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Motorcycle Accident Scene Management& First Responder<br />
Good Samaritan Principles<br />In Canada (except Quebec) and most of the United States, you have no legal obligation to he...
Don’t be a….<br />
PLEASE REMEMBER…<br />In an emergency situation, psychological management is important. If a central person takes charge a...
The “ GOLDEN HOUR” <br />
“GOLDEN HOUR” <br />“Golden Hour” is the BEST timethat trauma victims have the best chance of survival if they are in surg...
“GOLDEN HOUR” cont.<br />DO NOT RUN to the victim…<br />Take a look around to see what the scene looks like…<br />How many...
One of the critical skills for performing effective First Aid is to insure that the scene is safe for the victim as well a...
Help from Others<br />The chances of performing successful and effective first aid increase if there is more then one pers...
Securing the scene<br />Rule #1 ask yourself if the scene is safe???<br />
Are we in a BLIND TURN?<br />
Scene safety #1<br />Establish a SAFETY CIRCLE….<br />If you have two or more riders with you then establish a SAFE SCENE ...
Scene safety #1<br />Now send another person    down the road in the opposite direction to slow traffic down or close the ...
Safety Factors…accident scenes have a lot going on at once.<br />More than one victim<br />Vehicles not slowing down<br />...
Fire. <br /> People who smoke tend to want to light up under stress.  Ask these people to move away or extinguish their sm...
Bike. <br />If the bike is not severely damaged and is in the way, if you have extra people have them roll the bike out of...
Scene is secured now let’s CALL 911 & Care for the victim<br />
Before beginning First Aid one of the important things about administering effective First Aid is to determine when it is ...
TRIAGE<br />TRIAGETRIAGETRIAGE<br />TRIAGE TRIAGETRIAGE<br />TRIAGE  TRIAGETRIAGE<br />
TRIAGE- IS FRENCH to sort<br />Primarily used for battlefield medicine or during disaster situations:<br /> Triage allows ...
The medical personnel on the scene preforming triage move as quickly as possible from patient to patient assessing their s...
Patients who will not survive without immediate medical attention, and are very likely to survive with help are given a hi...
Note: if they are talking to you it tells you two  things that they <br />Have an open airway for now and <br />They are c...
Lets assume the victim is lying on the ground supine, the person who is attending to the victim should sit behind their he...
You can use clothes to help stabilize C-Spine tooor you may use your knees<br />
What if they are standing up or sitting up and they are complaining about their neck hurting?<br />Tell them to either sit...
***What if they are sitting up or got up and walked around then started to feel bad?Have them stay seated or have them lie...
What if they are lying flat on their stomach (prone)<br />You will need to LOG ROLL this person over to the supine positio...
In a single coordinated move, roll the person over to their back while supporting their head – keeping their neck straight...
First Step in determining the status of the victim<br />U- Unresponsiveness<br />A-Airway<br />B-Breathing<br />C-Circulat...
U- Unresponsiveness<br />As you are holding C spine you can assess the victim or have someone take over this position.<br ...
U- Unresponsiveness cont…<br />Who is the President of the USA?<br />When you talk to the victim initially it is important...
A- AIRWAY<br />Is there something impeding the Airway? Gravel in the helmet might mean gravel in the mouth, something down...
If Unresponsive<br />Airway:  Clear the airwayPut the person on his or her back on a firm surface. Kneel next to the perso...
B-BREATHING<br />Is the person Breathing? Determine this by listening close to the mouth and nose.<br />Watch the chest ri...
B-BREATHING<br />Breathing:  Breathe for the person<br />Rescue breathing can be mouth-to-mouth breathing or mouth-to-nose...
C-CIRCULATION CHECK<br />CIRCULATION: Restore blood circulation <br />Check if the victim's heart is beating. In order to ...
C-CIRCULATION CHECK<br />Check for pulse by feeling the carotid artery, (use your first two fingers not the thumb) this is...
C-CERVICAL SPINE IMMOBLIZATION SUPPORT<br />CONSIDER EVERY MOTORYCLE ACCIDENT A HEAD INJURY!!!!<br />CONSIDER EVERY MOTORC...
Helmet removal or not?<br />If breathing is taking place normally, LEAVE HELMET ON!  But if you have two trained persons y...
What if our cell phones are not working????<br />Send one or two bikes to the nearest house.<br />When you go to the door ...
What to say to the 911 dispatcher<br />There has been a motorcycle accident.<br />We need ___ambulances.<br />We have ___p...
Give the dispatcher some kind of picture of the accident, VERY IMPORTANT!!!!<br />Location of the accident.  Get help from...
Documentation????<br />Before the ambulance arrives, if you can document information before they become unconscious it wou...
 age
 phone numbers of a relative
how long did they remain unconscious?
Are they repeating themselves over and over again???</li></li></ul><li>Documentation cont…<br />If you have this kind of t...
Time to root for loot<br />
Time to root for loot<br />No just kidding.  Ask the victim first where they keep their information.<br />Looking for info...
SIGNS OF SHOCK<br />
SIGNS OF SHOCK<br />Inability to answer questions coherently.<br />Pale, cool and clammy skin.  (LOOK at the color of the ...
SIGNS OF SHOCK cont…<br />Note: There isn’t much we can do once someone starts going into shock, but a few minor things th...
Bodily Fluids<br />
Bodily Fluids<br />Gloves -  to protect from blood or other bodily fluids<br />                           (if you carry th...
Controlling Bleeding<br />
Control Bleeding<br />When dealing with bleeding wound, Priority #1 is to stop the bleeding.  Below are several rules to k...
Make sure the cloth stays in place and is not moved during that time, as movement can re-aggravate the wound and cause ble...
TID BIT OF INFO from Sue<br />Involve the victim, if able, to apply pressure on the wound while you are putting on protect...
Control Bleeding<br />Capillary bleeding - this occurs with a minor cut or scrape. Bleeding is light, and usually stops it...
Venous bleeding - this is heavier than capillary bleeding, and occurs in shallow cuts that have reached a vein. It results...
Arterial bleeding - this is the most serious type of bleeding, and occurs with very deep wounds. Bright red blood spurts o...
Arterial bleeding…cont<br />Apply extremely firm pressure to the wound, an item of clothing or your hand will do if there ...
Control Bleeding…cont<br />Large chunks of debris should be removed from the wound. However, any impaled objects should no...
Bleeding from the Head<br />If the bleeding is coming from the head DO NOT apply pressure.  If the skull is fractured we d...
Nosebleed<br />The doctor said I shouldn’t have so many nose bleeds if I leave my finger out of there!<br />Have the victi...
Sterile Dressings???<br />Please NOTE: sterile dressings are not common on the road, so please use the cleanest cloths you...
First Aid - Non-Bleeding Wounds that you cannot see <br />Head Injury<br />Chest<br />Abdomen<br />Pelvis<br />
First Aid - Non-Bleeding Wounds <br />Wounds that do not cause bleeding that you can see  should be treated with as much a...
Head Injury non Bleeding that you can see!!!!<br /> For example, a blow to the head might not show any exterior signs of d...
Symptoms of Head Injury<br />The following symptoms suggest a more serious head injury -- other than a concussion or contu...
Loss of consciousness, confusion, or drowsiness<br />Low breathing rate or drop in blood pressure<br />Restlessness, clums...
First Aid for Closed Head Injuries<br />Moderate to Severe head injury, take the following steps:<br />a. Stabilize the he...
Internal Injury<br />
Here is the list of injuries where you should suspect internal injury: <br />Car crashes, even when the impact/damage is m...
First Aid for Internal Injury:<br /> Put the victim in the horizontal position on his back<br />Make sure the victim does ...
Burns<br />
BURNS<br />The first step is to put out the fire by suffocating it or dowsing it with water.<br />Then determine the degre...
TYPES OF BURNS<br />First-degree burn- The least serious burns are those in which only the outer layer of skin is burned. ...
TYPES OF BURNS<br />Second-degree burn-Second-degree burns are more serious and involve the skin layers beneath the top la...
TYPES OF BURNS<br />Third-degree burn- The most serious burn.  These burns are painless (due to nerve damage) and involve ...
DONT’S<br />Important:   -  Don't apply butter or ointments to the burn to ensure proper healing of the burned skin.  -  D...
Until an emergency unit arrives, follow these steps:<br />  Make sure the victim is no longer in contact with the burning ...
Sprains, Strains & Fractures<br />
First Aid – Sprains, Strains & Fractures, they all look alike?<br />
Sprains & Strains <br />Sprain is an injury which occurs as a result of stretching or tearing of ligaments.  <br />Strain ...
How to treat Fractures<br />They may be Closed<br />Skin is not broken. Secure fracture using a stable object for comfort....
They may be Open: <br />Splint the leg for immobility, taking care not to move the bone ends any more than is absolutely n...
The symptoms<br />The symptoms are mild to severe pain, stiffness, swelling and/or bruising.  Generally, it is hard to dif...
First Aid: to Fractures, sprains & Strains<br />If the person is unresponsive, isn't breathing or isn't moving, proceed wi...
NOTE<br />Reducing a compound fracture in the field is beyond the scope of this seminar.** In cases of femur fractures, th...
Femur Fracture<br />
How to make bandages and bandage with out TAPE<br />
How to make strong Cravat Bandage- if not just tear strips from a shirt<br />
Types of bandages for various hurtsThe Hand<br />
Roller Bandage for the Ankle and Foot<br />
Cravat Bandage for the Elbow or Knee<br />
Cravat Bandage for the Arm, Forearm, Leg, or Thigh<br />
SPLINTS<br />
SPLINTS- ON THE STREET<br />Body work<br />Wood/branches<br />Card board<br />Newspaper<br />ECT…<br />
Impaled Objects<br />
Stabilize Impaled Objects<br />Do not attempt to move or remove the object. Stabilize the impaled body part.<br />Control ...
Abrasions- just keep from bleeding<br />
Amputations<br />Put on latex gloves to prevent the spread of infectious disease.<br />Apply direct pressure and elevate t...
Save the Amputated Body Part<br />Rinse the amputated body part with disinfected water if you can.  <br />Wrap the amputat...
Avulsion-wrap it up<br />
Crush Injuries- wrap it up<br />
Dislocations-stabilize and secure to body<br />
Stabilize and secure to body ask victim what feels better<br />
Eye injuries<br />
What do I do?<br />Gently bandage the eye you may add some water to the cloth so it doesn’t stick to cloth.<br />Do not ap...
Lacerations- control bleeding and wrap up… kind of tight<br />
Law Enforcement<br />
Dealing with Law Enforcement<br />
Dealing with Law Enforcement<br />Identify yourself as the one who was “in charge”.<br />Let them know if you moved the bi...
DEALING WITH EMS<br />
When the Ambulance arrives<br />EMT’s and Paramedics are in charge now..thank GOD no more stress<br />Give factual account...
When the Ambulance arrives<br />Give EMS a honest evaluation of drug/alcohol consumption<br />Stay back and let them get t...
STATISTICS<br />
Statistical Analysis Center<br />
 Statistical Analysis Center<br />
US Statistical Analysis Center<br />Motorcyclists make up 2% of road traffic.<br />Only 2% of registered vehicles are moto...
RIDER SAFETY<br />
RIDER SAFETY----RESEARCH!!<br />Wearing reflective or fluorescent clothing.(reduces crash injury by 37%) <br />White or li...
ARRIVE ALIVE<br />
What would Sue do to stay safe?<br />MOST important I RIDE MY OWN RIDE!!!<br />I will always Remember there is always goin...
You do not want this to happen to you<br />
No one is ever completely out of risk of injury. Disaster can strike anytime, anywhere.<br />
Sorry, this can be too much….isn’t she cute!!!<br />
CARRY IMPORTANT INFO<br />
I WOULD PLACE MY INFORMATION ABOUT MYSELF<br />THREE PLACES…<br />a. IN MY TANK BAG<br />b. IN MY HELMET<br />c. UNDER THE...
What does it contain????<br />Copy of my drivers license<br />My husbands cell phone #<br />My sister’s cell phone #  <br ...
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Slide 1 - St. Louis' Premier Motorcycle Forum - STL Moto

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Transcript of "Slide 1 - St. Louis' Premier Motorcycle Forum - STL Moto"

  1. 1. Motorcycle Accident Scene Management& First Responder<br />
  2. 2.
  3. 3. Good Samaritan Principles<br />In Canada (except Quebec) and most of the United States, you have no legal obligation to help a person in need. However, governments want to encourage people to help others, so they recognize Good Samaritan Principles. These principles protect you if you choose to help someone in need. Keep in mind that once you begin to give assistance, you are obligated to use reasonable skill and care based on your personal knowledge or level of first aid training. By law, you are considered a Good Samaritan if you give help in good faith, without being paid. You should always get permission to help a conscious casualty, regardless of your level of expertise. Never abandon an injured individual.<br />
  4. 4. Don’t be a….<br />
  5. 5. PLEASE REMEMBER…<br />In an emergency situation, psychological management is important. If a central person takes charge and is remaining calm, this will transfer to all of the other people on the scene and will help the victim far more than if everyone is overly excited and pumped with adrenaline. <br />
  6. 6. The “ GOLDEN HOUR” <br />
  7. 7. “GOLDEN HOUR” <br />“Golden Hour” is the BEST timethat trauma victims have the best chance of survival if they are in surgery within one hour after the accident. <br />Qualified medical personnel are really the people who should be handling everything, but until they arrive there are things that we, the untrained motorcyclists, can do to help the medical professionals before they arrive. <br />Adrenaline will be going Full Blast<br />Stay Calm remember someone NEEDS to, the guy who has crashed is counting on you or you or you…<br />
  8. 8. “GOLDEN HOUR” cont.<br />DO NOT RUN to the victim…<br />Take a look around to see what the scene looks like…<br />How many bikes/people are involved?<br />Look for safety hazards, ie…cars, fuel, power lines, ect.<br />Is the scene safe? Are you safe from vehicles running into you and everyone else ?<br />
  9. 9. One of the critical skills for performing effective First Aid is to insure that the scene is safe for the victim as well as everyone else present.  All precautions have to be taken prior to administering the actual First Aid.  If it's a traffic accident, insure that the cars driving buy are aware of the accident, signal for help from drivers, ask them to monitor/direct traffic while you proceed with first aid.  Engage help!!!! <br />
  10. 10. Help from Others<br />The chances of performing successful and effective first aid increase if there is more then one person assisting in Emergency.  First Aid trained professional should make every effort to locate additional help in the vicinity of the incident.  These people could be deployed to call 911 or help secure the scene.   <br />
  11. 11. Securing the scene<br />Rule #1 ask yourself if the scene is safe???<br />
  12. 12. Are we in a BLIND TURN?<br />
  13. 13. Scene safety #1<br />Establish a SAFETY CIRCLE….<br />If you have two or more riders with you then establish a SAFE SCENE before you check out the victim….Your lives comes FIRST then the victim!!!<br />Send a person to the apex of the curve and have them slow traffic down or if scene is really bad keep traffic from coming thru<br />
  14. 14. Scene safety #1<br />Now send another person down the road in the opposite direction to slow traffic down or close the road<br />Now we have established a SAFE SCENE lets look at the victim….remember you ALL have to be safe first!!!<br />
  15. 15.
  16. 16. Safety Factors…accident scenes have a lot going on at once.<br />More than one victim<br />Vehicles not slowing down<br />Hazardous material spills (gas, oil, brake fluid). People and vehicles will slip on this stuff. Inform the Police and EMS about the spills.<br />If power lines are involved when you speak to 911 let them know of the power lines and they can call the utility company.<br />Keep in mind if we have power lines involved and the utility company has not been called we are losing precious time in the “Golden Hour”.<br />
  17. 17. Fire. <br /> People who smoke tend to want to light up under stress. Ask these people to move away or extinguish their smokes. We all understand how stressful these situations are and it is easy to forget. WE do not want to make matters worse.<br />
  18. 18. Bike. <br />If the bike is not severely damaged and is in the way, if you have extra people have them roll the bike out of the way and onto the side of the road.<br />NOTE: Leave a rock or other type of marker to document where the bike was.<br />
  19. 19. Scene is secured now let’s CALL 911 & Care for the victim<br />
  20. 20. Before beginning First Aid one of the important things about administering effective First Aid is to determine when it is needed.  <br />Below are some general guidelines for: 1.   If the victim is responsive introduce yourself and offer help 2.   If the victim agrees proceed with First Aid administration 3.   If the victim refuses, call 911 and wait for the arrival with the victim 4.   If person is unresponsive, assume that your help is needed and proceed with First Aid/CPR<br />
  21. 21. TRIAGE<br />TRIAGETRIAGETRIAGE<br />TRIAGE TRIAGETRIAGE<br />TRIAGE TRIAGETRIAGE<br />
  22. 22. TRIAGE- IS FRENCH to sort<br />Primarily used for battlefield medicine or during disaster situations:<br /> Triage allows health care professionals to determine which patients require immediate attention to survive<br /> Patients able to wait<br />Patients which are beyond help with the limited resources available. Emergency Rooms also triage patients.<br />
  23. 23. The medical personnel on the scene preforming triage move as quickly as possible from patient to patient assessing their situation. Patients with non-life threatening injuries are marked as low priority. Things like broken bones or minor wounds can would fall into this category. Often times, lightly injured patients, sometimes referred to as the "walking wounded", can assist each other with basic first aid and in moving to safety in a dangerous environment such as an accident scene.<br />
  24. 24. Patients who will not survive without immediate medical attention, and are very likely to survive with help are given a high priority. Severe bleeding from wounds, amputation, or internal injury would fall into this category. Basic first aid is not enough to save these patients, but basic surgery will give them a high probability of survival.<br />triage is a necessary tool for health care professionals faced with an emergency situation.<br />
  25. 25.
  26. 26. Note: if they are talking to you it tells you two things that they <br />Have an open airway for now and <br />They are conscious<br />If you haven’t CALLED 911 then do so now.<br />Really important DO NOT try to move the victim and DO NOT let them get to their bike. The victim will be really concerned with his/her bike, DO NOT let him/her move. Please keep them from moving!!!!!!<br />Do Not let them drink anything.<br />
  27. 27. Lets assume the victim is lying on the ground supine, the person who is attending to the victim should sit behind their head and should stabilize his/her head to avoid unnecessary movement (i.e. hold the head still). Assume the person has a back/neck injury and any unnecessary movement could risk paralysis.<br />Ask someone to find the helmet and<br />give this to EMS.<br />
  28. 28. You can use clothes to help stabilize C-Spine tooor you may use your knees<br />
  29. 29. What if they are standing up or sitting up and they are complaining about their neck hurting?<br />Tell them to either sit or lie down and hold the neck so it doesn’t move any more. Remember to tell EMS that they where up walking around first.<br />
  30. 30. ***What if they are sitting up or got up and walked around then started to feel bad?Have them stay seated or have them lie down and hold their neck.<br />
  31. 31. What if they are lying flat on their stomach (prone)<br />You will need to LOG ROLL this person over to the supine position using two or more people.<br />Have one person, kneel above their head – facing their feet and hold their head or helmet. Hold their head or helmet with your pointer finger just above the spine in the back of the head and your thumb toward their chin and other fingers under their head. <br />A second person kneels to the injured persons side and hold their arms and chest while a <br />Third person, kneels to the same side and holds their legs. <br />
  32. 32. In a single coordinated move, roll the person over to their back while supporting their head – keeping their neck straight and untilted – and keeping their back straight and supported. This is done by Person 2 & 3 pulling on the far side of the injured person's arms and legs toward them to roll them <br />over onto their back, while the head is supported by Responder 1 and turned along with the body to keep it aligned with the spine. <br />
  33. 33. First Step in determining the status of the victim<br />U- Unresponsiveness<br />A-Airway<br />B-Breathing<br />C-Circulation<br />C- Cervical Spine Immobilization Support<br />This is done every 5 mins thereafter<br />
  34. 34. U- Unresponsiveness<br />As you are holding C spine you can assess the victim or have someone take over this position.<br />Tell them who you are. (if they do not know you)<br />Ask Who they are? Some times we ride with people we do not know.<br />What day is it? (Mon, Tues, Wed ect…) What Year?<br />
  35. 35. U- Unresponsiveness cont…<br />Who is the President of the USA?<br />When you talk to the victim initially it is important that the victim answers you without moving their head. Ask them to speak yes or no.<br />If Unresponsive check Airway…<br />
  36. 36. A- AIRWAY<br />Is there something impeding the Airway? Gravel in the helmet might mean gravel in the mouth, something down the throat? This needs to be cleared IMMEDIATLEY, without helmet removal if at all possible.<br />Use finger sweep to clear Airway using two fingers start at the corner of the mouth and sweep to the other side exiting the opposite corner of the mouth.<br />
  37. 37. If Unresponsive<br />Airway:  Clear the airwayPut the person on his or her back on a firm surface. Kneel next to the person's neck and shoulders. Open the person's airway using the head tilt-chin lift. Put your palm on the person's forehead and gently push down. Then with the other hand, gently lift the chin forward to open the airway. Check for normal breathing, taking no more than 10 seconds: Look for chest motion, listen for breath sounds, and feel for the person's breath on your cheek and ear. Do not consider gasping to be normal breathing. If the person isn't breathing normally or you aren't sure, begin mouth-to-mouth breathing.<br />
  38. 38. B-BREATHING<br />Is the person Breathing? Determine this by listening close to the mouth and nose.<br />Watch the chest rise.<br />Place your hand on the chest to feel if it is rising with air.<br />If NOT…. REMOVE HELMET (we will go over this later on)<br />
  39. 39. B-BREATHING<br />Breathing:  Breathe for the person<br />Rescue breathing can be mouth-to-mouth breathing or mouth-to-nose breathing if the mouth is seriously injured or can't be opened. With the airway open (using the head tilt-chin lift), pinch the nostrils shut for mouth-to-mouth breathing and cover the person's mouth with yours, making a seal. <br />Prepare to give two rescue breaths. Give the first rescue breath — lasting one second — and watch to see if the chest rises. If it does rise, give the second breath. If the chest doesn't rise, repeat the head tilt-chin lift and then give the second breath. <br />
  40. 40. C-CIRCULATION CHECK<br />CIRCULATION: Restore blood circulation <br />Check if the victim's heart is beating. In order to do that,  find carotid artery. It is located in the depression between the windpipe and the neck muscles. Place two fingertips on it and apply slight pressure for several seconds. If no circulation is detected, begin chest compressions. <br />
  41. 41. C-CIRCULATION CHECK<br />Check for pulse by feeling the carotid artery, (use your first two fingers not the thumb) this is right next to the wind pipe/Adam’s apple on either side. If pulse is not present begin CPR.<br />
  42. 42. C-CERVICAL SPINE IMMOBLIZATION SUPPORT<br />CONSIDER EVERY MOTORYCLE ACCIDENT A HEAD INJURY!!!!<br />CONSIDER EVERY MOTORCYCLE ACCIDENT A CERVICAL/BACK INJURY!!!!<br />VIDEO…<br />
  43. 43. Helmet removal or not?<br />If breathing is taking place normally, LEAVE HELMET ON! But if you have two trained persons you may or may not remove the helmet.<br />IF helmet is missing from the victims head, have someone LOOK for it and give it to EMS when they arrive and make sure you tell them you found the helmet ??feet away.<br />Remove Helmet if airway is blocked or they are not breathing. (Demonstration of removal)<br />
  44. 44. What if our cell phones are not working????<br />Send one or two bikes to the nearest house.<br />When you go to the door please remain calm or you will scare them. THINK… if someone came to your door how would react to a frantic person. Crackhead, methhead, ect… <br />Do not ask to come in, because you are less threatening when asking them to call 911. Tell them “There has been a motorcycle accident” and it is really serious we need EMS and tell them what road it is on and what direction. How many people are hurt? We might even require a Helicopter…<br />
  45. 45. What to say to the 911 dispatcher<br />There has been a motorcycle accident.<br />We need ___ambulances.<br />We have ___people injured and tell the dispatcher how badly injured they are.<br />We might need a Medical Helicopter. (remember a severely traumatized person will require a whole ambulance crew to themselves)<br />
  46. 46. Give the dispatcher some kind of picture of the accident, VERY IMPORTANT!!!!<br />Location of the accident. Get help from people on the scene.<br />You the caller should hang up LAST with the dispatcher. The dispatcher is entering information into the computer while you are talking. Stay on the line until they hang up.<br />
  47. 47. Documentation????<br />Before the ambulance arrives, if you can document information before they become unconscious it would be helpful to have…<br /><ul><li>the victims name
  48. 48. age
  49. 49. phone numbers of a relative
  50. 50. how long did they remain unconscious?
  51. 51. Are they repeating themselves over and over again???</li></li></ul><li>Documentation cont…<br />If you have this kind of time with the victim then ask…<br />AMPLE:<br />Are you allergic to anything?<br />Are you on any mediations? Street drugs?<br />What is your past medical history? Maybe this is why they crashed????????????<br />When was the last time you ate?<br />Events leading to crash…did they flip over? How many times? Did they slide and then hit something? ect….<br />Were they in front of Sue???? (No do not ask this…silly)<br />
  52. 52. Time to root for loot<br />
  53. 53. Time to root for loot<br />No just kidding. Ask the victim first where they keep their information.<br />Looking for information in the wallet like name ect…<br />If they are unconscious make sure you have a WITNESS!!! To look for drivers license.<br />If the victim has rings on or a watch and the fingers/wrist has a potential to swell, please take these off as they may hinder the circulation to this area later on. Plus you have preserved their stuff.<br />CONSENT is paramount if the victim is conscious….if not get a WITNESS!!!!! <br />What do you do with stuff? I would give it to the Police officer or EMS. <br />
  54. 54. SIGNS OF SHOCK<br />
  55. 55. SIGNS OF SHOCK<br />Inability to answer questions coherently.<br />Pale, cool and clammy skin. (LOOK at the color of the lips are they PINK?)<br />Delayed capillary refill. Squeeze finger nail bed see how long it takes the blood to come back. Normal time is less than 2 seconds. If this takes longer this is not good. Elevate legs if no spinal injury is suspected. <br />
  56. 56. SIGNS OF SHOCK cont…<br />Note: There isn’t much we can do once someone starts going into shock, but a few minor things that may help.<br />Assure breathing is adequate.<br />Loosen restrictive clothing.<br />Reassure victim.<br />Ask them if they are Hot or Cold????<br />Do they have any numbness in the fingers, toes, hands, and nose.<br />Keep them warm.<br />Elevate the feet ~6inches.<br />
  57. 57. Bodily Fluids<br />
  58. 58. Bodily Fluids<br />Gloves -  to protect from blood or other bodily fluids<br /> (if you carry them)<br />In case you came in contact with bodily fluids, blood or skin follow the following instructions as soon as you can:<br />Take the gloves off, if wearing any<br />Wash the area with soap (work up soap lather for 15 seconds) and water, if contact with eyes, nose, or ear rinse with water   <br />Wash your hands thoroughly with soap, if not available use waterless hand sanitizer, and wash your hands with water later<br />
  59. 59. Controlling Bleeding<br />
  60. 60. Control Bleeding<br />When dealing with bleeding wound, Priority #1 is to stop the bleeding.  Below are several rules to keep in mind:<br />Maintain composure, no need to panic<br />In most cases, bleeding can be stopped by applying pressure to the wound <br />Bleeding generally looks much worse, than it really is. If the bleeding is not stopping, apply clean cloth or bandage to the wound for 15 to 30 minutes with reasonable amount of pressure.<br />
  61. 61. Make sure the cloth stays in place and is not moved during that time, as movement can re-aggravate the wound and cause bleeding to resume.  If the bleeding persists, apply the second dressing to the wound and increase the pressure.  As mentioned above, you can control or stop the bleeding in majority of the cases with pressure alone. Priority #2 is to keep the wound clean.<br />If there is visible debris, extract it with your hands before you apply pressure.<br />
  62. 62. TID BIT OF INFO from Sue<br />Involve the victim, if able, to apply pressure on the wound while you are putting on protective equipment or taking care of other wounds.<br />
  63. 63. Control Bleeding<br />Capillary bleeding - this occurs with a minor cut or scrape. Bleeding is light, and usually stops itself as the blood clots. <br />Applying gentle pressure can help to stop the bleeding, but it will usually stop itself fairly quickly.<br />
  64. 64. Venous bleeding - this is heavier than capillary bleeding, and occurs in shallow cuts that have reached a vein. It results in a steady but slow flow of dark red blood. <br />This type of bleeding can be treated by <br />applying firm, direct pressure to the wound.<br />
  65. 65. Arterial bleeding - this is the most serious type of bleeding, and occurs with very deep wounds. Bright red blood spurts out of the wound, and can be fatal if not treated quickly. This type of bleeding requires more complex treatment. <br /> The victim should lie down, with their head lower than their trunk and their feet elevated. This reduces the risk of fainting.<br /> Elevation of the bleeding body part is also helpful, as it can slow down the rate at which the blood escapes from the wound. <br />
  66. 66. Arterial bleeding…cont<br />Apply extremely firm pressure to the wound, an item of clothing or your hand will do if there is nothing else to use.<br /> If the blood begins to seep through this, apply something else over the top of it (do not remove it). Apply firm pressure until medical help arrives. <br />
  67. 67. Control Bleeding…cont<br />Large chunks of debris should be removed from the wound. However, any impaled objects should not be touched…just stabilize them.<br />
  68. 68. Bleeding from the Head<br />If the bleeding is coming from the head DO NOT apply pressure. If the skull is fractured we do not want to force the bone into the brain. Just wrap the bandage all around the head. <br />This will keep it clean.<br />
  69. 69. Nosebleed<br />The doctor said I shouldn’t have so many nose bleeds if I leave my finger out of there!<br />Have the victim sit in upright position<br />Pinch victim's nose with thumb and index finger, and hold it for about 10 minutes, this generally applies enough pressure to the septum (the softer part) to stop the bleeding<br />If bleeding re-occurs, blow the nose with force to clear out the remaining blood clots, and repeat the pinching procedure described above.<br />
  70. 70. Sterile Dressings???<br />Please NOTE: sterile dressings are not common on the road, so please use the cleanest cloths you can or find the cleanest person with the cleanest clothes.<br />Try and keep these areas as clean as you can. <br />
  71. 71. First Aid - Non-Bleeding Wounds that you cannot see <br />Head Injury<br />Chest<br />Abdomen<br />Pelvis<br />
  72. 72. First Aid - Non-Bleeding Wounds <br />Wounds that do not cause bleeding that you can see should be treated with as much and probably more attention than the wounds that do bleed.  The danger here is that the damage cannot be clearly assessed.  For example, a blow to the head might not show any exterior signs of distress, not even a bruise, but the victim might be experiencing a life threatening condition because of internal bleeding. <br />
  73. 73. Head Injury non Bleeding that you can see!!!!<br /> For example, a blow to the head might not show any exterior signs of distress, not even a bruise, but the victim might be experiencing a life threatening condition because of internal bleeding. <br />
  74. 74. Symptoms of Head Injury<br />The following symptoms suggest a more serious head injury -- other than a concussion or contusion -- and require emergency medical treatment:<br />Changes in, or unequal size of pupils<br />Convulsions –also known as Seizures<br />Distorted features of the face<br />Fluid draining from nose, mouth, or ears (may be clear or bloody)<br />Fracture in the skull or face, bruising of the face, swelling at the site of the injury, or scalp wound<br />Impaired hearing, smell, taste, or vision<br />Inability to move one or more limbs<br />Irritability , personality changes, or unusual behavior<br />
  75. 75. Loss of consciousness, confusion, or drowsiness<br />Low breathing rate or drop in blood pressure<br />Restlessness, clumsiness, or lack of coordination<br />Severe headache<br />Slurred speech or blurred vision<br />Stiff neck or vomiting<br />Symptoms improve, and then suddenly get worse (change in consciousness)<br />Asking the same questions over and over.<br />
  76. 76. First Aid for Closed Head Injuries<br />Moderate to Severe head injury, take the following steps:<br />a. Stabilize the head and neck <br />b. If the person is vomiting, roll the head, neck, and body as one unit to prevent choking. This still protects the spine, which you must always assume is injured in the case of a head injury.<br />For a mild head injury,<br />c. no specific treatment may be needed.<br />
  77. 77. Internal Injury<br />
  78. 78. Here is the list of injuries where you should suspect internal injury: <br />Car crashes, even when the impact/damage is minor<br />Shock signs after the injury, even with no signs of any exterior damage<br />Injury via collision, generally sustained in sports, especially if there is a loss of consciousness<br />Injury to abdominal or pain in abdominal <br />Injury to the chest or pain in the chest<br />
  79. 79. First Aid for Internal Injury:<br /> Put the victim in the horizontal position on his back<br />Make sure the victim does not move <br />Check for signs of shock<br />If the victim does not respond start CPR if you know it<br />
  80. 80. Burns<br />
  81. 81. BURNS<br />The first step is to put out the fire by suffocating it or dowsing it with water.<br />Then determine the degree of the burn and the damage to the skin.  <br />Burns are categorized as first-, second-, or third-degree. <br />
  82. 82. TYPES OF BURNS<br />First-degree burn- The least serious burns are those in which only the outer layer of skin is burned. The skin is usually red, with swelling and it is painful.   The skin is dry without blisters.  <br />
  83. 83. TYPES OF BURNS<br />Second-degree burn-Second-degree burns are more serious and involve the skin layers beneath the top layer.  These burns produce blisters, severe pain, and redness.<br />
  84. 84. TYPES OF BURNS<br />Third-degree burn- The most serious burn.  These burns are painless (due to nerve damage) and involve all layers of the skin. The burned area may be charred brown, leathery or appear dry and white.<br />
  85. 85. DONT’S<br />Important:   -  Don't apply butter or ointments to the burn to ensure proper healing of the burned skin.  -  Don't break blisters to prevent infection.  -  Don't use ice to prevent destruction to the skin.  -  Don't immerse large severe burns in cold water to prevent shock.<br />
  86. 86. Until an emergency unit arrives, follow these steps:<br />  Make sure the victim is no longer in contact with the burning material or exposed to smoke or heat.   -  Don't immerse large severe burns in cold water to prevent shock.  -  Check for signs of circulation and if there is no breathing or other sign of circulation, proceed with CPR.     -  If possible, raise the burned body part above heart level.  -  Use a cool, moist bandage to cover the burned area.<br />Make sure they stay warm so cover them all up with coats or something. Even small burns will make you feel COLD everywhere.<br />
  87. 87. Sprains, Strains & Fractures<br />
  88. 88. First Aid – Sprains, Strains & Fractures, they all look alike?<br />
  89. 89. Sprains & Strains <br />Sprain is an injury which occurs as a result of stretching or tearing of ligaments.  <br />Strain is an injury which occurs as a result of stretching or tearing of muscles. <br />
  90. 90. How to treat Fractures<br />They may be Closed<br />Skin is not broken. Secure fracture using a stable object for comfort. Using a piece of T Shirt. Secure the finger from above the fix to below.<br />
  91. 91. They may be Open: <br />Splint the leg for immobility, taking care not to move the bone ends any more than is absolutely necessary. <br />When bones break (and especially the femur), they often release fat into the bloodstream, which in turn can cause some disorientation and panic -- be ready for this and restrain if necessary.<br />
  92. 92. The symptoms<br />The symptoms are mild to severe pain, stiffness, swelling and/or bruising.  Generally, it is hard to differentiate fracture vs. sprained/strained, however for the purposes of first aid administration the method of treatment is the same.  Therefore, when talking about sprain/strain, differ the diagnosis, and assume it can be a break, and vice versa.   <br />
  93. 93. First Aid: to Fractures, sprains & Strains<br />If the person is unresponsive, isn't breathing or isn't moving, proceed with CPR<br />If bleeding, stop the bleeding by applying pressure to the wound with a sterile bandage or a clean cloth<br />Apply a bag of ice to the injured area for up to 20 minutes, with a towel (paper or cloth) between the skin and ice<br />NO ICE….then send the guy on the scene that is freaking out to go get ICE.<br />If raising the injured part does not cause more pain to the victim, attempt to raise it<br />If the person feels faint or is breathing in short, rapid breaths lay the person down with the head slightly lower than the trunk and, if possible, elevate the legs<br />    <br />
  94. 94. NOTE<br />Reducing a compound fracture in the field is beyond the scope of this seminar.** In cases of femur fractures, the body may lose two pints of blood from your circulatory system and may send the victim into shock, in order to help the pain of a femur fracture, pull by the foot, it will initially hurt but the victim will be relieved that their bones are no longer crunching. Do not release this until emergency personnel come with a traction splint.<br />
  95. 95. Femur Fracture<br />
  96. 96. How to make bandages and bandage with out TAPE<br />
  97. 97. How to make strong Cravat Bandage- if not just tear strips from a shirt<br />
  98. 98. Types of bandages for various hurtsThe Hand<br />
  99. 99. Roller Bandage for the Ankle and Foot<br />
  100. 100. Cravat Bandage for the Elbow or Knee<br />
  101. 101. Cravat Bandage for the Arm, Forearm, Leg, or Thigh<br />
  102. 102. SPLINTS<br />
  103. 103. SPLINTS- ON THE STREET<br />Body work<br />Wood/branches<br />Card board<br />Newspaper<br />ECT…<br />
  104. 104. Impaled Objects<br />
  105. 105. Stabilize Impaled Objects<br />Do not attempt to move or remove the object. Stabilize the impaled body part.<br />Control bleeding and stabilize the object in place using soft dressings, gauze, and/or tape.<br /> Yeah Right….Let’s get real.<br />Use any clothes you can to stabilize and secure the dressings in place by tearing up a T-shirt to be used as tape.<br />
  106. 106. Abrasions- just keep from bleeding<br />
  107. 107. Amputations<br />Put on latex gloves to prevent the spread of infectious disease.<br />Apply direct pressure and elevate the stump to stop the bleeding. Amputations may have anything from mild bleeding to very severe bleeding. <br />Leave the wound open (do not attempt to close it), but cover it with a bulky bandage. <br />
  108. 108. Save the Amputated Body Part<br />Rinse the amputated body part with disinfected water if you can. <br />Wrap the amputated body part in dry sterile gauze if you can.<br />Place the wrapped body part in a clean and waterproof plastic bag and seal the bag if you can.<br />Place the sealed plastic bag in ice water, making sure no water can get into the bag and that the body part does not get wet. Do not place the body part on ice, or it may freeze or be injured by the cold if you can.<br />Transport the body part to the hospital along with the injured person.<br />
  109. 109. Avulsion-wrap it up<br />
  110. 110. Crush Injuries- wrap it up<br />
  111. 111. Dislocations-stabilize and secure to body<br />
  112. 112. Stabilize and secure to body ask victim what feels better<br />
  113. 113. Eye injuries<br />
  114. 114. What do I do?<br />Gently bandage the eye you may add some water to the cloth so it doesn’t stick to cloth.<br />Do not apply pressure.<br />Instruct them not to rub his/her eye. <br />Do not try to remove any particles from their eye. <br />Do not wash out the eye.<br />
  115. 115. Lacerations- control bleeding and wrap up… kind of tight<br />
  116. 116. Law Enforcement<br />
  117. 117. Dealing with Law Enforcement<br />
  118. 118. Dealing with Law Enforcement<br />Identify yourself as the one who was “in charge”.<br />Let them know if you moved the bike off the road or anything like that.<br />Work with them as much as you can…remember it was a black dog that ran out in front of him/her….teehee<br />
  119. 119. DEALING WITH EMS<br />
  120. 120. When the Ambulance arrives<br />EMT’s and Paramedics are in charge now..thank GOD no more stress<br />Give factual account of accident<br />Give them all of the information you might have written down or have remembered this is the U-ABCC, personal information about the victim<br />
  121. 121. When the Ambulance arrives<br />Give EMS a honest evaluation of drug/alcohol consumption<br />Stay back and let them get to work and try to stay out of the way <br /> Most important let EMS know if the fluids got into an open wound<br />I hope EMS thanks all of you for doing such a GREAT job…I would.<br />
  122. 122. STATISTICS<br />
  123. 123. Statistical Analysis Center<br />
  124. 124. Statistical Analysis Center<br />
  125. 125. US Statistical Analysis Center<br />Motorcyclists make up 2% of road traffic.<br />Only 2% of registered vehicles are motorcycles, yet they make up 11.3% of all motor vehicle deaths <br />Motorcyclists are 20 times more likely to be injured themselves and 35 times more likely to be killed or seriously injured. <br />
  126. 126. RIDER SAFETY<br />
  127. 127. RIDER SAFETY----RESEARCH!!<br />Wearing reflective or fluorescent clothing.(reduces crash injury by 37%) <br />White or light colored helmets.(reduces by 19%) **compared to using a black helmet**<br />
  128. 128. ARRIVE ALIVE<br />
  129. 129. What would Sue do to stay safe?<br />MOST important I RIDE MY OWN RIDE!!!<br />I will always Remember there is always going to be a bigger fish that will ride better than me, be faster than me and look better than me. Please “ARIVE ALIVE”!<br />I will never be as fast as…<br />I accept it and I choose to<br /> LIVE another day or… warning next content is extremely graphic<br />
  130. 130. You do not want this to happen to you<br />
  131. 131. No one is ever completely out of risk of injury. Disaster can strike anytime, anywhere.<br />
  132. 132. Sorry, this can be too much….isn’t she cute!!!<br />
  133. 133. CARRY IMPORTANT INFO<br />
  134. 134. I WOULD PLACE MY INFORMATION ABOUT MYSELF<br />THREE PLACES…<br />a. IN MY TANK BAG<br />b. IN MY HELMET<br />c. UNDER THE TAIL SECTION OF MY BIKE<br />
  135. 135. What does it contain????<br />Copy of my drivers license<br />My husbands cell phone #<br />My sister’s cell phone # <br />Medical history<br />Medications that I take<br />Hey Doc…PLEASE NO MEDICAL STUDENTS!!!<br />
  136. 136. Live another day…<br />
  137. 137. To find a road like this<br />
  138. 138. Disclaimer<br />This seminar was designed to give us the basic background and some guidelines to follow so that we can be the calm person who has some idea of what needs to be done without overreacting. <br />All of this should be regarded as ``guidelines''; real situations may require adaptation in the field. <br />Thanks for you time…<br />NOW SHUT UP AND RIDE<br />
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