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PP8950-AV1.5 - COURSE SYLLABUS
 

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    PP8950-AV1.5 - COURSE SYLLABUS PP8950-AV1.5 - COURSE SYLLABUS Document Transcript

    • Argosy University<br />COURSE SYLLABUS<br />PP 8770<br />Clinical Assessment of Malingering and Deception<br />Faculty Information<br />Faculty Name: Peter Dodzik, PsyD, ABPdN, ABPN<br />Campus: Schaumburg<br />Contact Information: Office Phone: (847) 969-4935<br /> Home Phone: (312) 933-8769<br /> E-Mail address:pdodzik@edmc.edu<br />Office Hours: by appointment<br />Short Faculty Bio: Associate Professor of Clinical Psychology at the American School of Professional Psychology at Argosy University, Schaumburg Campus. He received his Doctorate in Clinical Psychology with specializations in Neuropsychology and Geropsychology from the Florida School of Professional Psychology in 2000 and his master's in Clinical Psychology from the University of Sarasota in 1998. Dr. Dodzik completed his Fellowship in Neuropsychology at Fort Wayne Neurological Center in Fort Wayne, Indiana. Dr. Dodzik is also an Assistant Clinical Professor at Indiana University School of Medicine in Fort Wayne. He is currently the director of Pediatric Neuropsychology at Fort Wayne Neurological Center in Fort Wayne, Indiana. Dr. Dodzik specializes in pediatric and neuropsychological assessment and sleep medicine. In addition to his clinical activities, Dr. Dodzik is currently involved in research related to pharmacological treatment of Alzheimer's disease and Vascular Dementia, surgical treatment for Parkinson's disease, and assessment of Developmental Dyslexia and ADHD. Dr. Dodzik has published and presented in the area of neuropsychological assessment and Sleep Medicine, including two book chapters in Sleep Psychiatry, on Dementia and ADHD with Sleep Disorders. His current teaching areas include Psychopathology, Cognitive and Affective Processes, and special topics in Pediatric Neuropsychology, Malingering and Neuroanatomy/Neuropathology. Dr. Dodzik is licensed to practice clinical psychology in Illinois and Indiana.<br />Course Information<br />Course Description: This course is designed to facilitate students’ understanding of the ways in which effort and impression management can impact test data. The course will review the various methods used in the assessment of malingering and deception. In addition, specific time will be devoted to the uses of current “traditional” psychological measures (such as the MMPI-2, Rorschach and WAIS-III) for this purpose. <br />New instruments for the assessment of malingering and inconsistent or poor effort will also be introduced along with specific data on accuracy and psychometric properties. Instruments not specifically within the prevue of psychology (such as polygraphs, drug-assisted interviews) will also be discussed along with their accuracy and reliability.<br />Course Pre-requisites: Cognitive Assessment PP 7370<br /> Personality Assessment-Objectives PP 7371<br /> Personality Assessment-Projectives PP 7372 <br /> Diagnostic Practicum Completed<br />Term: Summer I 2009<br />Class Day/Time: Friday 12:00-2:45pm<br />Course Length: 7.5 weeks <br />Contact Hours: 22.5 hours<br />Credit Value: 1.5 credits<br /> <br />Required Textbook(s) <br />Rogers, R. (2008). Clinical Assessment of Malingering and Deception, Third Edition. Guilford Press, New York. ISBN-13: 9781593856991<br />Technology <br />The following technology may be required in order to complete the course: Pentium III CPU/ Windows 98; 128MB RAM printer; Microsoft Office: Acrobat (full version); Microsoft Internet Explorer 5.5 (PC), 5.0 (MAC), or Netscape Navigator 4.08; Norton Antivirus.<br />Program Outcomes<br />Goal 1: Students will demonstrate competency in their understanding of the scientific foundations of clinical psychology by their ability to identify, select and apply the most relevant scientific research to clinical topics. <br />Goal 2: Students will demonstrate competency in their ability to research and evaluate clinical questions by the application of the scientific method, when applicable; by contributing to the existing and evolving body of knowledge and research methods in professional psychology; and by critically evaluating the current body of knowledge in professional psychology that serves as a foundation for practice.<br /> Goal 3: Students will demonstrate fundamental competencies in assessment through effective evaluation and conceptualization of all relevant dimensions of their clients with an emphasis on the use of the most appropriate assessment techniques and understanding of psychopathology, and accurately communicate their findings in a professional manner.<br />Goal 4: Students will demonstrate fundamental competencies in establishing and maintaining effective and ethical collegial and client relationships in professional settings.<br />Goal 5: Students will demonstrate basic intervention competencies by applying appropriate and efficacious therapeutic interventions according to a theoretical and methodological orientation, an assessment of client intervention needs, and by demonstrating the capacity to self observe and self critique the outcomes of their interventions. <br />Goal 6: Students will demonstrate basic competency in practice with clients from diverse backgrounds by appreciating human diversity and integrating that appreciation into the selection, application and interpretation of their psychological assessment techniques and intervention.<br />Goal 7: Students will demonstrate competency in the areas of supervision and consultation by evaluating, selecting, and applying effective consultation and supervision models to practice.<br />Course Objectives<br />Students will understand the basic principles of malingering, deception and their impact on the reliability of assessment data.<br />Students will understand the strengths and weaknesses of using psychometric-based principles to explain effort, malingering and deception.<br />Students will be able to administer, score and interpret a variety of instruments for these purposes. <br />Students to be able to demonstrate this knowledge through multiple methods (applied, through testing and discussion).<br />This course is considered to be an advance course related to the following Program Objectives:<br />Objective 2<br />Will acquire and demonstrate an understanding of and competence in the current theoretical and research foundations of clinical psychology and the relevant body of knowledge of applied psychology.<br />Objective 3<br />Develop a broad perspective of psychological assessment as a generic process, with an emphasis on multimodal approaches, which take in consideration the context of diversity variables.<br />Suggested Readings<br />Most weeks will have additional articles to be read before class and will be available in the library or distributed in class. A complete bibliography is at the end of this syllabus by assessment measure.<br />Assignment Table<br />***I expect students to be familiar with all basic psychological instruments. This would include: <br />WAIS-III<br />WISC-IV<br />MMPI-2<br />MCMI-III<br />PAI<br />Rorschach<br />TAT<br />If you do not feel prepared to discuss these instruments in a fluid manner without the need to constantly refer back to definitions of scales and test construction, please either drop the course and take it when you are more prepared or review materials ahead of time. This course is not designed to re-teach instruments.<br />Topics/ReadingsAssignmentsWeek One Rogers – Chapter 1, 2 & 24 Lally Article (in Library)Hom Article (in Library)Week Two Rogers – Chapter 8 & 9 – Medical & Psychiatric SyndromesRogers – Chapter 4 – PsychosisRogers –Chapter 7 – Post Traumatic Stress DisorderRogers – Chapter 6 – Substance AbuseQuiz OneWeek ThreeRoger – Chapter 10,11 – Multiscale MeasuresRogers – Chapter 12 – Projective Measures Rogers – Chapter 18 – Structured InstrumentsSIMS, SIRS, M-FAST, M-test, Malingering ScaleMeyers & Volbrecht Article (in Library)Larabee Article (in Library)Quinn Article (in Library)Butcher, Arbisi, Atlis, & McNulty (in Library)Quiz TwoWeek Four Rogers – Chapter 13 – AmnesiaRogers – 14 – Intelligence Test and Neuropsychological InstrumentsRogers – Chapter -5CARB, WMT, TOMMData from Paul Green – in classCase ExamplesQuiz ThreeAssignment OneWeek Five Rogers – Chapter 15 – Polygraph ProceduresRogers – Chapter 17 – Sex OffendersMultiphasic Sex Inventory IntroductionPenial PlethysmographyAble ScreensFinal Project AssignmentQuiz ForuAssignment TwoWeek SixRogers – Readings given – Drug Assessed Interviews, HypnosisBrain Fingerprinting lecture/video (if time)Quiz FiveAssignment threeWeek SevenRogers – Chapter 20 – Children and DeceptionCustody EvaluationFaking Good lecturePDS, Marlowe Crowne Social Desirability ScaleCourse Summary & ConclusionsCourse EvaluationsFinal Project Due<br />Course Requirements and Grading<br />There will be an in-class quiz at the beginning of each class period. Quiz length will be 8-12 questions in true/false, multiple choice and fill-in-the-blank format. Each quiz will cover the material from the previous week. The will be no quiz in week one or week 7. Thus, there are a total of 5 quizzes. <br />Quizzes will be used to assess Course Objectives 1-5<br />Take-home assignments will be distributed most weeks, which will be done using the course materials and some additional reading. The format for these assignments will be discussed in class. The majority will consist of case reports using the instruments discussed that day in lecture.<br />Weekly assignments will be used to assess Course Objectives 1-5<br />There will be a final project to cover lecture material using case vignettes and/or raw test data. The data for the project will be distributed at the end of class in week 5.<br />The final project will be used to assess Course Objectives 4 and 5<br />Class participation will be a critical component of the grading and will be measured through lecture and in-class assessment presentations. <br />-Class Participation will be used to assess Course Objectives 1-5<br />Grading Criteria<br />Grading Requirements<br />Project/Assignment% of Grade or Point Value(instructor to decide this)Weekly Quizzes25%Weekly Assignments25%Final Project25%Class Participation25%<br />Grading Scale<br />A100 – 93A-92 – 90B+89 – 88B87 – 83B-82 – 80C+79 – 78C77 - 73C-72 – 70D+69 – 68D67 – 63D-62 – 60F59 and below<br />Library<br />All resources in Argosy University’s online collection are available through the Internet.  The campus librarian will provide students with links, user IDs, and passwords. <br />Library Resources: Argosy University’s core online collection features nearly 21,000 full-text journals and 23,000 electronic books and other content covering all academic subject areas including Business & Economics, Career & General Education, Computers, Engineering & Applied Science, Humanities, Science, Medicine & Allied Health, and Social & Behavior Sciences.  Many titles are directly accessible through the Online Public Access Catalog at http://library.argosy.edu.  Detailed descriptions of online resources are located at http://library.argosy.edu/misc/onlinedblist.html.<br />In addition to online resources, Argosy University’s onsite collections contain a wealth of subject-specific research materials searchable in the Online Public Access Catalog.  Catalog searching is easily limited to individual campus collections.  Alternatively, students can search combined collections of all Argosy University Libraries.  Students are encouraged to seek research and reference assistance from campus librarians.<br />Information Literacy: Argosy University’s Information Literacy Tutorial was developed to teach students fundamental and transferable research skills. The tutorial consists of five modules where students learn to select sources appropriate for academic-level research, search periodical indexes and search engines, and evaluate and cite information. In the tutorial, students study concepts and practice them through interactions. At the conclusion of each module, they can test their comprehension and receive immediate feedback. Each module takes less than 20 minutes to complete. Please view the tutorial at http://library.argosy.edu/infolit/ <br />Academic Policies<br />Academic Dishonesty/Plagiarism: In an effort to foster a spirit of honesty and integrity during the learning process, Argosy University requires that the submission of all course assignments represent the original work produced by that student. All sources must be documented through normal scholarly references/citations and all work must be submitted using the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 5th Edition (2001). Washington DC: American Psychological Association (APA) format. Please refer to Appendix A in the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 5th Edition for thesis and paper format. Students are encouraged to purchase this manual (required in some courses) and become familiar with its content as well as consult the Argosy University catalog for further information regarding academic dishonesty and plagiarism. <br />Scholarly writing: The faculty at Argosy University is dedicated to providing a learning environment that supports scholarly and ethical writing, free from academic dishonesty and plagiarism. This includes the proper and appropriate referencing of all sources. You may be asked to submit your course assignments through “Turnitin,” (www.turnitin.com), an online resource established to help educators develop writing/research skills and detect potential cases of academic dishonesty. Turnitin compares submitted papers to billions of pages of content and provides a comparison report to your instructor. This comparison detects papers that share common information and duplicative language. <br />Americans with Disabilities Act Policy<br />It is the policy of Argosy University to make reasonable accommodations for qualified students with disabilities, in accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). If a student with disabilities needs accommodations, the student must notify the Director of Student Services. Procedures for documenting student disability and the development of reasonable accommodations will be provided to the student upon request. <br />Students will be notified by the Director of Student Services when each request for accommodation is approved or denied in writing via a designated form.  To receive accommodation in class, it is the student’s responsibility to present the form (at his or her discretion) to the instructor.  In an effort to protect student privacy, the Department of Student Services will not discuss the accommodation needs of any student with instructors. Faculty may not make accommodations for individuals who have not been approved in this manner.<br />The Argosy University Statement Regarding Diversity<br />Argosy University prepares students to serve populations with diverse social, ethnic, economic, and educational experiences. Both the academic and training curricula are designed to provide an environment in which students can develop the skills and attitudes essential to working with people from a wide range of backgrounds.<br />Acknowledgement of Syllabus Content<br />I hereby state that I have read, reviewed and understand the syllabus and course requirements for the course “The Clinical Assessment of Malingering and Deception” (PP 8950, CRN 4060), taught by Peter Dodzik, PsyD, ABPdN during the Summer II Semester 2007. This signed statement will be kept on file until the grade appeal time allotment has passed.<br />Name:____________________________________________<br /> <br />Signature:_________________________________________<br />Date:____________________________________________<br />Email:____________________________________________________________<br /> <br /> <br />Thank you in advance for your cooperation. If you need any additional information feel free to contact Dr. Dodzik or your Department Head. <br />Computerized Assessment of Response Bias (CARB) <br />"Age related effects in children taking the Computerized Assessment of Response Bias and Word Memory Test" by John Courtney, Juliet Dinkins, Lyle Allen, & Katherine Kuroski, Katherine. Child Neuropsychology. June, 2003, vol. 9, #2, pages109-116.<br />"Can malingering be identified with the Judgment of Line Orientation Test?" by Grant Iverson. Applied Neuropsychology, September, 2001, pages 167-173.<br />"Comparison of WMT, CARB, and TOMM failure rates in non-head injury disability claimants" by Roger Gervais, Martin Rohling, Paul Green, and Wendy Ford, Wendy. Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, June, 2004, vol. 19, #4, pages 475-487.<br />"Computerized Assessment of Response Bias in forensic neuropsychology" by Lyle Allen, Grant Iverson, & Paul Green. Journal of Forensic Neuropsychology, 2002, 3, pages 205-225. <br />"Detecting neuropsychological malingering: Effects of coaching and information" by Thomas Dunn, Paula Shear, Steven Howe, & Douglas Ris. Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, March, 2003, pages 121-134. <br />"Effects of coaching on symptom validity testing in chronic pain patients presenting for disability assessments" by Roger Gervais, Paul Green, Lyle Allen, & Grant Iverson. Journal of Forensic Neuropsychology, vol. 2, #2, 2001, pages 1-19.<br />"Effects of injury severity and cognitive exaggeration on olfactory deficits in head injury compensation claims" by Paul Green & Grant Iverson. NeuroRehabilitation, vol. 16, #4, 2001, pages 237-243.<br />M Test<br />"Developing sensitivity to distortion: Utility of psychological tests in differentiating malingering and psychopathology in criminal defendants" by Michaela Heinze. Journal of Forensic Psychiatry & Psychology, April, 2003, vol. 14, #1, pages 151-177.<br />"What Tests Are Acceptable for Use in Forensic Evaluations? A Survey of Experts" by Stephen Lally. Professional Psychology: Research & Practice, October, 2003, vol. 34, #5, pages 491-498. <br />Malingering Probability Scale<br />"What Tests Are Acceptable for Use in Forensic Evaluations? A Survey of Experts" by Stephen Lally. Professional Psychology: Research & Practice, October, 2003, vol. 34, #5, pages 491-498. <br />Miller Forensic Assessment of Symptoms Test (M-FAST)<br />"Impact of Coaching on Malingered Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms on the M-FAST and the TSI" by Jennifer Guriel, Tami Yañez, William Fremouw, Andrea Shreve-Neiger, Lisa Ware, Holly Filcheck, & Chastity Farr. Journal of Forensic Psychology Practice, 2004, vol. 4, #2, pages 37-56.<br />"Examining the Use of the M-FAST With Criminal Defendants Incompetent to Stand Trial" by Holly Miller, Holly. International Journal of Offender Therapy & Comparative Criminology, June, 2004, vol. 48, #3, pages 268-280.<br />" Forensic Applications of the Miller Forensic Assessment of Symptoms Test (MFAST): Screening for Feigned Disorders in Competency to Stand Trial Evaluations" by Rebecca Jackson, Richard Rogers, & Kenneth Sewell. Law & Human Behavior, April, 2005, vol. 29, #2, pages 199-210.<br />"Screening for Malingered Psychopathology in a Correctional Setting: Utility of the Miller-Forensic Assessment of Symptoms Test (M-FAST)" by Laura Guy & Holly Miller. Criminal Justice & Behavior, December, 2004, vol. 31, #6, pages 695-716.<br />Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory - Third Edition (MCMI-III)<br />"Ability of the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory - Third Edition To Detect Malingering" by Mike Schoenberg, Darwin Dorr, & Don Morgan. Psychological Assessment, June, 2003, pages 198-204.<br />"What Tests Are Acceptable for Use in Forensic Evaluations? A Survey of Experts" by Stephen Lally. Professional Psychology: Research & Practice, October, 2003, vol. 34, #5, pages 491-498. <br />Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory - Adolescent (MMPI-A) <br />"Identifying faking bad on the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-Adolescent with Mexican adolescents" by Emilia Lucio, Consuelo Duran, John Graham, & Yossef Ben-Porath. Assessment, March, 2002, pages 62-69. <br />Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory - 2 (MMPI-2) <br />"Comparison of the PAI and MMPI-2 as predictors of faking bad" by Dorothy Blanchard, Robert McGrath, D. Pogge, & A. Khadivi. Journal of Personality Assessment, 2003, pages 197-205.<br />"Construct validity of the Lees-Haley Fake Bad Scale:Does this scale measure somatic malingering and feigned emotional distress?" by James N. Butcher, Paul A. Arbisib, Mera M. Atlisa, and John L. McNultyc. Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, July, 2003, pages 473-485. <br />"Detecting Incomplete Effort on the MMPI-2: An Examination of the Fake-Bad Scale in Mild Head Injury" by S.R. Ross, S.R. Millis, R.A. Krukowski, S.H. Putnam, and K.M. Adams. Journal of Clinical & Experimental Neuropsychology, 2004, vol. 26, #1.<br />"Detection of feigned head injury symptoms on the MMPI-2 in head injured patients and community controls" by Chantel Dearth, David Berry, Chad Vickery, Victoria Vagnini, Raymond Baser, Stephen Orey, & Dona Cragar. Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, January, 2005, vol. 20, #1, pages 95-110.<br />"Detection of feigned mental disorders: A meta-analysis of the MMPI-2 & malingering" by Richard Rogers, Kenneth Sewell, Mary Martin, & Michael Vitacco. Assessment, June, 2003, pages 160-177.<br />"Detection of feigned uncoached and coached posttraumatic stress disorder with the MMPI-2 in a sample of workplace accident victims" by Alison Bury & Michael Bagby. Psychological Assessment, December, 2002, pages 472-484. <br />"Detection of Malingering Using Atypical Performance Patterns on Standard Neuropsychological Tests" by Glenn Larrabee. Clinical Neuropsychologist, August, 2003, vol. 17, #3, pages 410-425.<br />"Detection of Symptom Exaggeration with the MMPI-2 in Litigants with Malingered Neurocognitive Dysfunction" by Glenn Larrabee. Clinical Neuropsychologist, February, 2003, vol. 17, #1, pages 54-68.<br />"Developing sensitivity to distortion: Utility of psychological tests in differentiating malingering and psychopathology in criminal defendants" by Michael Heinze. Journal of Forensic Psychiatry & Psychology, April, 2003, vol. 14, #1, pages 151-177.<br />"Development and Validation of the Malingering Discriminant Function Index for the MMPI–2" by Jason R. Bacchiochi and Michael Bagby. Journal of Personality Assessment, 2006, Vol. 87, No. 1, pages 51-61.<br />"Discriminating malingered from genuine civilian posttraumatic stress disorder: A validation of three MMPI-2 infrequency scales (F, Fp, and Fptsd)" by Jon Elhai, James Naifeh, Irene Zucker, Steven Gold, Sarah Deitsch, & Christopher Frueh. Assessment, June, 2004, vol. 11, #2, page 139-144.<br />"Examining the Use of the M-FAST With Criminal Defendants Incompetent to Stand Trial" by Holly Miller. International Journal of Offender Therapy & Comparative Criminology, June, 2004, vol. 48, #3, pages 268-280.<br />"Exaggerated MMPI-2 symptom report in personal injury litigants with malingered neurocognitive deficit" by Glenn Larrabee. Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, August, 2003, vol. 18, #6, pages 673-686.<br />"Examination of the new MMPI-2 Response Bias Scale (Gervais): Relationship with MMPI-2 validity scales" by Nathaniel Nelson, Jerry Sweet, & Robert Heilbronner.Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology, January, 2007, Vol 29(1), pages 67-72.<br />"Fake Bad Scale and MMPI-2 F-Family in Detection of Implausible Psychological Trauma Claims" by Frank Greiffenstein, John Baker, Bradley Axelrod, Edward Peck, and Roger Gervais. Clinical Neuropsychologist, November, 2004, vol. 18, #4, pages 573-590.<br />"Fake Bad Scale in a typical and severe closed head injury litigants" by Frank Greiffenstein, John Baker, Thomas Gola, Jacobus Donders, & Lori Miller. Journal of Clinical Psychology, December, 2002, pages 1591-1600. <br />"Faking PTSD from a motor vehicle accident on the MMPI-2" by Diane Moyer, Barbara Burkhardt, & Robert Gordon. American Journal of Forensic Psychology, 2002, pages 81-89. <br />"Infrequency-Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Scale (Fptsd) for the MMPI-2: Development and Initial Validation With Veterans Presenting With Combat-Related PTSD" by Jon Elhai, Kenneth Ruggiero, Christopher Frueh, Jean Beckham, Paul Gold, & Michelle Feldman. Journal of Personality Assessment, 2002, vol. 79, #3, pages 531-549. <br />"Malingering in forensic neuropsychology: Daubert and the MMPI-2" by Paul Lees-Haley, Grant Iverson, Rael Lange, David Fox, & Lyle Allen. Journal of Forensic Neuropsychology, 2002, 3, pages 167-203. <br />"Meta-Analysis of the MMPI-2 Fake Bad Scale: Utility in Forensic Practice" by Nathaniel Nelson, Jerry Sweet, & GeorgeDemakis. Clinical Neuropsychologist, 2006, vol. 20, #1, pages 39-58.<br />"MMPI-2 fake-bad scales: An attempted cross-validation of proposed cutting scores for outpatients" by David Berry, Cynthia Cimino, Nicole Chong, Susan LaVelle, Ivy Ho, Tamme Morse, Sonja Thacker. Journal of Personality Assessment, April, 2001, pages 296-314.<br />"MMPI-2 Fake Bad Scale: Concordance And Specificity Of True And Estimated Scores" by Nathaniel W. Nelson, Thomas D. Parsons, Christopher L. Grote, Clifford A. Smith, & James R. Sisung. Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology, 2006, vol. 28, #1, pages 1-12.<br />"MMPI-2 F scale elevations in adult victims of child sexual abuse" by Jill Flitter, Jon Elhai, & Steven N. Gold. Journal of Traumatic Stress, June, 2003, vol. 16, #3, pages 269-274.<br />"MMPI-2 scale to detect malingered depression (Md Scale)" by Jarrod Steffan, James Clopton, & Robert Morgan. Assessment, December, 2003, vol. 10, #4, pages 382-392.<br />"MMPI-2 validity scale characteristics in a correctional sample" by John McNulty, Johnathan Forbey, John Graham, Yossef Ben-Porath, Maureen Black, Stephen Anderson, & Kathleen Burlew. Assessment, September, 2003, vol. 10, #3, pages 288-298.<br />"Predictive capacity of the MMPI-2 and PAI validity scales and indexes to detect coached and uncoached feigning" by Michael Bagby, Robert Nicholson, Jason Bacchiochi, Andrew Ryder, & Allison, Bury. Journal of Personality Assessment, February, 2002, pages 69-86. <br />"Psychometric Perspectives on Detection of Malingering of Pain: Use of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality lnventory-2" by Paul Arbisi and James Butcher. Clinical Journal of Pain, November, 2004, vol. 20, #6, pages 383-391.<br />"Screening for feigned psychiatric symptoms in a forensic sample by using the MMPI-2 and the Structured Inventory of Malingered Symptomatology" by Jason Lewis, Andrew Simcox, & David Berry. Psychological Assessment, June, 2002, pages 170-176. <br />"Sensitivity and Specificity of the MMPI-2 Validity Scales and Indicatorsto Malingered Neurocognitive Dysfunction in Traumatic Brain Injury" by Kevin Greve, Jeffrey Bianchini, Adrianne Brennan, and Matthew Heinly. Clinical Neuropsychologist, in press.<br />"Utility of the MMPI-2 infrequency psychopathology F(p) and the revised infrequency psychopathology scales in the detection of malingering" by Thomas Kucharski, Diane Johnsen, & Stephanie Procell. American Journal of Forensic Psychology, 2004, vol 22, #1, pages 33-40.<br />"Validity index for the MMPI-2" by John Meyers, Scott Millis, & Kurt Volkert. Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, February, 2002, pages 157-169. <br />"What Tests Are Acceptable for Use in Forensic Evaluations? A Survey of Experts" by Stephen Lally. Professional Psychology: Research & Practice, October, 2003, vol. 34, #5, pages 491-498. <br />Paulhus Deception Scales (PDS)<br />"Deception in prison assessment of substance abuse" by Henry Richards & Shilpa Pai. Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, March, 2003, vol. 24, #2, pages 121-128.<br />Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI) <br />"Comparison of the PAI and MMPI-2 as predictors of faking bad" by Dorothy Blanchard, Robert McGrath, D. Pogge, & A. Khadivi. Journal of Personality Assessment, 2003, pages 197-205.<br />"Predictive capacity of the MMPI-2 and PAI validity scales and indexes to detect coached and uncoached feigning" by Michael Bagby, Robert Nicholson, Jason Bacchiochi, Andrew Ryder, & Allison, Bury. Journal of Personality Assessment, February, 2002, pages 69-86. <br />"What Tests Are Acceptable for Use in Forensic Evaluations? A Survey of Experts" by Stephen Lally. Professional Psychology: Research & Practice, October, 2003, vol. 34, #5, pages 491-498. <br />Portland Digit Recognition Test (PDRT) <br />"Portland Digit Recognition Test: A review of validation data and clinical use" by Laurence Binder. Journal of Forensic Neuropsychology, 2002, 2, pages 27-41. <br />Rey Malingering Tests <br />"Developing sensitivity to distortion: Utility of psychological tests in differentiating malingering and psychopathology in criminal defendants" by Michaela Heinze. Journal of Forensic Psychiatry & Psychology, April, 2003, vol. 14, #1, pages 151-177.<br />"Effects of incentive and preparation time on performance and classification accuracy of standard and malingering-specific memory tests" by David Shum, John O'Gorman, & Arlene Alpar. Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, September, 2004, vol 19, #6, pages 817-823.<br />"Effects of motivation, coaching, and knowledge of neuropsychology on the simulated malingering of head injury" by Kristi Erdal. Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, January, 2004, vol. 19, #1, pages 73-88.<br />"Evaluation of malingering cut-off scores for the Rey 15-Item Test: A brain injury case study series" by Laura Taylor, Jeffrey Kreutzer, & Deborah West. Brain Injury, April, 2003, pages 295-308.<br />"Malingering on the RAVLT: Part II. Detection strategies" by Karen Sullivan, Cassandra Deffenti, & Beth Keane. Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, April, 2002, pages 223-233. <br />"Review of Rey's strategies for detecting malingered neuropsychological impairment" by Richard Frederick. Journal of Forensic Neuropsychology, 2002, 2, pages 1-25. <br />"Rey AVLT Serial Position Effect: A Useful Indicator of Symptom Exaggeration?" byMatthew Powell, Jeffrey Gfeller, Michael Oliveri, Shannon Stanton, and Bryan Hendricks, Bryan. Clinical Neuropsychologist, July, 2004, vol. 18, #3, pages 465-476.<br />"Using the TOMM for evaluating children's effort to perform optimally on neuropsychological measures" by Marios Constantinou & Robert McCaffrey. Child Neuropsychology, June, 2003, pages 81-90.<br />"What Tests Are Acceptable for Use in Forensic Evaluations? A Survey of Experts" by Stephen Lally. Professional Psychology: Research & Practice, October, 2003, vol. 34, #5, pages 491-498. <br />Rorschach<br />"Can sex offenders who minimize on the MMPI conceal psychopathology on the Rorschach?" by Linda Grossman, Orest Wasyliw, Andrea Benn, & Kevin Gyoerkoe. Journal of Personality Assessment, June, 2002, vol. 78, #3, pages 484-501.<br />"What Tests Are Acceptable for Use in Forensic Evaluations? A Survey of Experts" by Stephen Lally. Professional Psychology: Research & Practice, October, 2003, vol. 34, #5, pages 491-498. <br />Structured Interview of Reported Symptoms (SIRS) <br />"Developing sensitivity to distortion: Utility of psychological tests in differentiating malingering and psychopathology in criminal defendants" by Michaela Heinze. Journal of Forensic Psychiatry & Psychology, April, 2003, vol. 14, #1, pages 151-177.<br />"Examining the Use of the M-FAST With Criminal Defendants Incompetent to Stand Trial" by Holly Miller, Holly. International Journal of Offender Therapy & Comparative Criminology, June, 2004, vol. 48, #3, pages 268-280.<br />"Screening for feigned psychiatric symptoms in a forensic sample by using the MMPI-2 and the Structured Inventory of Malingered Symptomatology" by Jason Lewis, Andrew Simcox, & David Berry. Psychological Assessment, June, 2002, pages 170-176. <br />"What Tests Are Acceptable for Use in Forensic Evaluations? A Survey of Experts" by Stephen Lally. Professional Psychology: Research & Practice, October, 2003, vol. 34, #5, pages 491-498. <br />Structured Inventory of Malingered Symptomatology (SIMS)<br />"Detection of Feigned Psychosis with the Structured Inventory of Malingered Symptomatology (SIMS): A Study of Coached and Uncoached Simulators" by Marko Jelicic, Annemarie Hessels, & Harald Merckelbach. Journal of Psychopathology and Behavioral Assessment March, 2006, vol. 28, #1, pages 19-22.<br />"Diagnostic accuracy of the Structured Inventory of Malingered Symptomatology (SIMS) in detecting instructed malingering" by Harold Merckelbach & Glenn Smith. Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, March, 2003, 18, pages 145-152. <br />"Screening for feigned psychiatric symptoms in a forensic sample by using the MMPI-2 and the Structured Inventory of Malingered Symptomatology" by Jason Lewis, Andrew Simcox, & David Berry. Psychological Assessment, June, 2002, pages 170-176. <br />Test of Memory Malingering (TOMM) <br />"Comparison of three tests to detect feigned amnesia: The effects of feedback and the measurement of response latency" by Barbara Bolan, Jonathan Foster, Ben Schmand, & Steve Bolan. Journal of Clinical & Experimental Neuropsychology, April, 2002, pages 154-167. <br />"Comparison of WMT, CARB, and TOMM failure rates in non-head injury disability claimants" by Roger Gervais, Martin Rohling, Paul Green, and Wendy Ford, Wendy. Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, June, 2004, vol. 19, #4, pages 475-487.<br />"Coverage of the test of memory malingering, victoria symptom validity test, and word memory test on the internet: Is test security threatened?" by Lyndsey Bauer & Robert McCaffrey. Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, January, 2006, vol. 21, #1, pages121-126.<br />"Daubert, Cognitive Malingering, and Test Accuracy" by Douglas Mossman. Law & Human Behavior, June, 2003, pages 229-249.<br />"Depression and the Test of Memory Malingering" by Laura Rees, Tom Tombaugh, & Luc Boulay. Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, July, 2001, pages 501-506.<br />Summary: This study of 26 people who were inpatients diagnosed with major depression found that "the TOMM is unaffected by affective state. These results, combined with those from previous research, provide converging evidence that performance on the TOMM below a cutoff score of 45 cannot be attributable to depression, neurological impairment, age or education." <br />"Detecting simulation of attention deficits using reaction time tests" by Janna Willison & Tom Tombaugh. Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, January, 2006, vol. 21, #1, pages 41-52.<br />"Detecting Symptom- and Test-Coached Simulators with the Test of Memory Malingering' by Matthew Powell, Jeffrey Gfeller, Bryan Hendricks, & Michael Sharland. Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, August, 2004, vol. 19, #5, pages 693-702.<br />"Effect of depression and anxiety on the TOMM in community-dwelling older adults" by Lee Ashendorf, Lee, Marios Constantinou, & Robert McCaffrey. Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, January, 2004, vol. 19, #1, pages 125-130.<br />"Effects of severe depression on TOMM performance among disability-seeking outpatients" by Tami Yanez, Williams Fremouw, Jennifer Tennant, Julia Strunk, & Kayla Coker. Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, February, 2006, vol. 21, #2, pages 161-165.<br />"Hit Rates of Adequate Performance Based on the Test of Memory Malingering (TOMM) Trial 1" by Brandon Gavett, Sid O'Bryant, Jerid Fisher, & Robert McCaffrey. Applied Neuropsychology, 2005, vol. 12, #1, pages 1-4.<br />"How'd they do it? Malingering strategies on symptom validity tests" By Jing Tan, Daniel Slick, Esther Strauss, & David Hultsch. Clinical Neuropsychologist, December, 2002, vol. 16, #4, pages 495-505.<br />"Impact of Cognitive and Psychiatric Impairment of Psychotic Disorders on the Test of Memory Malingering (TOMM)" by Alexander Duncan. Assessment, June, 2005, vol. 12, #2, pages 123-129.<br />"Mediating effects of effort upon the relationship between head injury severity and cognitive functioning" by Alan Moss, Christopher Jones, Dene Fokias, & David Quinn. Brain Injury, May, 2003, vol. 17, #5, pages 377-387.<br />"Neuropsychological performance in Gulf War era veterans: Motivational factors and effort" by Karen Lindem, Roberta White, Timothy Hereen, Susan Proctor, Maxine Krengel, Jennifer Vasterling, Jessica Wolfe, Patricia Sutker, Shalene Kikley, & Terence Keane. Journal of Psychopathology & Behavioral Assessment, June, 2003, vol. 25, #2, pages 129-138.<br />"Performance On The Test Of Memory Malingering In A Mixed Pediatric Sample" by Jacobus Donders. Child Neuropsychology, April, 2005, pages 221-227.<br />"Should the retention trial of the test of memory malingering be optional?" by Kevin Greve and Kevin Bianchini. Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, January, 2006, vol. 21, #1, pages 117-119.<br />"Test of Memory Malingering Performance is unaffected by laboratory-induced pain: Implications for clinical use" by Joseph Etherton, Kevin Bianchini, Kevin Greve, Megan Ciota. Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, May, 2005, vol. 20, #3, pages 375-384.<br />"Test of Memory Malingering (TOMM) in forensic psychology" by Tom Tombaugh. Journal of Forensic Neuropsychology, 2002, 2, pages 69-96. <br />"Test of Memory Malingering (TOMM): Normative data from cognitively intact, cognitively impaired, and elderly patients with dementia" by Gordon Teichner & Mark Wagner. Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, April, 2004, vol. 19, #3, pages 455-464.<br />"Use of the TOMM in a criminal court forensic assessment setting" by Sheryl Delain, Kathleen Stafford, & Yossef Ben-Porath. Assessment, December, 2003, vol. 10, #4, pages 370-381.<br />"Using the TOMM for evaluating children's effort to perform optimally on neuropsychological measures" by Marios Constantinou & Robert McCaffrey. Child Neuropsychology, June, 2003, pages 81-90.<br />"Validation of the Test of Memory Malingering in a Forensic Psychiatric Setting" by Michael Weinborn, Tamara Orr, Steven Woods, Emily Conover, & Jeffrey, Feix. Journal of Clinical & Experimental Neuropsychology, October, 2003, vol. 25, #7, pages 979-990.<br />"What Tests Are Acceptable for Use in Forensic Evaluations? A Survey of Experts" by Stephen Lally. Professional Psychology: Research & Practice, October, 2003, vol. 34, #5, pages 491-498. <br />Traumatic Symptom Inventory (TSI)<br />"Impact of Coaching on Malingered Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms on the M-FAST and the TSI" by Jennifer Guriel, Tami Yañez, William Fremouw, Andrea Shreve-Neiger, Lisa Ware, Holly Filcheck, & Chastity Farr. Journal of Forensic Psychology Practice, 2004, vol. 4, #2, pages 37-56.<br />"Utility of the Trauma Symptom Inventory's Atypical Response Scale in Detecting Malingered Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder" by Jon Elhai, Matthew Gray, James Naifeh, Jimmie Butcher, Joanne Davis, Sherry Falsetti, & Connie Best. Assessment, June 2005, vol. 12, #2, pages 210-219.<br />Validity Indicator Profile<br />"Review of the Validity Indicator Profile" by Richard Frederick. Journal of Forensic Neuropsychology, 2002, 2, pages 125-145. <br />"What Tests Are Acceptable for Use in Forensic Evaluations? A Survey of Experts" by Stephen Lally. Professional Psychology: Research & Practice, October, 2003, vol. 34, #5, pages 491-498. <br />Victoria Symptom Validity Test (VSVT) <br />"Coverage of the test of memory malingering, victoria symptom validity test, and word memory test on the internet: Is test security threatened?" by Lyndsey Bauer & Robert McCaffrey. Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, January, 2006, vol. 21, #1, pages121-126.<br />"How'd they do it? Malingering strategies on symptom validity tests" By Jing Tan, Daniel Slick, Esther Strauss, & David Hultsch. Clinical Neuropsychologist, December, 2002, vol. 16, #4, pages 495-505.<br />"Intraindividual variability as an indicator of malingering in head injury" by Esther, Strauss, Daniel Slick, Judi Levy-Bencheton, Michael Hunter, Stuart MacDonald, & David Hultsch. Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, July, 2002, pages 423-444. <br />"Victoria Symptom Validity Test: An enhanced test of symptom validity" by Garrie Thompson. Journal of Forensic Neuropsychology, 2002, 2, pages 43-67. <br />"What Tests Are Acceptable for Use in Forensic Evaluations? A Survey of Experts" by Stephen Lally. Professional Psychology: Research & Practice, October, 2003, vol. 34, #5, pages 491-498. <br />Word Memory Test <br />"Age related effects in children taking the Computerized Assessment of Response Bias and Word Memory Test" by John Courtney, Juliet Dinkins, Lyle Allen, & Katherine Kuroski, Katherine. Child Neuropsychology. June, 2003, vol. 9, #2, pages109-116.<br />Summary: This study assessed the possible effects of age on childrens' performance on the Word Memory Test (WMT) and the Computerized Assessment of Response Bias (CARB). "Statistical analysis suggests that younger children (those under 10 years of age) tended to produce poorer performance on these instruments."<br />"Can malingering be identified with the Judgment of Line Orientation Test?" by Grant Iverson. Applied Neuropsychology, September, 2001, pages 167-173.<br />"Comparison of WMT, CARB, and TOMM failure rates in non-head injury disability claimants" by Roger Gervais, Martin Rohling, Paul Green, and Wendy Ford. Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, June, 2004, vol. 19, #4, pages 475-487.<br />"Coverage of the test of memory malingering, victoria symptom validity test, and word memory test on the internet: Is test security threatened?" by Lyndsey Bauer & Robert McCaffrey. Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, January, 2006, vol. 21, #1, pages121-126.<br />"Detecting neuropsychological malingering: Effects of coaching and information" by Thomas Dunn, Paula Shear, Steven Howe, & Douglas Ris. Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, March, 2003, pages 121-134. <br />"Effects of coaching on symptom validity testing in chronic pain patients presenting for disability assessments" by Roger Gervais, Paul Green, Lyle Allen, & Grant Iverson. Journal of Forensic Neuropsychology, vol. 2, #2, 2001, pages 1-19.<br />"Effects of injury severity and cognitive exaggeration on olfactory deficits in head injury compensation claims" by Paul Green & Grant Iverson. NeuroRehabilitation, vol. 16, #4, 2001, pages 237-243.<br />"Effort has a greater effect on test scores than severe brain injury in compensation claimants" by Paul Green, Martin Rohling, Paul Lees-Haley,& Lyle Allen. Brain Injury. December, 2001, vol. 15, #12, pages 1045-1060.<br />"Evaluating effort with the Word Memory Test and Category Test--or not: Inconsistencies in a compensation-seeking sample" by David Williamson, Paul Green, Lyle Allen, & Martin Rohling. Journal of Forensic Neuropsychology, 2003, vol. 3, #3, pages 19-44.<br />"How'd they do it? Malingering strategies on symptom validity tests" By Jing Tan, Daniel Slick, Esther Strauss, & David Hultsch. Clinical Neuropsychologist, December, 2002, vol. 16, #4, pages 495-505.<br />"Practice effect of Working Memory Test" by Xueliang Zeng, Damnin Miao, & En Huangfu. Chinese Mental Health Journal, March, 2003, vol. 17, #3, pages 164-166.<br />"Unexamined lie is a lie worth fibbing: Neuropsychological malingering and the Word Memory Test" by David Hartman. Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, October, 2002, pages 709-714.<br />"Word Memory Test and the validity of neuropsychological test scores" by Paul Green, Paul Lees-Haley, & Lyle Allen. Journal of Forensic Neuropsychology, 2002, vol. 2, #3-4, pages 97-124.<br />"Word Memory Test performance in children: by Paul Green & Loyd Flaro. Child Neuropsychology, September, 2003, vol. 9, #3, pages 189-207.<br />