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DES 680 Digital Design Designing  Design What Design Has Become
<ul><li>The world's economy, and the designer's role within it, is radically changing.
Efficiency and aesthetics are no longer  enough.
Companies and societies will continue to prosper only if they push to higher grounds of Innovation. </li></ul>
Innovation: Ima ginative activity fashioned to produce outcomes that are both original and of practical value. *  An activ...
Designers are uniquely positioned to lead innovation, because they suggest that  something may be  and reach out to explor...
EXPERIMENTAL
EMPATHETIC </li></ul>
A tool of innovation associated with design is  Brand Platform. Brand Platform:  the ideas, words, colors, textures, sound...
www.nytimes.com
Connotation and Denotation in Design Connotative:   Having  the p ower of implying or suggesting something in addition to ...
Connotation and Denotation in Design  from The Language of Advertising http://www.stanford.edu/class/linguist34/Unit_03/co...
 
Motion Design   from  Designing for Motion by Matt Woolman “ The desktop computer has transformed the design profession pr...
Motion Design   from  Designing for Motion by Matt Woolman The mid-nineties -  the designer gained access to the tools for...
Motion Design   from  Designing for Motion by Matt Woolman Motion-graphics design is not a single discipline. It is a conv...
Goal-Directed Design  (the Interactive Design process) Make people happy and your products & services will be a success. B...
Understanding business and technical opportunities, requirements, and constraints
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Digital Design

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  1. 1. DES 680 Digital Design Designing Design What Design Has Become
  2. 2. <ul><li>The world's economy, and the designer's role within it, is radically changing.
  3. 3. Efficiency and aesthetics are no longer enough.
  4. 4. Companies and societies will continue to prosper only if they push to higher grounds of Innovation. </li></ul>
  5. 5. Innovation: Ima ginative activity fashioned to produce outcomes that are both original and of practical value. * An activity designers naturally engage in!
  6. 6. Designers are uniquely positioned to lead innovation, because they suggest that something may be and reach out to explore it. Designers are: <ul><li>INTUITIVE
  7. 7. EXPERIMENTAL
  8. 8. EMPATHETIC </li></ul>
  9. 9. A tool of innovation associated with design is Brand Platform. Brand Platform: the ideas, words, colors, textures, sounds, animations, etc. from which later decisions about a product or service may evolve.
  10. 10. www.nytimes.com
  11. 11. Connotation and Denotation in Design Connotative: Having the p ower of implying or suggesting something in addition to what is explicit Denotative: Limited to the explicit meaning of a word or text; &quot;a literal translation&quot; Precisely and clearly expressed or readily observable; leaving nothing to implication
  12. 12. Connotation and Denotation in Design from The Language of Advertising http://www.stanford.edu/class/linguist34/Unit_03/connotation.htm A simple sign has a signifier which denotes its signified; at the second level of connotation, this whole sign becomes a signifier for another signified. Components of advertisements typically have connotations, which connect the advertisement to a larger cultural context. For example, think about the way that hair is portrayed in advertisements for hair products: either immaculately styled, or free-flowing and in motion. The styled image is used in advertisements that connote (a woman, typically) getting herself ready to socialize; the free-flowing image connotes freedom in life: freedom from worries about hair, freedom to travel, freedom of expression.
  13. 14. Motion Design from Designing for Motion by Matt Woolman “ The desktop computer has transformed the design profession profoundly over the past 25 years. Distinct stages of evolution are marked by points at which the once quaint profession of commercial art, or graphic design, has grown into something more complex, as the designer has expanded into new skill sets and areas of creative practice.” The eighties - print production processes, such as page layout, typesetting, and mechanical preparation, move from the domain of specialists working in these areas and onto the desktop of the designer’s workspace. The early nineties - an explosion of typeface design was the result of consumer access to technology.
  14. 15. Motion Design from Designing for Motion by Matt Woolman The mid-nineties - the designer gained access to the tools for creating and producing Web sites and moving type. The new wave - motion graphics, or motion design. Behind this new wave lies yet another technological evolution. Design studios now have access to highly advanced yet affordable hardware and software literally on their desktops. Both 2-D and 3-D animation and video production are now possible “inhouse,” rather than in specialized—and expensive—shops.
  15. 16. Motion Design from Designing for Motion by Matt Woolman Motion-graphics design is not a single discipline. It is a convergence of animation, illustration, graphic design, narrative filmmaking, sculpture, and architecture, to name only a few. The word “graphic” is important: this includes formal content that has a graphic emphasis such as symbols, icons, and illustrated 2- and 3-D objects, often synthesized with live action.
  16. 17. Goal-Directed Design (the Interactive Design process) Make people happy and your products & services will be a success. BUT why are so many digital products so difficult and unpleasant to use? Why aren't we all happy and successful? Imbuing creation with humanity. Pure technologically focused solutions tend to fail. Human oriented design activities: <ul><ul><li>Understanding audience/users' desires, needs, motivations and contexts
  17. 18. Understanding business and technical opportunities, requirements, and constraints
  18. 19. Using this knowledge as a foundation for plans to create products whose form, content, and behavior is useful, usable, and desirable, as well as economically viable and technically feasible. </li></ul></ul>
  19. 20. The Goal-Directed Design Process Design has become a limiting term in the technology industry. For many developers and managers, the word has come to mean what happens in the third process of the evolution of product design I.E. design provides a visual facelift ON the implementation model (the representation of how a machine or program actually works). But design, when properly deployed both identifies user requirements and defines a detailed plan for the behavior and appearance of products – design provides true PRODUCT DEFINITION. Designers as researchers! Current Model broken down into specialists Market research performed by market analysts and ethnographers Design of form performed by graphic/UI and industrial designers
  20. 21. The Goal-Directed Design Process Designers should not be isolated from users or audience. Designers bring to the table empathy. Additionally, it is often difficult for pure researchers to know what research information they've gathered is really important from a design perspective. GOALS, NOT FEATURES, ARE THE KEY TO PRODUCT SUCCESS Marketers often describe a product or service based on its features and/or functions. However, this only provides limited insight in to how human beings can be effective and happy when viewing, using or interacting with a product or service.
  21. 22. Characteristics of Strategic Designers by Tom Klinkowstein They are great Zoomers! The ability to engage in big picture thinking and yet still be details orientated is what I like to call “Zooming”, and its people “Zoomers”. Strategic Designers have this ability to look at situations or design problems from many different angles, think through different solutions, and finally reframe the answer at high and detailed levels. This reframing ability requires a lot of skill. The key ingredient in reframing problems is the all-important ability to wear many hats and speak the many different languages of business, marketing, design, engineering and manufacturing etc. They know the design process like the back of their hand. Strategic Designers are experts of the design process. They know it so well that they can “swim” in it, mould it and control it. The ability to have ultimate control over the design process means that they can ensure that the strategic objectives are achieved or at least maintained. Strategic Designers also know that in order to manage the chaos, design can sometimes be a strong process is the key. They are able to do everything. Being designers first, they are able to do everything a designer can, and perhaps more, because of their connection to the wider view and their ability to reframe. The problem is that because of their focus in design strategy and management they do tend to get rusty, in fact very rusty with the technical design stuff. Therefore it is very advisable for Strategic Designers to keep that “designer in you” alive. Personal projects, constant sketching, running design programs are all ways strategic designers use to keep in touch with things.
  22. 23. Characteristics of Strategic Designers by Tom Klinkowstein They also know that they don’t have to do everything. Strategic Designers know the value of a good team and great teamwork. They also know when to let go and try not to do everything. Letting go is the hardest, but they know where their value lies and when they can add this value in the design process. There is “no job too big or too small”. The interesting thing about Strategic Designers is that their ability is scalable. No problem too big or too small. Strategic Design can be about the smallest thing and also about the biggest. You don’t have to be running multi-million dollar programs to be strategic; you can also be strategic with small meaningful solutions. Strategic design is about an approach or a process of design. Like any process once you get it right it can applicable on many levels and in many situations.
  23. 24. References: About Face 3 The Essentials of Interaction Design, by Alan Cooper, Robert Reimann, and David Cronin, Wiley Publishing | IN, 2007 Tom Klinkowstein, Notes on “What Design Has Become” & “Characteristics of a Strategic Designer” The Language of Advertising http://www.stanford.edu/class/linguist34/Unit_03/connotation.htm
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