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  • 1. Carrillo 1Liliana CarrilloProfessorHistory 30May 19, 2011 Bordering Fires Cristina Garcia Bordering Fires The Vintage Book of Contemporary Mexican andChicano/a Literature is truly a work of art. The short stories that in many ways remind me ofwhat it is to be Mexican, Chicana, Mezitisa. The authors in this book wrote exceptional shortstories of what seems to be a little bit of every Chicano and Mexican family; form, how import itis not to loose ones language, from experiences of border crossings, infidelities, hard workingmothers to travels to Cuernavaca. Bordering Fires truly demonstrates that Chicanos have bordersto cross each and every day. “Chicano English” is a form of live for the Chicano in the United States, even though inMexico “pochos” are still viewed as traitors like la Malinche. Gloria Anzaldua How to Tame aWild Tongue is a remarkable story of how Mexicans/ Latinos keep their language alive unlikeother immigrant groups. As well as there are many types of dialects among the same communitylike pachuco, North American English, Chicano Spanish in California and Texas. Anzaldua’smain theme in this short essay is that keeping our Spanish alive and understanding that there aredifferent dialects in the Spanish/ Mexican languge. Anzaldua speaks of how parents want therechildren to loose their accent, so they can get a job. Sad to say there was a generation whenparents did not teach their children to speak Spanish, because they wanted them to mainly speakEnglish. Anzaldua, states, “We speak a patios, a forked tongue, a variation of two languages’.”Meaning that we ourselves develop our own way; our, own dialect to feel that we belongamongst each other.
  • 2. Carrillo 2 Richard Rodriguez’s India short stories explain how India’s can be classified indifferent races. India or being called India/o can have different meanings to different people. Forexample Rodriguez in India describes that his family is of European decent and are notconsidered Indios. Yet a student undergraduate told him “God, it must be cool to be related toAztecs.” Meaning that although a Mexican family might be of European decent, but have a“Mexican look,” to the whole world a Mexican is a Mexican and people forget about mestizaje.Another theme that was present in India was that of not being ignorant and that Indios are stillalive even though they might not have that certain look. Example, the Indian student who arguedwith him that he did not see the Indian in his face; and, that him himself knows he is an Indio andthat they do not have the same Indio face. The student also would speak of his troubles and howthe Mexican would not understand. But many Mexicans are Indio’s due to Mestizaje. Rodriguezused la Malinche la India, La Indian whore who betrayed Mexico for Cortez,and in the endherself was betrayed by Cortez. Yet the Indian survived more than the Spanish. Traveling to Cuernava expaling his advenruer to find the lost B. Traven. RudolfoAnaya’s B.Traven Is Alive and Well in Cuernavaca; in this story the volcano “Popo” has a storythat must be told. Him and his friend Justino go on an adventure to Popo. Justinos jefe is DonFrancisco, a man who kills many people and the steals their fortune. Don Francisco hides hismany in Pozo de Mendoza but he Francisco is cursed and he can not touch the gold because itwill disappear. Mendoza was a man who Don Francisco killed, Mendoza cursed Don Francisco.Justino inspired authors and made them curious about the gold in Popo. Rodriguez met an oldman who he thought was B. Taven but really was not. Towards the end of his story he meets theold man who I believe is B. Traven and explains to him that writers have a curse; the curse of
  • 3. Carrillo 3hearing stories and then following them. B.Traven was following Justino;s story about the goldin Popo in Cuernavaca alive and well. Never Marry a Mexican by Sandra Cineros main theme really about the Mexicanwomen and the infidelities that are brought among families. She starts of by telling the live of aMexican family, the children raise themselves in this case the dad is lazy and the mother has twojobs just to get by. Her mother tells her to never marry a Mexican, because frustration with herhusband. Then her mother married a white man after her father died, and she could stand that.She then tells about her being la malince because he made other woman cry for sleeping withtheir men. Towards the end she tells her student Drew about sleeping with his father but since hewas white was not allowed to marry a Mexican. This in some cases still happens the not beingable to mix into cultures due to race. Ruben Martinez Excerpt From Crossing Over: A Mexican Family on the Migrant Trailis an exceptional story that describes the immigrant family. From the clothing they are wearingto their fears and the crossing over. Martinez gets every detail down to the point. Its is amazingto even think that at one point border crossing was so easy and not such a dangerous path, unliketoday due to Pete Wilson’s hate for Mexicans/ Latinos and immigrants in general. He details theMigrant families’ suffrage thru all the racism. And how the border is all about politics, powerand money.Our people Mexicans, Chicanos cross borders every day not somuch to prove our selves but rather just to survive and feel likewe belong somewhere. We are Aztlan! "Por La Razatodo, Fuera de La Raza nada"
  • 4. Carrillo 4