Creative Design of Simon the Robot (CHI2011)
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Creative Design of Simon the Robot (CHI2011)

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Presentation of the paper "The Shape of Simon: Creative Design of a Humanoid Robot Shell" by Carla Diana and Dr. Andrea Thomaz, published in CHI2011. Simon is a socially aware robot platform currently ...

Presentation of the paper "The Shape of Simon: Creative Design of a Humanoid Robot Shell" by Carla Diana and Dr. Andrea Thomaz, published in CHI2011. Simon is a socially aware robot platform currently under development at the Georgia Institute of Technology. The presentation was given in person by Carla on May 9, 2011.

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  • The importance of industrial design for Andrea.How theselearnings apply to projects I work on at SmartExpression and anthropomorphism are part of my work, even with a washing machine or mobile deviceWhat you are about to see is a pioneering effort… Artistic/creative process… I’m open to suggestions and thoughts.My purpose is to share the process for others who will be involved with social/emotional robots.Focus of this case study is the head… body shells are also in progress
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  • Stan Winston studios.. Did the robots for Speilberg’s AI Artificial intelligence, for example
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Creative Design of Simon the Robot (CHI2011) Creative Design of Simon the Robot (CHI2011) Presentation Transcript

  • The Shape of Simon
    CHI2011 Conference, Vancouver, BC
    May 9, 2011
  • IntroductionStarting point and precedents
    Establishing a vocabulary and aesthetic target
    Initial explorations
    Making it real: team collaboration
    Simon comes to life
    Reactions
  • Introduction
  • Hi!
    Introduction
  • Smart Design
    introduction
    Designing for people and their everyday lives.
  • Georgia Tech Socially Intelligent Machines Lab
    Introduction
  • Dr. Andrea Thomaz
    Socially Intelligent Machines Lab
    Introduction
  • The Simon Project
    Introduction
  • Starting point and precedents
  • Kismet, Cynthia Breazeal, MIT
    Starting point and precedents
  • The Leonardo Social Robot Project
    Starting point and precedents
  • Design observations from the Leonardo Machine Learning project
    Eyes are important as a natural and intuitive mechanism for HRI
    “Creature”-like offers better success than human-like because it sets appropriate expectations
    Hyperrealism in features, such a Leonardo’s fur, eyelashes, lips and finger pads can have a frightening effect (Leonardo was convincingly “gremlin”-like)
    A balance between machine aesthetics and human forms can help avoid the “uncanny valley”
    While Leo had over 30 degrees of freedom in the head and face, the ears were most often used for emotional and nonverbal expression
    A desirable feature set for the head would include: a rotating and pivoting head, movable eyes, top and bottom eyelids, a mouth, eyebrows and some expressive ear feature
    Key learnings
    Starting point and precedents
  • Initial constraints
    The desired feature set for the head was a rotating and pivoting head, movable eyes, top and bottom eyelids, a mouth, eyebrows and some expressive ear feature
    Overall proportions were predetermined by the Internal body mechanism constructed by Meka robotics and based on a previous mechanical design
    The robot would be non-ambulatory
    Its character would be friendly and inquisitive
    It should appear “young” to reinforce its role as a learner
    Designing a socially aware service robot
    Starting point and precedents
  • Initial constraints
    Starting point and precedents
  • Initial constraints
    Starting point and precedents
  • Establishing a vocabulary and aesthetic target
  • A survey of existing robot types
    Establishing a vocabulary
  • Primary characteristics
    Figure-like impression (forms that can be distinguished as head, face, body and limbs)
    Non-threatening forms
    Affordances that suggest multiple functions
    Simplified forms that avoid the suggestion of musculature or overly detailed anatomies
    Machine or appliance references to balance the creature semantics
    The “friendly doll” aesthetic
    Establishing a vocabulary
  • References: Sony partner robot
    Establishing a vocabulary
  • References: Frobo Fictional robot, Drexel University student
    Establishing a vocabulary
  • References: Marvin, Hitchiker’s Guide to the Glaxy
    Establishing a vocabulary
  • References: Megaman, toy figure
    Establishing a vocabulary
  • References: Munny vinyl toy
    Establishing a vocabulary
  • References: Toonami Tom
    Establishing a vocabulary
  • Observations from references and previous research
    The top of the head would have a covering of some sort, either a helmet, or a form that suggests hair
    Ears would be abstracted to appear as large appliance parts, perhaps antennae
    Eyes would be distinctive, as they are the focal point for the intended human-robot interaction
    Mouth and eyebrows would be used in addition to the eyes and ears in order to express emotion
    Proportions for the body-head size ratio, head-eye size ratio, and eye placement would be child-like
    Ideal characteristics
    Establishing a vocabulary
  • References
    Establishing a vocabulary
  • References
    Establishing a vocabulary
  • References
    Establishing a vocabulary
  • References
    Establishing a vocabulary
  • References
    Establishing a vocabulary
  • Head shape
    Establishing a vocabulary
  • Eye size
    Establishing a vocabulary
  • Eye placement
    Establishing a vocabulary
  • Ear shapes
    Establishing a vocabulary
  • Ear shapes
    Establishing a vocabulary
  • Initial explorations
  • Body types
    Defining proportions
  • Body types
    Defining proportions
  • Initial explorations
    Defining proportions
  • Initial explorations
    Defining proportions
  • Initial explorations
    Defining proportions
  • Initial explorations
    Defining proportions
  • Initial explorations
    Defining proportions
  • Head to body ratio
    Defining proportions
  • 3D sketch
    Defining proportions
  • Making it real: team collaboration
  • Eyeball mechanism
    Making it real: team collaboration
  • Iterations
    Making it real: team collaboration
  • Iterations
    Making it real: team collaboration
  • Iterations
    Making it real: team collaboration
  • Iterations
    Making it real: team collaboration
  • Iterations
    Making it real: team collaboration
  • Animating the design
    Making it real: team collaboration
  • Scaled models
    Making it real: team collaboration
  • Scaled models
    Making it real: team collaboration
  • Seamless eyebrow integration
    Making it real: team collaboration
  • Lip movement
    Making it real: team collaboration
  • Scaled models
    Making it real: team collaboration
  • Simon comes to life
  • Head construction
    Simon comes to life
  • Head construction
    Simon comes to life
  • Head construction
    Simon comes to life
  • Head construction
    Simon comes to life
  • Head construction
    Simon comes to life
  • Reactions
  • Head construction
    Simon comes to life
  • Simon at CHI2010
    reactions
  • Simon’s gaze
    Reactions
  • Head construction
    Simon comes to life
  • Interacting with people
    Simon comes to life
  • “Cool”, “pretty life-like”
    “…amazed by it.”
    Regarding the robot’s gaze, “I was surprised at first but it made the interaction easier because I knew that he knew some of what I was saying”
    “What was amazing was that his movements felt like there was something in there learning and it wasn’t all just motors, metal in plastic. Something inherently felt good about interfacing with Simon versus[sic] a computer”.
    Nova, “Simon, the kinder gentler robot, wit a face that’s easy to love.”
    The Engadget technology blog has described Simon as “super cute” with a “head that will stop you in your tracks”
    What people are saying
    Reactions
  • Simon and Andrea
    Reactions
  • Simon and Andrea
    Reactions
  • Head construction
    Simon comes to life
  • Sophistication of motion–generating more lifelike and believable motion, such as including a library of motion variants
    Contingency detection across a variety of modalities – using a simple cue like “I see a person in front of me” to know when to start an interaction. Enables turn-taking behavior.
    Making Simon a natural and intuitive learner, so anyone could be able to teach it new tasks, studying ways that people teach
    Active learning–having the robot ask questions in order to build learning, rather than waiting for the human to initiate teaching
    What Simon has been up to
    Reactions
  • How will the additional facial features (eyebrows, lips) affect the human-robot interaction?
    Can the presence of body shells further enhance the robot’s approachability?
    How might color and material differences play a role in differentiating features?
    What kind of light vocabulary can be developed for the ear pod feedback? (Right now it indicates a moment of recognition)
    How can the sound of Simon’s voice match his physical features?
    Can different facial geometries imply different robot personalities?
    If we build a brand and social presence (such as a Facebook page) around Simon, will that deepen people’s emotional connection?
    Design questions moving forward
    Reactions
  • http://www.cc.gatech.edu/social-machines/publications.html
    athomaz@cc.gatech.edu
    Reactions
    For more information
    http://www.carladiana.com
    http://www.smartdesignworldwide.com
    carla@carladiana.com