BIOMEDICAL SCIENCE ACADEMY<br />Student Classroom Syllabi/Handbook<br />1517650131445<br />     2010 -2011<br />PIONEER TE...
Inspiration Activity – any of the ones we did in Unit 1 will work
3 Career Journals of your choice
EKG print out with data table and Analysis of EKGs from conclusion question 3
Heart Dissection pictures/notes
Heart Diagrams
Heart Rate Formal Lab Report</li></ul>Other Things to Keep In Your Portfolio:<br /><ul><li>Any Summer Camp Completion Cert...
Resume – continue to add onto it as you go!
Recommendations/Awards/Recognition from teachers
Pictures of you doing the activities – see me for pictures if you don’t have them – I may.</li></ul>How To Set Up Your Por...
The year of your graduation
The title – Biomedical Sciences Portfolio and course name i.e. Principles of Biomedical Science
You may decorate the page if you would like</li></ul>Table of Contents<br /><ul><li>You MUST have a TYPED table of contents
This also means that your pages should be numbered somehow – stickers or labels on the page protector are fine, as is numb...
DO NOT HAND WRITE THE PAGE NUMBERS ON THE PAGES!!!</li></ul>Resume (Optional):- You must include the following on your res...
An objective – ex. To be accepted into a premed program at a University
Name of High School with dates attended (2009 – present)
GPA and/or ACT score (if taken)
List of current classes
List of extracurricular activities – The Sixth Element  club, HOSA, Football, Basketball, etc.
List of awards and recognitions – Honor Roll, etc.</li></ul>Career Journals – add 2 career journals to the ones you curren...
Don’t forget to redo the reflections to discuss why you added these 2</li></ul>Other Activities:<br /><ul><li>You MUST hav...
You may choose any 3 that you would like
You MUST TYPE A REFLECTION FOR EACH ACTIVITY – same info as last time:
What was the background/reason for completing the assignment
What did you learn from the assignment – what skills did you develop
How will this activity help you as you pursue your career</li></ul>Organization<br /><ul><li>Be sure to have things organi...
CLEAN COPIES ARE A MUST
Everything should be in a page protector
Don’t forget – 1 page(if double sided) – 2 pages (if not double sided) per protector
ALL REFELECTIONS ARE TYPED AND 3 paragraphs in length</li></ul>EXTRA CREDIT<br />     Extra credit is not available in thi...
Students are encouraged not to eat in the Laboratory areas.</li></ul>Disposal of Wastes:<br />Do not dispose of chemicals ...
PRINCIPLES OF BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES - HANDBOOK
PRINCIPLES OF BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES - HANDBOOK
PRINCIPLES OF BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES - HANDBOOK
PRINCIPLES OF BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES - HANDBOOK
PRINCIPLES OF BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES - HANDBOOK
PRINCIPLES OF BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES - HANDBOOK
PRINCIPLES OF BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES - HANDBOOK
PRINCIPLES OF BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES - HANDBOOK
PRINCIPLES OF BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES - HANDBOOK
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PRINCIPLES OF BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES - HANDBOOK

  1. 1. BIOMEDICAL SCIENCE ACADEMY<br />Student Classroom Syllabi/Handbook<br />1517650131445<br /> 2010 -2011<br />PIONEER TECHNOLOGY CENTER<br />TABLE OF CONTENTS PAGE No.<br />TABLE OF CONTENTS<br />INSTRUCTOR’S INFORMATION 3<br />WELCOME STATEMENT 4<br />PBS SYLLABI5 – 11<br />GRANT PROPOSAL AND AGREEMENT 12-16<br />PORTFOLIO ASSIGNMENT 17-21<br />CAREER JOURNALS A-DAY 22-25<br />CLASSROOM EXPECTATIONS AND <br />STATEMENT OF UNDERSTANDING <br />AGREEMENT26-30<br />ADDITIONAL INFORMATION31-32<br />LABORATORY EXPECTATIONS<br />AND UNDERSTANING OF<br />AGREEMENT 33-39<br />DAILY PREFORMANCE EVALUATION40-41<br /> <br />PROGRAM: PRINCIPLES OF BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES<br /> (Project Lead the Way)<br />COURSE ACRONYM: PBS<br />INSTRUCTIONAL TIME: 120 hours<br />INSTRUCTOR: Mrs. N. Sweetman, RN, BSN, MS.Ed<br /> Biomedical Sciences Academy,<br /> Pioneer Technology Center,<br /> 2101, N.Ash<br /> Ponca City, OK 74601 <br /> (580) 718-4225 (office)<br /> (580) 340-1044 (cell)<br /> E-mail address: mias@pioneerteh.org<br />PREREQUISTIES: None (Biology I preferred but not required)<br />WELCOME to Project Lead the Way and the Biomedical Science Academy Program. Pioneer Technology Center (PTC) is very excited to be introducing a program that prepares students for a career in biotechnology, medicine or a health related field. <br />Project Lead the Way is a national, not-for-profit educational program that assists high-school students in developing strong backgrounds in science and engineering. This dynamic program uses hands-on, real world curriculum to engage and challenge students to achieve their highest potential.<br />Teachers are required to train for the courses Project Lead the Way offers. . I spent the month of July in Maryland training for Principles of Biomedical Science, Human Body Systems and Biomedical Innovations. As a result, this year between Mrs. Sawyer and I all four courses will be offered at PTC for the first time. The courses are rigorous and challenging. Although intensive, they will increase student motivation, cooperative learning skills, higher-order thinking and enhance overall improvement providing optimum student achievement.<br />I am a registered nurse with a bachelor’s degree in nursing and 30 years of experience in a variety of health care settings. I have a Master of Science in Teaching, Learning and Leadership and have been teaching high school students for approximately 6 years. I, also, continue to work as an Emergency nurse at Integris Blackwell Medical Center. <br />As a health care worker and teacher, I am able to offer clinical observations which allow students exposure to this expansive industry. In conjunction with Project Lead the Way, PTC will provide the opportunity for students to experience the world of science and medicine by applying knowledge in real-world situations as they advance through the pathways. <br />The following is the link to Project Lead the Way. Please visit the website for information regarding the Biomedical Science Academy Program.<br />http://www.pltw.org/Biomedical/biomedical.cfm<br />1162050106680<br />PBS SYLLABI<br />COURSE DESCRIPTION:<br />Student work involves the study of human medicine, research processes and an introduction to bioinformatics. The students will investigate the human body systems and various health conditions including:<br />Heart disease,<br />Diabetes,<br />Sickle-cell disease, <br />Hypercholesterolemia, <br /> Infectious diseases. <br />A theme through the course is to determine the factors that led to the death of Anna Garcia. After determining the factors responsible for the death, the students investigate lifestyle choices and medical treatments that might have prolonged the person’s life. <br />Key biological concepts include the following:<br />Homeostasis, <br />Metabolism,<br />Inheritance of traits,<br />Feedback systems, <br />Relationship of structure to function,<br />Defense against disease.<br /> The course is designed to provide an overview of all the courses in the Biomedical Sciences Academy and to lay the scientific foundation necessary for student success in the subsequent courses. Exploring science in action, students will work through interesting real world cases and often play the role of biomedical professionals to solve medical mysteries.<br /> <br />COURSE OBJECTIVE:<br />The Principles of the Biomedical Sciences (PBS) course is divided into eight units designed to introduce students to the study of the human body and human medicine. The following is a description of each unit in the PBS course.<br /> Unit 1 – Human Body Systems<br />Unit one provides the foundation and develops the theme for the course. Students are engaged by reading about woman who is found dead in the entry to her house. In order to determine how she died the students are introduced to seven major human body systems: cardiovascular, digestive, endocrine, immune, nervous, respiratory, and urinary. Students explore the meaning of the term system and investigate the interrelatedness of human body systems. Students begin to develop effective skills in conducting internet research, documenting scientific sources, and summarizing key ideas.<br /> Unit 2 – Heart Disease<br />During unit two, students focus on the circulatory system. Students look at the role of this system in maintaining homeostasis by examining the structure and function of the heart and the engineering principles of fluid mechanics involved in pumping blood efficiently. Students are introduced to experimental design and LabVIEW software to collect and analyze heart data including: heart rate, blood pressure, and EKG.<br /> <br />Unit 3 – Diabetes<br />In this unit students investigate the serious effects a disease within one system can have on homeostasis in the body as a whole. The disease studied is diabetes. Students are introduced to basic chemistry, the biochemistry of macromolecules, and the relationship of these molecules to metabolic function. The causes, symptoms, treatments and effects of diabetes are studied as well as the life style implications associated with this disease. The engineering principles involved in feedback loops are discussed and related to insulin and glucose. <br /> <br />Unit 4 – Sickle Cell Disease<br />Genetics is the focus of this unit which uses Sickle Cell Disease as a tool to gain an understanding of the inheritance of traits. Students are introduced to bioinformatics as they explore the role of genes in determining the structure and function of proteins. Students build models of DNA and the beta-globin protein as they study the structure, function, and interrelatedness of nucleic acids and proteins. To study the impact of mutations they analyze karyotypes and explore the effects of single base-pair mutations. <br /> <br /> Unit 5 – Hypercholesterolemia<br />In unit 5, students look at the function of cholesterol in the body and its role in heart disease. DNA technologies including polymerase chain reaction (PCR), restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis, and DNA electrophoresis are introduced as students complete activities dealing with the familial hypercholesterolemia gene. <br /> <br />Unit 6 – Infectious Diseases<br />Bacteria and viruses, the causative agents of infectious diseases, are the focus of unit six. Structural differences between these organisms are examined as students Gram stain bacteria and produce models of virus particles. The differences in treatment protocols for bacterial and viral diseases are investigated. Students produce a public health campaign to educate peers about the dangers and the prevention of an infectious disease.<br /> Unit 7 – Medical Interventions<br />Medical interventions past and present are explored in this unit including surgery, medication, technology, and life style choice. The focus of the work is how medical interventions have changed over time to prolong and improve the quality of life. Students explore how a new pharmaceutical treatment goes from initial discovery to market, and research medical interventions currently available for common diseases or disorders including heart disease, sickle cell disease, hypercholesterolemia, and infectious diseases. The connections between engineering and biomedical sciences are introduced as students explore the design and development of various medical devices including prosthetics, artificial skin, insulin pumps, joint replacements, and heart pacemakers.<br />Unit 8 – Grant Proposal<br />Funding medical research through the grant writing process is the focus of unit eight. In teams, students prepare a written grant proposal and give an oral presentation supporting the proposal, based on a disease topic of their choice. The grant proposal is based on a National Institutes of Health grant structure. This is an in-depth research project completed over a lengthy period of time. The final proposal is presented to a Grant Evaluation Committee consisting of community members employed in medical, healthcare, education, or business professions.<br /> <br />INSTRUCTIONAL PROCEDURES:<br /> Instructional materials may include but not limited to individual learning activity packets, lecture, worksheets, visual aids, outside speakers and Internet access. The student learner participation in the form of questions, reinforcement of academic skills, discussion of related experiences, and small group work will be encouraged. The student learner is encouraged to supplement these activities with other resources in the library or Internet. The student learner will perform return and complete assigned hands-on tasks.<br />EVALUATION OF STUDENT ACHIEVEMENTS AND GRADING SYSTEM:<br /> The instructor of this course assumes responsibility to provide explicit information regarding expectations of students on required assignments and activities and dates for completion.<br />The major obligation of the student is to demonstrate proficiency while meeting the requirements for this course. Included in this obligation is the necessity of meeting timetables for completion of activities, assignments, and tests. Students who need additional help should notify the instructor who will provide additional assistance.<br />Breakdown of 1st 9 weeks grade Grades:<br /> The following sale will be used to assign grades at the end of the 1st nine weeks.<br />30% - Daily Performance A= 100% - 90%<br />50% - Labs/Tests B = 89% - 80%<br />30% - Class work/Career Journal/Homework<br /> Quizzes C = 79% - 70%<br />20% - Presentations and Projects D = 69% - 60%<br /> F = 59% and Below<br />ADDITIONAL BREAK DOWN OF GRADES:<br />Performance grade is worth 5 points each day. A daily performance sheet will be provided with detail instructions, to the student daily in which the student will record their daily evaluation by using the daily performance criteria.<br />Homework needs to be completed on the due date for full credits. Any late homework/assignments will result in students receiving ½ a credit.<br />Quizzes are worth 1 point per question.<br />Conclusion questions are worth 5 points per question – If, the student does not provide an adequate answer pertaining to the question the student will lose all 5 points. In addition, for each incorrect spelling (1/2 points) will be deducted. For incomplete sentences 1piont will be deducted.<br />Tests will be administered in many forms, for example, multiple choices, scientific report, journal writing ect, This means that test will be graded according to the assignments and students will be informed prior to taking the test.<br />Laboratory activities are worth 100 points. A student will be pulled out of laboratory activities, if any safety violations occur and they will receive a zero for that particular laboratory activity and then ½ a credit if the laboratory activity is made up later. Labs. missed due to school activities can be made up and students will receive full credits. Labs. that are missed due to “other” reasons will receive ½ credits unless there is legitimate conditions, such as, death in the family, doctor’s note ect.<br />Projects, concept maps, oral presentations and career journals will be graded using the PLTW rubric criteria, unless there are special circumstances that may not warren the use of rubrics.<br />The final Grant Presentation and the End of Course exam will be counted x2 in the student’s overall grade.<br />GRANT PROPOSAL<br /> Funding medical research through the grant writing process is the focus of unit eight. In teams, students prepare a written grant proposal and give an oral presentation supporting the proposal, based on a disease topic of their choice. The grant proposal is based on a National Institutes of Health grant structure. This is an in-depth research project completed over a lengthy period of time. The final proposal is presented to a Grant Evaluation Committee consisting of community members employed in medical, healthcare, education, or business professions and parents.<br /> Students will be required to complete a grant proposal as one of the culminating projects of the course. The grant proposal will be done in groups of no more than 2-3 students; however each student will receive an individual grade on the project. The grant proposal idea and background will be presented to the students during the beginning of the 2nd nine weeks, and there will be check points throughout the duration of the project. The final proposal will be included on the student’s 2rd nine weeks grade. The grading scale will be adjusted as follows:<br />Breakdown of 2rd nine weeks grade: <br />30% - Daily Performance<br />50%- Tests, Quizzes and Labs<br />15% - Class work/Career Journals/ Homework<br />10% - Presentations and Projects <br /> 25% -Grant Proposal<br />ADDITIONAL BREAK DOWN OF GRADES:<br />Performance grade is worth 5 points each day. A daily performance sheet will be provided with detail instructions, to the student daily in which the student will record their daily evaluation by using the daily performance criteria.<br />Homework needs to be completed on the due date for full credits. Any late homework/assignments will result in students receiving ½ a credit.<br />Quizzes are worth 1 point per question.<br />Conclusion questions are worth 5 points per question – If, the student does not provide an adequate answer pertaining to the question the student will lose all 5 points. In addition, for each incorrect spelling (1/2 points) will be deducted. For incomplete sentences 1piont will be deducted.<br />Tests will be administered in many forms, for example, multiple choices, scientific report, journal writing ect, This means that test will be graded according to the assignments and students will be informed prior to taking the test.<br />Laboratory activities are worth 100 points. A student will be pulled out of laboratory activities, if any safety violations occur and they will receive a zero for that particular laboratory activity and then ½ a credit if the laboratory activity is made up later. Labs. missed due to school activities can be made up and students will receive full credits. Labs. that are missed due to “other” reasons will receive ½ credits unless there is legitimate conditions, such as, death in the family, doctor’s note ect.<br />Projects, concept maps, oral presentations and career journals will be graded using the PLTW rubric criteria, unless there are special circumstances that may not warren the use of rubrics.<br />The final Grant Presentation and the End of Course exam will be counted x2 in the student’s overall grade.<br /> Students are required to keep backup copies of all their assignments until the end of the semester. All written assignments should be in the form of complete sentences. Contractions and abbreviated words are not acceptable and this will result in loss of valuable points.  <br /> All submitted work must be in your own words. If you work with a partner on an assignment/project that requires individual submission, you must submit your own document with your partners name on it. In addition, you must use your own words and thoughts as much as possible to answer the questions or write any reports – otherwise copying from other students’ means plagiarism -a serious offence, which can result in students receiving a zero and a teacher/student conference with parent and program Director involvement. <br /> ALL students need to be aware that ALL assignments are due at the beginning or end of class on the due date. Assignments submitted online must be submitted before midnight on the due date. Late assignments need to be completed within a set time and students will receive ½ a credit. Students who do not turn in late assignments will be conference with me (Mrs. Sweetman), Mrs. Evans and/or either Mrs. Stauffer. Parents will be notified via telephone/E-mail or Text message.<br /> A unit quiz and/or test will be administered after completion of each Unit in a form of multiple choices, laboratory reports, and research or by presentations. Students need to be aware that late quizzes are worth full credit but late tests are worth only 50%.<br />****The details of this syllabus, including topics covered, calendar, and grading rubrics are subject to change. You will be informed of any changes in class. ****<br />GRANT PROPOSAL DEADLINES<br />AND<br />AGREEMENT<br />6286505715<br /> Funding for medical research has resulted in huge advancements in medical care and treatment. As a result of this amazing progress, longevity and quality of life in the United States has steadily improved through-out the last century. At the same time, the cost of this research has increased tremendously. New and continuing medical challenges face our society every day. Cancer, AIDS, Heart Disease, Arthritis, and Diabetes are just a few of the continuing diseases we struggle with. New and emerging infectious diseases are continually appearing on the planet as pathogenic microbes evolve.<br /> <br /> Medical research is largely funded through the grant process. Hundreds of millions of dollars in grant monies are awarded each year to researchers all over the U.S. The National Institutes of Health (NIH), for example, is one of the agencies awarding huge sums of money to support research. In 2006, the NIH awarded $100 million to pre-existing research programs and more than that to new projects in every area of medical care and treatment.<br /> <br /> The Center for Disease Control (CDC) is another major funding source. As an illustration, in the past few years, the CDC has awarded $3 million to one cancer prevention program as well as millions more to many others. The CDC has given $2.6 million to the University of Minnesota to study improvements in adolescent health, $4 million to the University of Pittsburg for Neurological Injury research, $9 million to various research programs to study Bio-defense and emerging infectious diseases, $4 million for Arthritis research and $350,000 for Driving Under the Influence (DUI) prevention. These examples represent just a few of the thousands of research projects funded by the CDC.<br /> <br /> Competition for the awards is high and the grant writing process is complex and demanding. In this Lesson, students will delve deeper into the process of grant writing that they were introduced to in Unit Three. This Unit has only one Lesson with one problem. It is meant to be done over an extended period of time and is the culminating work for year one. The students will be working as part of a team and will create a detailed, written proposal following the guidelines given. The teams will present the work orally in the form of a presentation made to a board of invited guests. The guest panel will ultimately decide upon a “winning” grant.<br /> <br /> This is a major project and students will need to meet deadlines, submit on going work, complete research and writing outside of the classroom and participate effectively as part of a team. <br />DUE DATES<br /><ul><li>10/1/2010 Grant Proposal Topic:</li></ul>One paragraph typed and double spaced explaining what topic the group will be covering. Students must include a general over view of what information they believe they will need to gather. <br />Draft Purpose Statement and Title<br /><ul><li>10/15/2010Final Purpose Statement and Title</li></ul>Potential Grant Proposal Resources<br />Draft Problem Statement<br />Revised Grant Proposal Resources<br /><ul><li>11/5/2010Final Problem Statement</li></ul>Draft Project Methodology<br />Revised Grant Proposal Resources<br />Draft Summary and Evaluation<br />Revised Grant Proposal Resources<br /><ul><li>11/19/2010Final Project Methodology</li></ul>Revised Grant Proposal Resources<br />Final Summary and Evaluation<br />Draft Available Resources<br /><ul><li>12/3/2010Final Available Resources</li></ul>Draft Project Overview<br />Revised Grant Proposal Resources<br />Final Project Overview<br />Final Grant Proposal Resources<br />Final Grant Proposal Due<br /><ul><li>**12/15/2010**Grant Proposal Presentation</li></ul>**Dates are tentative, and are subject to change**<br /> Students are expected to be in attendance the day of their scheduled Proposal Presentation. Students will be expected to follow all guidelines and rubrics to the best of their ability. If for some reason a student feels that a group member is either not completing their portion of the assignments to a satisfactory level or that a group member is bullying, intimidating, or otherwise adversely affecting the group the student(s) need to contact their teacher immediately. However minor an allegation may be all will be taken seriously however, please do your best to resolve minor issues within your group itself, but if the situation is at a level or evolves to a level where the team members cannot function properly as a team please seek your Teacher’s help. <br />Grant Proposal Agreement<br />I ______________________ (student) agree to follow the guidelines set forth to the best of my ability and to cooperate as a fully participating and functioning member of my team, for the good of myself and my team members. <br />Student Signature: ______________________________<br />Parent Signature: ______________________________<br />__________________________<br />Team Member<br />__________________________<br />Team Member<br />6794504445<br />ASSIGNMENT<br />ASSIGNMENT<br />ASSIGNMENT<br /> All Biomedical science Academy students will keep a portfolio of selected work that they have done during the semester. The student will be responsible for bringing a three binder folder of their own choice on the first day of PLTW activity.<br /> Each Portfolio section will contain the following:<br />Labs<br />Classroom activities/pictures<br />Career Journals<br />Certificate Awards and Achievements<br /> Each activity will have a reflection and description of the activity. They should include the following:<br />What was the background/reason for completing the assignment<br />What did you learn from the assignment? – What skills did develop?<br />How will this activity help you as you purse your career <br />Career Journal Reflections:<br />You will not reflect on the careers themselves, but discuss why you chose to highlight these 3 careers.<br />What Must Be In Your Portfolio for the First Turn-In (October 13th, 2010):<br /><ul><li>Unit 1 Activities/Guest speakers pictures/notes
  2. 2. Inspiration Activity – any of the ones we did in Unit 1 will work
  3. 3. 3 Career Journals of your choice
  4. 4. EKG print out with data table and Analysis of EKGs from conclusion question 3
  5. 5. Heart Dissection pictures/notes
  6. 6. Heart Diagrams
  7. 7. Heart Rate Formal Lab Report</li></ul>Other Things to Keep In Your Portfolio:<br /><ul><li>Any Summer Camp Completion Certificate if you attended
  8. 8. Resume – continue to add onto it as you go!
  9. 9. Recommendations/Awards/Recognition from teachers
  10. 10. Pictures of you doing the activities – see me for pictures if you don’t have them – I may.</li></ul>How To Set Up Your Portfolio<br /><ul><li>Dividers should be used, labeled (typed) and in the order listed above</li></ul>Each activity page should be in a page protector. You may place 2 pages in one protector if they are only 1-sided. Papers that are 2-sided should be placed in their own page protector so that both sides of the paper can be seen.<br />After each activity, should be your reflection page (also in a page protector).<br />Everything is to be typed – with exception of the actual activities that you wrote on or the lab notebook pages.<br /><ul><li>Please be sure to have clean copies of everything – no food/drink spills, no work with comments from me on it, no doodles on the edges, etc.</li></ul>** You will want to redo anything you may have done poorly on or that you did not understand. Please note that you have 3 weeks to do this so there is plenty of time to ask questions or see me after school for help.<br />Title Page – Your title page must include the following and be TYPED:<br /><ul><li>Your first , Middle initial and last name
  11. 11. The year of your graduation
  12. 12. The title – Biomedical Sciences Portfolio and course name i.e. Principles of Biomedical Science
  13. 13. You may decorate the page if you would like</li></ul>Table of Contents<br /><ul><li>You MUST have a TYPED table of contents
  14. 14. This also means that your pages should be numbered somehow – stickers or labels on the page protector are fine, as is numbering the actual paper itself using Word®
  15. 15. DO NOT HAND WRITE THE PAGE NUMBERS ON THE PAGES!!!</li></ul>Resume (Optional):- You must include the following on your resume:<br /><ul><li>Your name
  16. 16. An objective – ex. To be accepted into a premed program at a University
  17. 17. Name of High School with dates attended (2009 – present)
  18. 18. GPA and/or ACT score (if taken)
  19. 19. List of current classes
  20. 20. List of extracurricular activities – The Sixth Element club, HOSA, Football, Basketball, etc.
  21. 21. List of awards and recognitions – Honor Roll, etc.</li></ul>Career Journals – add 2 career journals to the ones you currently have. You may also interchange any that you would like. <br /><ul><li>This means you have a total of 5 career journals
  22. 22. Don’t forget to redo the reflections to discuss why you added these 2</li></ul>Other Activities:<br /><ul><li>You MUST have 3 new activities added to the portfolio
  23. 23. You may choose any 3 that you would like
  24. 24. You MUST TYPE A REFLECTION FOR EACH ACTIVITY – same info as last time:
  25. 25. What was the background/reason for completing the assignment
  26. 26. What did you learn from the assignment – what skills did you develop
  27. 27. How will this activity help you as you pursue your career</li></ul>Organization<br /><ul><li>Be sure to have things organized in the proper place
  28. 28. CLEAN COPIES ARE A MUST
  29. 29. Everything should be in a page protector
  30. 30. Don’t forget – 1 page(if double sided) – 2 pages (if not double sided) per protector
  31. 31. ALL REFELECTIONS ARE TYPED AND 3 paragraphs in length</li></ul>EXTRA CREDIT<br /> Extra credit is not available in this course. Extra credit assignments often distract students because they take time away from that which should be spent on the regular assignments. They promote increased understanding of related topics at the expense of the most important topics. The topics and assignments listed in the syllabus have been selected as the best way to meet the course objectives. <br />REQUIRED TEXTS, MATERIALS, SUPPLIES:<br /> Required text books will be provided to all students. All text and curriculum for the PBS program is considered copyrighting by Project Lead the Way. <br />All required equipment, materials, supplies, computers and software will be provided by Pioneer Technology Center for use by the students (providing all computer regulations and safety guidelines and laboratory procedures are followed as stated in the Safety Lab or as above).<br />Student supplies:Laboratory Journal (Provided by PTC)<br />Pencils and pens<br />1 2” three ring binder for Portfolio<br /> 12” three ring binder for PLTW<br />***The details of this syllabus, including topics covered, calendar and sequences of the course are subject to change. You will be informed in class of any changes. ***<br />12382505080<br /> JOURNALS A-DAY<br /><ul><li>CAREERSDUE DATESEmergency Medical Technician (EMT)Coroner911 Operator (Dispatcher)Activity 1.1.2- Career Journal 8/23/2010Forensic Pathologist or Medical ExaminerToxicologistMorgue AssistantActivity 1.1.8—Career Journal8/30/2010EKG TechnicianMedical Data AnalystCardiac TechnicianActivity 2.3.5—Career Journal9/09/2010CardiologistCardiac Nurse SpecialistHistology TechnicianActivity 2.4.4 —Career Journal9/13/2010 Food TechnologistFood Scientists Activity 3.1.5—Career Journal 9/20/2010CAREERSDUE DATESEndocrinologistDiabetes Health CounselorActivity 3.4.5—Career Journal9/29/2010NutritionistDiabetes Clinical EducatorDiabetes Care SpecialistActivity 3.5.3– Career Journal10/05/2010EpidemiologistClinical Laboratory TechnicianHematologistActivity 4.1.4—Career Journal10/12/2010Clinical GeneticistGenetic CounselorBiostatisticianActivity 4.2.7 -Career Journal10/20/2010 Molecular BiologistEvolutionary BiologistActivity 4.3.5-Career Journal 11/01/201Consumer Information DirectorDietitianPersonal TrainerActivity 5.1.3– Career Journal11/15/2010CAREERSDUE DATESBiological Sciences TechnicianBiochemical EngineerActivity 5.2.3– Career Journal11/15/2010MicrobiologistRegistered NurseMedical Laboratory TechnicianActivity 6.2.2– Career Journal12/06/2010Biomedical EngineerPharmacistPharmacy TechnicianMaterial ScientistActivity 7.1.6—Career Journal12/13/2010</li></ul>CLASSROOM <br />EXPECTATIONS<br />AND <br />STATEMENT OF UNDERSTANDING<br />1022350-1270<br />ATTENDANCE:<br />ABSENCES:<br /> There will be no make – up activities and/or Labs during class time due to the intensity and large material needed to be covered in the PBS program. Students are advised to be here on time and adhere to the monthly calendar distributed to them at the beginning of each new month. <br />Make-up Work: <br /> It is the student’s responsibility to find out what material, work, etc. was missed on days that they were absent. Students may see me either before or after class to discuss what was missed (please do not interrupt class to find out about make-up work). <br /> Homework is due at the beginning of class on the assigned due date. If you are absent on the day the homework is due, students are expected to hand in the work the following day. <br /> It is up to the student to arrange times for make-ups if they are absent for tests, labs, or quizzes. Make-up sessions should be scheduled for either before or after school and should be done immediately upon the students return. Students will be given advanced notice of upcoming Tests and Quizzes, therefore students are expected to be prepared to make-up the missed test or quiz immediately upon their return.<br /> A student who knows they will be absent from class on a particular date (due to sports, vacations, academic activities, etc.) is still expected to hand in any work that was assigned to be due for that day. You may hand in work the day before it is due, the morning of or on the return day, however, any work handed in later than the assigned time will be counted as late and a student will receive ½ credits for the first 9 weeks and then a zero for any missed Lab/activities during the second 9 weeks. <br />TARDIES:<br /> Please refer to the current student handbook for policies and procedures concerning tardiness. Students need to be aware that PTC starts at 08.00 am – 10.45 am and at 12.50 pm -15.35 pm. Students who are tardy need to get a tardy slip from the student services office prior to coming into the classroom.<br />EDUCTIONAL STANDARDS:<br /> All the Units in PBS and BI are designed to meet the Standards for Technological Literacy, National Science Education Standards, Principles and Standards for School Mathematics, and Standards for the English Language Arts.<br />CLASSROOM AND LABORATORY EXPECTED BEHAVIOR:<br /> <br />Be Prepared:<br /> Bring your notebook, pencils, pens, assignments, books, etc with you to class everyday. If you forget your homework in your car, locker, etc. you will not be permitted to go get it after the bell has rung. <br />Be Respectful and Courteous: <br /> Please remember that you are not the only one in the class, and that you are to treat others in a tolerant, considerate, courteous, respectful manner at all times. This includes being on time, not sleeping in class, doing your own work, keeping your hands to yourself, speaking in a mature manner, using appropriate language, being helpful, participating in class, etc. Also, keep in mind that the students determine much of the climate of the classroom, and their actions (spoken, written, and the use of gestures), if you wish to keep the classroom environment one conducive to learning, fun, and productivity, then please use common sense when dealing with your fellow classmates, and myself. In general treat others how you wish to be treated, but please try to think a little before acting. <br />Be Safe:<br /> It is imperative that students understand that there is to be no horse playing when doing an activity, project and/ or in the Lab. Everyone should follow the general safety precautions as listed in the Safety Lab. Student who are a danger to themselves or to others will be asked to see Mrs. Stauffer and will receive a zero for any assigned work and for their daily performance grade for that day.<br />Do Your Best:<br /> This includes every class, lab, assignment, paper, activity, etc. I expect you to try your hardest, and make you best effort. This also includes actively participating in each and every class, activity, assignment, discussion, etc. You will only get out of class as much as you put in. ASK QUESTIONS! If you don’t ask you’ll never know!<br />ACADEMIC DISHONESTY:<br /> Academic honesty is expected of all Pioneer Technology students. It is dishonest to misrepresent another person’s work as one’s own, to take credit for someone else’s work or ideas, to accept help on a test, to obtain advanced information on confidential test materials, or to intentionally harm another student’s chances for academic success. Please see the PTC student handbook for further information.<br />ELECTRONIC DEVICES:<br /> Cell phones will not be tolerated under any circumstances. They should be out of sight and out of sound – otherwise it will be the property of Pioneer Technology Center until the student is dismissed AFTER class the first time – If a student chooses to use their cell phone after the first warning it will become the property of Pioneer Technology Center for 24 hours.<br /> Laptops will be assigned to each student. Students are responsible for maintaining and adhering to the correct procedure for usage of the computers. Under no circumstances may the computers be used for anything but Project Lead the Way unless in exceptional conditions as agreed by the instructor. If the student refuses to comply with the computer regulations, the student will lose their computer privileged and dismissed from the program.<br />FOOD & DRINK:<br /> Students can drink fluids in closed containers as they will be constantly working with Laptops. However, students are encouraged not to eat in the classroom unless there are special occasions or festivals.<br />Statement of understanding due August 16th, 2010:<br /> I have read and understand the Principles of Biomedical Science (syllabi). Procedures, and Expectations and agree to abide by them in the interest of the school, and the class in maintaining a quality education for all.<br />______________________________ ______________________________<br />Students Signature Date Parent’s Signature Date<br />______________________________<br />Parent’s Signature Date<br />Questions/Comments/Concerns:<br />1441450542290ADDITIONAL INFORMATION<br />FIELD TRIPS<br />Field trips are considered a privilege. Students who have maintained a “C” or better at PTC and at their assenting High school will be able to participate. The appropriate forms need to be filled out and returned on the day specified by the instructor; otherwise the student will not be able to go.<br />ADVISORY COMMITTEE<br />The Biomedical Science Academy maintains a joint advisory committee composed of clinical professional, industry person, a current second year student and a former student, representatives from the Career Tech Department, Northern Oklahoma College and Oklahoma State University. These members collaborate twice year to provide suggestions to the instructors on current trends and industry needs as well State wide needs.<br />EDUCATIONAL ENHANCEMENT CENTER (EEC)<br />The EEC department works closely with the Biomedical Science Academy to provide work keys testing. The Biomedical Students will do a pre-test in August and a post test in May to assess the student’s strengths in three specific areas, such as, Reading, Locating Information and Math. <br />HEALTH OCCUPATIONS OF AMERICA (HOSA)<br />ALL Biomedical Students are encouraged to join the Career Tech Student Organization: HOSA at Pioneer Technology center. Students will pay a onetime fee of $15 which will allow the Science, Technology, Math and Science instructors and students to join and be actively involved.<br />16446501980565LABAROTARY EXPECTATIONS AND STATEMENT OF AGREEMENT<br />PURPOSE:<br /> Science is a hands-on laboratory class. You will be doing many laboratory activities which will require the use of hazardous chemicals and material. Safety in the science classroom is the #1 priority for students, teachers and parents. To ensure a safe science classroom, a list of rules has been developed and provided to you in this Student Safety Contract. These rules must be followed at all times. <br /> Two copies of the contract are provided. One copy must be signed by both you and a parent or guardian before you can participate in the laboratory. The second copy is to be kept in your science notebook as a constant reminder of the safety rules.<br />Conduct:<br />Do not engage in practical jokes or boisterous conduct in the laboratory.<br />Never run in the laboratory.<br />The use of personal audio or video equipment is prohibited in the laboratory – unless permission given by the instructor.<br />The performance of unauthorized experiments is strictly forbidden.<br />Do not sit on laboratory tables.<br />General Work Procedure:<br />Know emergency procedures and where the Material Safety Data System is.<br />Never work in the laboratory without the supervision of a teacher.<br />Always perform the experiments or work precisely as directed by the teacher.<br />Immediately report any spills, accidents, or injuries to a teacher.<br />Never leave experiments while in progress.<br />Never attempt to catch a falling object.<br />Be careful when handling hot glassware and apparatus in the laboratory. Hot glassware looks just like cold glassware.<br />Never point the open end of a test tube containing a substance at yourself or others.<br />Never fill a pipette using mouth suction. Always use a pipetting device.<br />Make sure no flammable solvents are in the surrounding area when lighting a flame.<br />Do not leave alcohol burners unattended.<br />Turn off all heating apparatus and water faucets when not in use.<br />Do not remove any equipment or chemicals from the laboratory.<br />Coats, bags, and other personal items must be stored in designated areas, not on the lab tables or in the aisle ways.<br />Notify the instructor of any sensitivities that you may have to particular chemicals, latex or other substances.<br />Keep the floor clear of all objects (e.g., ice, small objects, and spill liquids).<br />Housekeeping:<br />Keep work area neat and free of any unnecessary objects.<br />Thoroughly clean your laboratory work space at the end of the laboratory session.<br />Do not block the sink drains with debris.<br />Never block access to exits or emergency equipment.<br />Inspect all equipment for damage (cracks, defects, etc.) prior to use; do not use damage equipment.<br />Never pour chemical waste into the sink drains or wastebaskets without first checking with the instructor.<br />Place chemical waste in appropriately labeled waste containers.<br />Properly dispose of broken glassware and other sharp objects (e.g., syringe needles) immediately in designated containers.<br />Properly dispose of weigh boats, gloves, filter paper, and paper towels in the laboratory.<br />Apparel in the Laboratory:<br />Always wear appropriate eye protection (i.e., chemical splash goggles) in the laboratory.<br />Wear disposal gloves, as provided in the laboratory, when handling hazardous materials. Remove the gloves before exiting the laboratory.<br />Wear a full-length, long sleeved laboratory coat as provided by PTC during all laboratory activities.<br />Wear shoes that cover the whole foot; low-heeled shoes with non-slip soles are preferable. Do not wear sandals, open-toed shoes, open- back shoes, or high-heeled shoes in the laboratory.<br />Avoid wearing shirts exposing the torso, shorts, or short skirts; long pants that completely cover the legs are required.<br />Secure long hair and loose clothing (especially loose long sleeves, neck ties, or scarves).<br />Remove jewelry (especially dangling jewelry).<br />Synthetic finger nails are not recommended in the laboratory; they are made of extremely flammable polymers that can burn to completion and are not easily extinguished.<br />Contact lens should not be worn in the laboratory unless you have permission from your instructor.<br />Hygiene Practices:<br />Keep your hands away from your face, eyes, mouth, and body while using chemicals.<br />Food and drink open or closed, or gum should never be brought into the laboratory or chemical storage area.<br />Never use laboratory glassware for eating or drinking purposes <br />Never use the microwave to “pop” popcorn or warm up food.<br />Do not apply cosmetics while in the laboratory or storage area.<br />Wash hands after removing gloves, and before leaving the laboratory.<br />Remove any protective equipment (i.e., gloves, lab coat or apron, chemical slash goggles) before leaving the laboratory.<br />Chemical Handling:<br />Check the label to verify it is the correct substance before using it.<br />Wear the appropriate chemical resistant gloves before handling chemicals. Gloves are not universally protective against all chemicals.<br />If you transfer chemicals from their original containers, label chemical containers as to the contents, concentration, hazard, date, and your initials.<br />Always use a spatula or scapula to remove a solid reagent from a container.<br />Do not directly touch any chemicals with your hands.<br />Never use a metal spatula when working with peroxides. Metals will decompose explosively with peroxides.<br />Hold containers away from the body when transferring a chemical or solution from one container to another.<br />Use a hot water bath to heat flammable liquids. Never heat directly with a flame.<br />Add concentration acid to water slowly. Never add water to a concentrated acid.<br />Weigh out or remove only the amount of chemical you will need. Do not return the excess to its original container, but properly dispose of it in the appropriate waste container.<br />Never touch, taste or smell any reagents.<br />Never place the container directly under your nose and inhale the vapors.<br />Never mix or use chemicals not called for in the laboratory exercise.<br />Clean up all spills properly and promptly as instructed by the teacher.<br />Dispose of chemicals as instructed by the teacher.<br />When transporting chemicals (especially 250 ml or more), place the immediate container in a secondary container or bucket (rubber, metal or plastic) designed to be carried and large enough to hold the entire contents of the chemicals.<br />Never handle bottles that wet or too heavy for you.<br />Use equipment (glassware, alcohol burner, etc,) in the correct way, as indicated by the teacher.<br />Handling Glassware and Equipment:<br />Carry glass tubing, especially long pieces, in a vertical position to minimize the likelihood of breakage and injury.<br />Never handle broken glass with your bare hands. Use a brush and dustpan to clean up broken glass. Place broken or waste glassware in the designated glass disposal container.<br />Inserting and removing glass tubing from rubber stoppers can be dangerous. Always lubricate glassware (tubing, thistle tubes, thermometers, etc.) before attempting to insert it in a stopper. Always protect your hands with towels or cotton gloves when inserting glass tubing into, or removing it from, a rubber stopper. If a piece of glassware becomes “frozen” in a stopper, take it to your instructor for removal.<br />When removing an electrical plug from its socket, gasp the plug, not the electrical cord. Hands must be completely dry before touching an electrical switch, plug, or outlet.<br />Report damage electrical equipment immediately. Look for things such as frayed cords, exposed wires, and loose connections. Do not use damage electrical equipment.<br />Examine glassware before each use. Never use chipped or cracked glassware. Never use dirty glassware.<br />If you do not understand how to use a piece of equipment, ask the instructor for help.<br />Do not immerse hot glassware in cold water; it may shatter.<br />Food & Drink:<br /><ul><li>Students can drink fluids in closed containers as they will be constantly working with Laptops.
  32. 32. Students are encouraged not to eat in the Laboratory areas.</li></ul>Disposal of Wastes:<br />Do not dispose of chemicals in the sink. (Rule of Thumb: If you don’t want to drink it, don’t dump it in the sink). Follow your instructor’s directions for disposal. Be sure to dispose of chemicals in the proper waste collector. Do not mix chemical waste without being instructed to do so. Any container that is used to collect chemical waste must be properly labeled and closed at all times unless actively pouring into it.<br />Properly dispose of animal tissue in the red or orange Biohazard bags. Never throw animal tissue in lab garbage cans. Your instructor will provide necessary detail. <br />Dispose of broken glass in the cardboard "broken glass box" in your lab. Place “Sharps” (scalpels, needles, razorblades, etc) in the sharps boxes.<br />Do not place general trash in the any of the specialized collection containers.<br />Do not let the potential hazards listed above make you afraid to participate in the lab. If instructions are followed and care is taken, the likelihood of an accident is greatly reduced. Labs are usually the most fun part of any science course.<br />Emergency Procedure:<br />Know the location of all the exits in the laboratory, classroom and PTC building.<br />Know the location of the classroom telephone.<br />Know the location of and know how to operate the following:<br />Fire extinguishers<br />Alarm systems with pull stations<br />Fire blankets<br />Eye wash<br />Fire- aid kit<br />Deluge safety shower<br />In case of an emergency or accident, each student will need to be familiar with each of the following instructors, so that extra assistance can be obtained:<br />Mrs. SAWYER – Room 127<br />Ms. ALLAN – Room 126<br />Mrs. BENNETT – Room <br />Mrs. STAUFFER – Director of Health Services<br />Questions: Name: ____________________________<br />Do you wear contact lens? Yes___ No____<br />Are you color blind? Yes____ No____<br />Do you have any allergies? Food: Yes ____ No ___<br /> <br /> Drugs: Yes____ No ___<br /> If so, list specific allergies: __________________________________<br />Statement of Agreement On Laboratory Safety/ Expectations: Due August 16th, 2010:<br /> I, _____________________________ have read and agree to follow all of the above safety rules set forth in this contract. I realize that I must obey these rules to insure my own safety, and that of my fellow students and instructors. I will cooperate to the fullest extent with my instructor and fellow students to maintain a safe laboratory environment. I will also closely follow the oral and written instructions provided by the instructor. I am aware that any violations of this safety contract that result in unsafe conduct in the laboratory or misbehavior on my part, may result in being removed from the laboratory, receiving a failing grade, or dismissal from the course.<br />_________________________________ <br />Student Signature <br />_________________________________ _________________<br />Student Printed Name Date<br />Dear Parent or Guardian,<br /> We at Pioneer Technology Center, feel that you should be informed regarding the school’s effect to create and maintain a safe science laboratory environment.<br /> With the cooperation of the instructors, parents and students, a safety instruction program can eliminate, prevent, and correct possible hazards.<br /> You should be aware of the safety instructions your son or daughter will receive before engaging in any laboratory work. Please read the list of safety rules above. No student will be permitted to perform laboratory activities unless this contract is signed by both the student and parent/guardian and is on file with the teacher.<br /> Your signature on this contract indicates that you have:<br />Read this Student Safety Contract.<br />Are aware of the measures taken to insure the safety of your son or daughter in the science laboratory at Pioneer Technology Center.<br />Will instruct your son or daughter to uphold his/her agreement to follow these rules and procedures in the laboratory at Pioneer Technology Center. <br />_________________________________ ______________________<br />Parent/Guardian Signature Date<br />61595034290<br />EVALUATION<br />Student Name: ________________________ Week: ______________<br />Student Observations:<br />DATEPUNCTUALITY(tardy/absence)2 ptsLABCITIZENSHIP(professionalism)1 ptDAILYSCOREEquipment/SuppliesSafety1 pt1 ptMTWThF<br />Punctuality: Present and on time (2 pt)<br /> Tardy - If you arrive after the bell then you are tardy (1 pt)<br /> Absence - No call No show (0 pt) <br />Equip/Supplies: Replaces ALL equipment/supplies in their original position with no supervision (1 pt)<br /> Only replaces ½ supplies in original position (1/2 pt)<br /> Equipment/Supplies are not replaced (0 pt)<br />Safety: Adheres to the student/ PBS safety protocol (1 pt)<br /> Does not adhere to the safety protocol (0 pt)<br />Citizenship: Comes with a positive outlook, has materials and well prepared, follows <br /> Instructions without arguing or complaining (1 pt) <br /> Is absent or tardy but calls in prior to the day (1 pt)<br /> Has a negative attitude and has to be reminded to do something constantly. (0 pt)<br />Instructor Observations:<br />DATEPUNCTUALITY(tardy/absence)2 ptsLABCITIZENSHIP(professionalism)1 ptDAILYSCOREEquipment/SuppliesSafety1 pt1 ptMTWThF<br /> TOTAL WEEKLY SCORE: / 25 pts <br />

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