciences and professional disciplines (e.g., psychology and social work). • understand and apply the concept of the “sociological imagination.” • understand the key sociological theories (e.g., structural functionalism, social conflict theory and symbolic interactionism) and how they influence our views of the world. • examine their values, attitudes and relationships to other people ,of differingent backgrounds and experiences (with regard to race, ethnicity, age, gender, sexual orientation, etc.). ethnic, racial and/or gender groupings. • describe and understand the methods that sociologists use to study the social world. • name at least five key figures in the development of sociology, including those who are well-known and those who are not as well-known. • formulate critical and analytic responses to media depictions of social processes and events (including social values and social norms). • distinguish “folk wisdom” from empirical evidence, with the ability to analyze and critique each form of knowledge. • better understand the ways in which race, gender, class, sexuality, age, ability and other factors shape the experiences of individuals and groups. • describe social and cultural factors and processes that lead to both social stratification and social/cultural change.
    • BE SURE TO PRINT A COPY OF THIS SYLLABUS. YOU WILL NEED TO RETURN TO IT OFTEN OVER THE COURSE OF THIS SEMESTER. 2 SOME NOTES ABOUT THIS ONLINE COURSE: This is a fully online course. This means that we do not meet in class and you are responsible for completing all instruction online. Online courses are a unique format of instruction and are not “easier” than traditional format courses; they are not appropriate for all learners. If you have difficulty managing your own time or working/studying independently, you may wish to enroll for a non-online or hybrid (which blends traditional and online instruction) version of this course. The reading expectations for this course are reasonable (approximately 35 pages/week), but you will be asked to read this material closely and carefully. It is critical, for your success in the course, to make sure that you keep up with the readings so as not to fall behind. PowerPoint slides will be available to you for each week of instruction and you should review these slides (and even print and make notes on them if that is useful to you) for each chapter. You should feel free to utilize office hours whenever you would like face-to-face instruction or have questions about the course materials that would be best answered in person. This class is heavily oriented toward online class discussion of central course concepts, as well as integration of media resources that exemplify course concepts. You are expected to master the material presented in the readings, PowerPoint slides, media resources and online class discussions. You will also have chapter quizzes and learning assignments and activities each week that will help you study and prepare for the exams. A host of learning and study tools (digital flash cards, audio chapter in review summaries, study plans, blog links, learning videos, etc.) are available for each of the chapters. Your success in this course will depend on carefully reading all assigned chapters, actively participating in online class discussions and using the array of learning/study tools and activities that are available to you. You should also always feel free to ask questions, or for clarification, when material is unclear. BLACKBOARD LEARN: You will be using Blackboard Learn extensively in this course and your access to a reliable and fast internet connection, several times each week, is essential to your success. You will access all course-related materials directly from the Blackboard Learn site for our class. You will always have access to the syllabus, course assignments, your grades, and lecture slides via Blackboard Learn. This system does occasionally crash and, in those instances, you may contact me directly at cpfeffer@pnc.edu or cpfeffer@umich.edu. • Download and Install the Mozilla Firefox Web Browser (http://www.mozilla.org/en- US/firefox/new/) on your computer and try to ONLY use the Firefox browser to access Blackboard Learn. • Blackboard Learn functions on Eastern Standard Time. Be sure to follow the syllabus timelines. If a paper is due at 10pm on the syllabus, the online system will report the due date as 11pm. The paper is actually due at 10pm Central Standard Time and must be submitted by that time in order to earn credit. • THE BLACKBOARD LEARN SYSTEM TIMES OUT EVERY NINETY MINUTES AND YOU WILL LOSE YOUR WORK IF YOU ARE AUTOMATICALLY LOGGED OUT AND HAVE NOT SAVED WHAT YOU ARE WORKING ON—SAVE YOUR WORK OFTEN!!! • For any technological issues that you are experiencing with Blackboard Learn, please contact Information Services directly at (219) 785-5511 or visit http://www.pnc.edu/distance/studentsupport.html
    • BE SURE TO PRINT A COPY OF THIS SYLLABUS. YOU WILL NEED TO RETURN TO IT OFTEN OVER THE COURSE OF THIS SEMESTER. 3 We will be depending upon technology for this course. That said, you must establish a contingency plan now—a back-up plan for when something goes wrong with your electricity, computer, Internet, etc. We all have to deal with technological hiccups. If something goes wrong, complete your assignments at a neighbor's, friend's, local library, coffee shop, or at on-campus lab. No technology excuses will be accepted. In the event that Blackboard Learn crashes during a testing or assignment submission period, deadlines may be extended. Keep an eye on the Announcements tab in this event. REQUIRED TEXTBOOK: The Real World: An Introduction to Sociology (3rd Edition; 2011) by Kerry Ferris and Jill Stein ISBN: 978-0-393-91217-3. Two copies of the textbook are on 2-hour loan at the PNC Library. EMAIL ETIQUETTE: Whenever you are addressing an email to someone other than a good friend, you need to follow basic email etiquette. This means that you should have a proper greeting (Hello Professor Pfeffer, etc.), a message body that follows the rules of Standard Written English (capitalization, spelling, grammar and mechanics, etc), and a closing (“Thank you for your help,” or “Thank you for your time”). It is always polite to thank the person for reading the email and trying to assist you. Also, be sure to sign the email with your own first and last name. The subject line of your email should be clear and formal. Messages that do not follow this format will not be read. ACCOMMODATIONS: Purdue University North Central is committed to providing all students equal access to learning opportunities. Students with a documented disability that either prevents them from fully participating in any aspect of this course, or that requires an accommodation should contact me within the first two weeks of this course. Students who have self-identified and who have appropriate documentation (from a medical professional) that has been verified through the PNC Disability Services Coordinator (located in LSF 103 or by phone at 219-785-5374), will be given accommodations for this course. It is the student's responsibility to request an accommodation and schedule their exams with the Student Success Center, the Disability Services Coordinator, or me. ACADEMIC DISHONESTY: Cases of academic dishonesty (including cheating on quizzes, submitting someone else’s work as your own, submitting work that you have submitted for another class for this class, or plagiarizing by failing to give proper credit when incorporating the work of others in your written submissions) will result in a score of zero for the quiz or paper in question and may also result in a student receiving an “F” for the entire course. When you copy our textbook authors’ exact words or phrases, directly from the book and without using quotation marks or citing page numbers, you are committing plagiarism. Remember, I am able to Google the same things you are able to Google. I am also able to note changes in the “voice” of your essays and to cut and paste sections of what you have written into Google to see if the passage is your own creation or someone else’s. I take academic cheating VERY seriously. All cases of academic dishonesty will be formally reported to the Dean of Students, John Weber. For more information about plagiarism and academic dishonesty, see: www.pnc.edu/engl/plagiarism.html
    • BE SURE TO PRINT A COPY OF THIS SYLLABUS. YOU WILL NEED TO RETURN TO IT OFTEN OVER THE COURSE OF THIS SEMESTER. 4 COURSE EVALUATIONS: Just as you will be evaluated for your performance in this course, your evaluations of my performance as an instructor are a critical way for you to help me improve the course. I will ask for anonymous midterm feedback online and also request that you complete your end-of- semester course evaluations through Digital Measures here: https://www.digitalmeasures.com/login/pnc/student/authentication/showLogin.do COURSE PERFORMANCE EVALUATION AND GRADING GRADING SUMMARY: Your final grade in this course is based on your achievements on course requirements as follows: Exams (10% each, 4 exams over the term) 40% Weekly Chapter Quizzes 20% Chapter Analysis and Reflection Papers (10% each, 2 papers due over term) 20% Active Participation 20% TOTAL 100% GRADING SCALE: (Final letter grades based on standard percentages, not curves, as follows): 97 -100% ...A+ 93 - 96% ... A 90 - 92% ... A- <60% ... F 87 - 89% ... B+ 83 - 86% ... B 80 - 82% ... B- Those who receive this course 77 - 79% ... C+ 73 - 76% ... C 70 - 72% ... C- grade will not receive credit 67 - 69% ... D+ 63 - 66% ... D 60 - 62% ... D- for taking the course. THE DETAILS ABOUT GRADES / FREQUENTLY-ASKED QUESTIONS (FAQ) EXAMS How many exams will I take in this course and how much of my grade is each exam worth? HHoThere are four online exams in this course. Each exam is worth 10% of your final grade in the course (so exams comprise 40% of your final grade in the course). What is the format of the exams? Each exam will contain fifty multiple-choice questions from material presented in the readings, PowerPoint Chapter in Review lectures, media resources and online class discussions. You will have two hours to answer the fifty questions. SAVE ALL OF YOUR EXAM ANSWERS AS YOU WORK! THE BLACKBOARD LEARN SYSTEM TIMES OUT EVERY NINETY MINUTES AND YOU WILL LOSE YOUR WORK IF YOU ARE LOGGED OUT!!! Are the exams cumulative? No, the exams are non-cumulative. Each exam covers four chapters except for the fourth exam, which covers only three (we are skipping Chapter 13). When will I take the exams? Exams will be held online according to the following schedule: Exam 1: Available online Friday Sep 20th at 10am - Sunday Sep 22nd at 10pm. Exam 2: Available online Friday Oct 18th at 10am - Sunday Oct 20th at 10pm. Exam 3: Available online Friday Nov 15th at 10am - Sunday Nov 17th at 10pm. Exam 4: Available online Friday Dec 13th at 10am - FRIDAY Dec 20th at 10pm.
    • BE SURE TO PRINT A COPY OF THIS SYLLABUS. YOU WILL NEED TO RETURN TO IT OFTEN OVER THE COURSE OF THIS SEMESTER. 5 How do I take the exams? You will access each exam under the “Assignments and Tests” tab under the appropriate Module week in Blackboard Learn. Extensions will not be granted for technological issues or troubles with internet access—so be sure to take the exam as early as possible during the exam period in case you encounter technological difficulties. Please contact Information Services at (219) 785-5511 if you do encounter any technological difficulties. You will have only one chance to take each exam. You cannot start the exam and then finish it later. You will have two hours to complete each exam. What if I miss taking an exam? Make-up exams will not be given. Exceptions to this rule are made only in dire, unavoidable circumstances (e.g., serious illness or emergency) that are fully documented (e.g., with official correspondence from physicians) and preferably with advance arrangements made directly with the instructor. Make-up exams, when offered, are essay exams. Again, technological difficulties do not constitute an adequate excuse for missing an exam, so be sure to take the exam early enough in the exam period to ensure that you are able to resolve any potential technological issues before your examination period expires. How can I raise my exam scores and what are these chapter quizzes all about? I have created a chapter quiz for you to take each week under the “Assignments and Tests” link under the Module for each week. The quizzes consist of twenty multiple- choice questions. Taking these quizzes will help you to develop a better sense of the information about which you’re still unclear for each chapter. Once you discern where your weak spots are, you can devote more time to studying those sections of the chapter. The links to the weekly quizzes will disappear the morning that your exam (covering those chapters) is posted. CHAPTER QUIZZES How many chapter quizzes will I take and how much of my grade are they each worth? HHoThere are fifteen chapter quizzes in this course. You will receive 1% of course credit for each quiz that you complete. If you complete and pass (receiving a score of 60% or greater) all fifteen quizzes, you will receive an additional 5% bonus. Not completing or not passing even one of the quizzes means that you are not eligible to receive this bonus. Weekly quizzes, therefore, are worth up to 20% of your final grade. What is the format of the chapter quizzes? Chapter quizzes will contain twenty multiple-choice questions from the material presented in the textbook. All chapter quizzes will be completed online and will be posted to the Assignments and Tests link under the Module for each chapter on Blackboard Learn. You may take each quiz as many times as you would like and the grade book will record only your highest score. Are the chapter quizzes cumulative and when will I take them? No, each quiz covers only one chapter You may take each quiz an unlimited number of times, but you must complete each chapter quiz prior to the day that the exam covering that chapter is released. So, for example, you must take each of the chapter quizzes over chapters 1-4 by September 19th (prior to the release of the first exam on September 20th) . Ideally, you should take each chapter quiz no later than Sunday at 10pm on the week we cover that particular chapter.
    • BE SURE TO PRINT A COPY OF THIS SYLLABUS. YOU WILL NEED TO RETURN TO IT OFTEN OVER THE COURSE OF THIS SEMESTER. 6 What if I miss taking a chapter quiz? Make-up quizzes will not be permitted. Exceptions to this rule are made only in dire, unavoidable circumstances (e.g., hospitalization) that are fully documented (e.g., with official correspondence from physicians) and preferably with advance arrangements made directly with the instructor. Technological difficulties do not constitute an adequate excuse for missing a chapter quiz, so be sure to take each quiz early enough to ensure that you are able to resolve any potential technological issues should they arise. In order to receive the full 20% for chapter quizzes, you must complete and pass ALL fifteen chapter quizzes. Missing or failing even one chapter quiz will reduce your total points possible on quizzes to 14% or less. How can I raise my exam scores? TAKE AND PASS EVERY SINGLE CHAPTER QUIZ! Be sure to use the interactive studying tools that are posted for each chapter ONLINE CHAPTER ANALYSIS AND REFLECTION PAPERS What are Chapter Analysis and Reflection Papers? Chapter Analysis and Reflection papers provide an opportunity for you to analyze and reflect on the course materials for a week. They also provide a way for me to ensure that you are completing your readings in a timely fashion. Because they are posted to the Discussion portion of Blackboard Learn, they also provide another opportunity for students to interact with one another as well as to encounter differing perspectives and opinions on the class materials. In these papers, I am not looking for lists or word-for- word recounting of what your textbook author had to say. Instead, I am looking for essays that critically analyze and reflect on the materials. How much of my grade are they worth and how many do I have to submit? Chapter Analysis and Reflection papers are worth 20% of your final grade for this course and you must write a total of TWO papers over the course of our 16-week semester. This means that you will get to choose which papers you will write. You must, however, submit your first paper during the first half (weeks 1-8) of the course and your second paper during the second half (weeks 9-16) of the course. Each Chapter Analysis and Reflection Paper is worth 10% of your final grade. Your papers will each be scored from 0-10 points, depending on how well they demonstrate critical analysis and reflection on that week’s materials. If you receive a low score on a paper, you may revise and resubmit your paper for regarding within one week of receiving your score. You will submit this revised paper via Bb Learn Mail attachment. Alternately, you may submit more than two papers and I will drop your lowest score(s). You may revise and/or submit as many papers as you like, earning up to a total of 20/20 for the paper component of your final grade. When are Critical Analysis and Reflection Papers due? You must submit each reflection paper online no later than SUNDAY at 10pm for the week under study. For example, if I wish to post a Critical Analysis and Reflection Paper on the material from week 1 (Chapter 1), I must submit that paper no later than 10pm on Sunday September 1st . You must submit your first paper during the first half of the course (weeks 1-8) and your second paper during the second half of the course (weeks 9-16).
    • BE SURE TO PRINT A COPY OF THIS SYLLABUS. YOU WILL NEED TO RETURN TO IT OFTEN OVER THE COURSE OF THIS SEMESTER. 7 How do I submit my papers? These critical analysis and reflection papers should be posted under the “Assignments and Tests” link for the appropriate week on Blackboard Learn. Write and save your paper in Word or Works and then post it as an attachment so that it is easy for me to read. You will be submitting your papers through the SafeAssign system, which is a plagiarism detection software program; so be sure that the work you submit is original and all your own. When submitting a revision of a paper, you will submit that paper via Blackboard Mail as an attachment. What should these papers be about? Each Critical Analysis and Reflection Paper should incorporate your analysis of the readings, online discussion and/or media and online learning resources covered that week. It is very obvious when students have not read the material closely and carefully (or have only skimmed the chapter). Each paper should offer a critical summary of many of the theories, ideas, terms, and concepts discussed in the textbook and the PowerPoint Review slides for that week. YOU MUST DISCUSS AND EXPLAIN THESE IDEAS, CONCEPTS, THEORIES, AND THEORISTS IN YOUR OWN WORDS. Copying the textbook authors’ words is both inadequate and may constitute plagiarism. Always use quotation marks and citations to page numbers whenever using the exact language or a quote from the text. And, whenever possible, work to describe these ideas in your own words and using your own unique examples rather than those from the text. I want these papers to demonstrate that you really understand what it is that the material for that week is all about. You don’t have to cover every single term, idea, theory, or theorist covered in the chapter for that week—but do be sure to capture a broad cross-section of the chapter’s materials, from start to finish. It may be helpful to use bold font to highlight the key terms, ideas, and concepts that you’re discussing from the text. The reflection part of this paper is that you must also bring in examples from your life and/or the news/real world/Learning Activities to demonstrate these course theories, ideas, terms and concepts. Please do avail yourselves of the resources provided by the Student Writing Center. You may make an appointment for assistance in writing course papers by calling (219) 785-5383 or visiting LSF 211. There are helpful writing support links and a grading rubric for papers posted on our Blackboard Learn site. What format should I use for my papers? Your papers should be single-spaced, 2 FULL pages, 1-inch margins, and in 12-pt. Times New Roman font. Proofread and spell check your work prior to submission. Most papers that receive full credit demonstrate close engagement with a substantial portion of the material covered across the chapter and are well written and clear. You will receive zero credit for papers that are not at least two full pages, according to the guidelines, above. Do not use fancy spacing or large headers with your name/date/class/assignment to take up space. What if I miss a paper? Late papers will receive zero credit and there are no makeup papers. However, you are only required to submit two papers over the course of the semester and you may revise and/or submit as many papers as you like. I will drop your lowest scores and keep your highest scores, up to 20/20 points.
    • BE SURE TO PRINT A COPY OF THIS SYLLABUS. YOU WILL NEED TO RETURN TO IT OFTEN OVER THE COURSE OF THIS SEMESTER. 8 ACTIVE PARTICIPATION: What is Active Participation? Despite the fact that this is a fully online class, you will be required to actively participate in class discussions on the course materials by responding on the discussion board to questions associated with the Learning Activity for each chapter. This is a 3-credit course. Think about the 3-credit courses that you take in a traditional sixteen-week format; you usually spend about 2.5-3 hours per week sitting in a classroom chair in addition to all of the work that you do in preparation, homework, studying, reading, etc. That amounts to 40-48 hours of classroom time per semester. This course is no different in terms of time expectations. As such, I expect each student to spend about 2.5-3 hours/week ONLINE engaging in Learning Activities, completing chapter quizzes, watching learning videos, completing online interactive studying activities, and reading and contributing to Discussion Board posts for this accelerated summer course. This is in addition to the time you spend each week reading chapters, writing Chapter Analysis and Reflection papers, and studying for quizzes and exams. I think that it is important for students to be aware that your time and online activities are tracked extensively in Blackboard Learn and I use reports generated by the system to help me determine your level of active participation in this online class. I am able to generate reports on how many hours you have spent online, how many chapter quizzes you have taken, how many online interactive studying tools you have used, how many learning activity videos you have watched (and for how long), etc. In many ways, Blackboard Learn could be renamed Big Brother (Google it, for those of you born after 1984). How much of my grade is Active Participation worth? Active participation is worth 20% of your final grade for this course. How do I actively participate? Active participation will be determined by both the quantity and quality of your contributions to online class discussions and/or course engagement in other ways (e.g. coming to office hours, posting course-related comments and responses online via the Blackboard Learn Chat or Discussion features). In general, you should make at least three substantial posts to the Discussion board each week (this includes completing your required Learning Activity posts, which only count as *one* post toward this requirement). You should post your first discussion post no later than WEDNESDAY at 10pm each week. I encourage you to both create new Discussion topics as well as to add to ongoing Discussion topics. Often, Discussions can be created by focusing on how interactive online studying tools or current events in the news connect with the themes and topics from that week’s readings. Be sure to use full sentences when posting to the discussion board and to proofread and spell check your posts prior to submission. I think that it is important for students to be aware that your time and online activities are tracked extensively in Blackboard Learn and I use reports generated by the system to help me determine your level of active participation in this online class. I am able to generate reports on how many hours you have spent online, how many chapter quizzes you have taken, how many online interactive studying tools you have used, how many learning activity videos you have watched (and for how long), etc. In many ways, Blackboard Learn could be renamed Big Brother (Google it, for those of you born after 1984).
    • BE SURE TO PRINT A COPY OF THIS SYLLABUS. YOU WILL NEED TO RETURN TO IT OFTEN OVER THE COURSE OF THIS SEMESTER. 9 Is there anything I need to consider when participating actively in this class? Voicing your ideas and perspectives can be difficult for many people. You are encouraged to push beyond your own comfort zone in this course and to think more deeply and critically about course materials. You should note, however, that voicing your opinions will not be enough; you must also support your reasoning and ideas with empirical evidence (research) from the textbook and/or external documented sources. In addition, we will discuss a number of controversial topics in this course and you are expected to be both thoughtful and respectful when discussing these topics. Please remember to critique ideas and perspectives, not individuals or the people who voice these ideas and perspectives. Inconsiderate or inflammatory posts will be deleted in order to maintain a non-hostile learning environment and you may be asked to come to office hours to discuss any such postings. Am I required to attend office hours as part of my Active Participation grade? Each student must have a one-on-one office hours meeting with me at least once over the course of the semester to discuss how the course is going for you. For your convenience, you may schedule your one-on-one meeting with me in person, through online Blackboard Chat, or via telephone. Not having a one-on-one office hours meeting at least once over the course of the semester will negatively impact your active participation score for this class. I strongly encourage each of you to make use of my office hours whenever there is material that you would like to review or cover in-person rather than online. I would be more than happy to talk with you about any ideas, challenges and/or concerns you might have about the course material, and about sociology more generally. It makes sense to schedule your one-on-one office hours meeting earlier rather than later in the semester. If you meet with me relatively early in the semester, and there are issues with your grade your participation, it will be more possible for us to discuss strategies and techniques for you to address these issues or to raise your grade. If you wait until the end of the semester, it may be too late. When are office hours, where are they held, and do I need to make an appointment? You can meet with me in person, call on the phone (219-785-5264), or initiate a Blackboard Chat session with me anytime from12-2pm every Monday and Wednesday in Schwarz 30G. If these days/times do not work for you, I would be happy to schedule an appointment with you at a day/time that works better in your schedule. Office hours will not be held during the weeks of Fall Break, Thanksgiving, or final exams.
    • BE SURE TO PRINT A COPY OF THIS SYLLABUS. YOU WILL NEED TO RETURN TO IT OFTEN OVER THE COURSE OF THIS SEMESTER. 10 COURSE TOPIC SCHEDULE, REMINDERS & READINGS BY WEEK DATE FOCUS TOPIC READINGS WEEK #1 Thinking Sociologically and Doing Sociology Chapter 1 Aug 26 - Sep 01 Sociology and the Real World pp. 1-37 WEEK #2 Thinking Sociologically and Doing Sociology Chapter 2 Sep 02 - Sep 08 Studying Social Life: Sociological Research Methods pp.38-65 WEEK #3 Framing Social Life Chapter 3 Sep 09 - Sep 15 Cultural Crossroads pp. 67-95 WEEK #4 Framing Social Life Chapter 4 Sep 16 – Sep 22 The Self and Interaction EXAM 1 THIS WEEK ONLINE SEP 20 10AM - SEP 22 10PM COVERS CHAPTERS 1-4 pp. 97-121 WEEK #5 Framing Social Life Chapter 5 Sep 23 - Sep 29 Separate and Together: Life in Groups pp. 123-151 WEEK #6 Framing Social Life Chapter 6 Sep 30 - Oct 06 Deviance pp. 153-179 WEEK #7 Understanding Inequality Chapter 7 Oct 07 - Oct 13 Social Class: The Structure of Inequality pp. 182-219 WEEK #8 Understanding Inequality Chapter 8 Oct 14 - Oct 20 Race and Ethnicity as Lived Experience EXAM 2 THIS WEEK ONLINE OCT 18 10AM – OCT 20 10PM COVERS CHAPTERS 5-8 pp. 221-245 WEEK #9 Understanding Inequality Chapter 09 Oct 21 - Oct 27 Constructing Gender and Sexuality pp. 247-279
    • BE SURE TO PRINT A COPY OF THIS SYLLABUS. YOU WILL NEED TO RETURN TO IT OFTEN OVER THE COURSE OF THIS SEMESTER. 11 COURSE TOPIC SCHEDULE & READINGS BY WEEK WEEK #10 Examining Social Institutions as Sites of Everyday Life Chapter 10 Oct 28 - Nov 03 The Macro-Micro Link in Social Institutions pp. 282-321 WEEK #11 Examining Social Institutions as Sites of Everyday Life Chapter 11 Nov 04 - Nov 10 The Economy, Work, and Working pp. 323-355 WEEK #12 Examining Social Institutions as Sites of Everyday Life Chapter 12 Nov 11 - Nov 17 Life at Home EXAM 3 THIS WEEK ONLINE NOV 15 10AM – NOV 17 10PM COVERS CHAPTERS 9-12 pp. 357-381 WEEK #13 Examining Social Institutions as Sites of Everyday Life Chapter 14 Nov 18 - Nov 24 Health and Illness pp. 411-437 WEEK #14 Thanksgiving Break Break Nov 25 - Dec 01 --- none WEEK #15 Creating Social Change and Envisioning the Future Chapter 15 Dec 02 - Dec 08 City and Country: The Social World and the Natural World pp. 440-481 WEEK #16 Creating Social Change and Envisioning the Future Chapter 16 Dec 09 - Dec 15 Social Change: Looking Toward Tomorrow FINAL EXAM (COVERS CHAPTERS 13, 15, 16) ONLINE DEC 13 10AM – DEC 20 10PM pp. 483-507
    • BE SURE TO PRINT A COPY OF THIS SYLLABUS. YOU WILL NEED TO RETURN TO IT OFTEN OVER THE COURSE OF THIS SEMESTER. 12 WEEK / DATE READING CHECK BLACKBOARD LEARN COMPLETE LEARNING ACTIVITY LEARNING ACTIVITY DISCUSSION BOARD RESPONSE(S) CHAPTER ANALYSIS & REFLECTION PAPER (2x) COMPLETE EXAMS PRINT/STUDY POWERPOINT SLIDES WEEKLY CHAPTER QUIZ ATTEND OFFICE HOURS ONCE MON WED FRI WEEKS 1-8 WEEKS 9-16 1 2 3 4 WEEK 01 AUG 26 – SEP 01 Chapter 01 WEEK 02 SEP 02 – SEP 08 Chapter 02 NA WEEK 03 SEP 09 – SEP 15 Chapter 03 WEEK 04 SEP 16 – SEP 22 Chapter 04 Sep 20 WEEK 05 SEP 23 – SEP 29 Chapter 05 WEEK 06 SEP 30 – OCT 06 Chapter 06 WEEK 07 OCT 07 – OCT 13 Chapter 07 WEEK 08 OCT 14 –OCT 20 Chapter 08 NA Oct 18 WEEK 09 OCT 21 – OCT 27 Chapter 09 WEEK 10 OCT 28 – NOV 03 Chapter 10 WEEK 11 NOV 04 – NOV 10 Chapter 11 WEEK 12 NOV 11 – NOV 17 Chapter 12 Nov 15 WEEK 13 NOV 18 – NOV 24 Chapter 14 WEEK 14 NOV 25 – DEC 01 THANKS- GIVING BREAK NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA WEEK 15 DEC 02 – DEC 08 Chapter 15 WEEK 16 DEC 09 – DEC 15 Chapter 16 Dec 13