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RtI Overview
RtI Overview
RtI Overview
RtI Overview
RtI Overview
RtI Overview
RtI Overview
RtI Overview
RtI Overview
RtI Overview
RtI Overview
RtI Overview
RtI Overview
RtI Overview
RtI Overview
RtI Overview
RtI Overview
RtI Overview
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RtI Overview

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RtI Overview in North Shore School District 112

RtI Overview in North Shore School District 112

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  • Over the past few years, District 112 has been working on implementing an RtI system in its schools.  Many parts of this system include things we have done for several years:  universal screening of academic skills with CBM and MAP, establishing Problem Solving Teams to address student concerns, and more recently holding whole school data review days, designing intervention blocks, and progress monitoring student growth to make important decisions. The purpose of this presentation is to make sure that all staff have the same basic understanding of RtI as a system and have an opportunity to ask questions about what it may mean for their school.
  • This is an all school / general education initiative. Meaning: The idea of a focus on results means there are pre/post assessments (common formative assessment developed by teachers), progress monitoring (CBM) and performance based measures (MAP, Benchmark Assessments) given to students within the general education setting. This data is used by teachers to help focus on target skills and to adjust the Tier 1 curriculum to help students develop in individual areas, I.e. differentiation and flexible grouping. By focusing on results we will Improve instruction and collaboration, so that all students all experience individual growth and success with the goal that all students meet and/or suceed on state standards (ISATs).
  • Grade level/department initiative: Meaning: Teachers collaborate on data/results to address the needs of individuals or targeted groups that may need additional instruction or different instruction. Different refers to the need of the team or teacher to re-teach, close gaps, and/or additional opportunities to enrich content to meet the needs of the individual student. Collaboration also supports teacher need as well. How we teach students and the results each teacher obtains from a group of students helps inform practice. How can we become better at addressing the needs of our instructional groups? How can we best support each other in developing appropriate leveled student groupings? What can we do differently? What can we share from our own teaching practices? Working smarter, not harder!
  • General Education - Tier 1 Curriculum Meaning: All kids, regardless of level of support, show appropriate individual progress towards learning outcomes / Power Standards. A focus on learning is a data based process. This means all students show individual success on our identified district assessments (Objective 1: Strategic Plan) When students aren’t learning their current supports are adjusted and additional supports maybe identified.
  • Meaning: When grade level teams have appropriately differentiated the core curriculum, made adjustments when a student is not learning and provided interventions (2) that have proven unsuccessful by data, this information maybe used to determine if a student is has a learning disability. The RtI process involves early intensive intervention to children based on their needs. The point of the process towards Tier 3 is to identify and provide guidance for a team of teachers/program to meet the student’s learning needs. The team’s focus on Tier 1 learning, focus on results, and focus on collaboration does not end… The process is extended. An IEP is not conclusion…
  • As part of the stragetic planning process, a group of 112 teachers, administrators and 112 parents met and developed a series of objectives for the District to complete in order to fully implement a RtI plan.  These steps, called Strategy 2, were adopted by the School Board last Spring and became part of the District's long term strategic plan. This year, the plan consists of two parts:  educating staff so we all have a common understanding of RtI basics and developing tools, forms, and others means to support the implementation of an RtI system in each school.
  • One central concept associated with RtI is the concept of a "Tier."  A tier refers to a level of instructional support that is planned and available to students based upon their needs. The most common RtI model has three tiers, or levels of support.  Each increase in a tier is designed to provide more intensive instruction that the tier preceding it, but is also designed to support fewer students. Generally, as a student struggles, they receive more and more instruction in the area of concern in an effort to "jump start" their learning.  Ideally, the tiers build upon each other so that intervention in one tier should better prepare the student to have more success at a lower tier down the road.
  • Tier 1 refers to the high quality core curriculum and instruction that all students receive.   This tier is characterized by using standard blocks of time for the subject matter (e.g., 120 minutes for a reading/literacy block); regular teacher collaboration to review assessments and plan for instruction and differentiation; and the use of a research-based curriculum that has been proven to be effective for most students it is used with.
  • Repeated notes from previous slide: Tier 1 refers to the high quality core curriculum and instruction that all students receive.   This tier is characterized by using standard blocks of time for the subject matter (e.g., 120 minutes for a reading/literacy block); regular teacher collaboration to review assessments and plan for instruction and differentiation; and the use of a research-based curriculum that has been proven to be effective for most students it is used with.
  • Repeated notes from previous slide: Tier 1 refers to the high quality core curriculum and instruction that all students receive.   This tier is characterized by using standard blocks of time for the subject matter (e.g., 120 minutes for a reading/literacy block); regular teacher collaboration to review assessments and plan for instruction and differentiation; and the use of a research-based curriculum that has been proven to be effective for most students it is used with.
  • Repeated notes from previous slide: Tier 1 refers to the high quality core curriculum and instruction that all students receive.   This tier is characterized by using standard blocks of time for the subject matter (e.g., 120 minutes for a reading/literacy block); regular teacher collaboration to review assessments and plan for instruction and differentiation; and the use of a research-based curriculum that has been proven to be effective for most students it is used with.
  • Tier 2 is a fairly new concept to school and it refers to organizing a school's staff in order to provide time efficient interventions to students who lack certain academic skills and do not show enough progress to meet grade expectations by the end of the year. Students in need of a Tier 2 intervention are identified through the use scientifically-validated assessments such as CBM and the MAP test.  Additional data, such as classroom assessment patterns, past ISAT performance and staff judgements are also considered when determining student need. When a student receives Tier 2 interventions their progress is carefully monitored in order to help determine if the supports are working and if the supports can be reduced or should be increased or changed.
  • Repeat from previous slide: Tier 2 is a fairly new concept to school and it refers to organizing a school's staff in order to provide time efficient interventions to students who lack certain academic skills and do not show enough progress to meet grade expectations by the end of the year. Students in need of a Tier 2 intervention are identified through the use scientifically-validated assessments such as CBM and the MAP test.  Additional data, such as classroom assessment patterns, past ISAT performance and staff judgements are also considered when determining student need. When a student receives Tier 2 interventions their progress is carefully monitored in order to help determine if the supports are working and if the supports can be reduced or should be increased or changed.
  • Tier 3 represents the most intensive supports a student can receive at school.  Tier 3 is often an addition to the existing Tier 1 and Tier 2 supports. Teams make decisions about using Tier 3 supports by looking at how discrepant the student's skills are, the degree of progress the student is making, and what their intervention history has been. At this level a team may determine the need for an IEP to protect or continue the level of support being provided to the student. Students receiving Tier 3 supports are carefully monitored and continual collaboration between teachers and support staff is required to make adjustment to meet the needs of the individual student.
  • Transcript

    • 1. RtI: An Overview for Educators District 112 RtI Design Team & Steering Committee
    • 2. What is Response to Intervention?
      • A focus on results:
        • RtI is a framework for enhancing instruction for all students through the use of district, local, and state assessment data to provide instructional support for all students.
    • 3. What is Response to Intervention?
      • A focus on collaboration:
        • Teacher teams collaboratively planning instruction for groups of students based on their needs.
    • 4. What is Response to Intervention?
      • A Focus on learning:
        • Adjusting instruction and providing increasing levels of support to students when they are not learning.
    • 5. What is Response to Intervention?
      • A required procedural element for the identification of students with learning disabilities.
    • 6. RtI is a Central Part of District 112’s Strategic Plan Strategy #2
      • “ We will ensure our educators have the support necessary to utilize effective instructional strategies and interventions to inspire each student to grow to academic excellence.”
        • Plan 1: Educate staff on the purpose, basic components, and essential procedures of Response to Intervention.
        • Plan 2: Establish a system to effectively and consistently implement RtI across all schools.
    • 7. What Does RtI mean?
      • RtI systems are based upon levels of support called “Tiers.” The t i ers build upon one other; each providing a more intensive level of support.
    • 8. What does Tier 1 look like?
      • Tier 1 is . . .
      • High quality General Education CORE instruction.
      • For ALL students.
      • At least 85% of students meet learning targets with just Tier 1 instruction.
    • 9. Tier 1: A Focus on Learning “CORE INSTRUCTION”
      • Research-Based Instruction
      • Frequent Data Collection
      • Well-Managed Classrooms
      • Coordinated Across the Grade/Department Level
      • Instructional Block Times
      • Differentiated and highly engaging instruction
    • 10. Tier 1: A Focus on Results
      • Universal Screenings
        • MAP grades 3-8
        • AIMSWeb grades K-8
      • Local Assessments
        • Frequent common formative assessments to inform instruction.
        • Benchmark Assessments
      How do we know students are learning?
    • 11. Tier 1: A focus on collaboration
      • Grade Level Groupings
        • Student groups by skill level across grade level.
        • Assessment-based.
        • Student group with highest needs is usually the smallest.
      • Differentiation
        • Small groups in class.
        • Strategic homework assignments/extra practice.
        • Preteaching and reteaching.
        • Simple, go-to interventions.
    • 12. Tier 1: A Focus on Collaboration
      • Critical questions before moving to Tier 2:
      • Has this student’s core curriculum been implemented with fidelity ?
      • Does the data indicate that this student is discrepant from his/her peers (universal screening and classroom assessments)?
      • What differentiation and interventions have occurred at Tier One that have been unsuccessful?
    • 13. Tier 2: How do we respond when students do not learn?
      • Tier 2 is additional , supplemental interventions for students who need more support than is available through Tier 1 with adjustments.
      • The CORE plus MORE!
      • About 10% of students may need Tier 1 and 2 to be successful.
      Occurs in addition to Core. Lasts 8-12 weeks per cycle. Small groups. Systematic instructional programs. Frequent progress monitoring.
    • 14. Tier 2: Structures to Support Learning
      • Planned small groups/systems level support through:
      • Intervention Blocks in Elementary Schools
      • Extension Blocks/Academic Enrichment in Middle Schools.
    • 15. Tier 1 and Tier 2: A Focus on Collaboration
      • Questions before moving to Tier 3:
      • Has this student’s core curriculum and Tier 2 interventions been implemented with fidelity ?
      • Does the data indicate that this student is significantly discrepant from his/her peers?
      • Does the student continue to learn more slowly than expected despite Tier 2 interventions that have been closely monitored and adjusted ?
    • 16. Tier 3: How do we respond when students do not learn?
      • Tier 3 includes intensive interventions. The teaching team implements intensive small-group or one-to-one interventions to meet the needs of students who need more support than they are receiving through Tier 1 and Tier 2 together.
    • 17. Summing up, RtI includes:
      • High quality, research-based instructional and behavior supports in General Education.
      • Teacher team collaboration to provide flexible, differentiated instruction to all students.
      • School-wide screening to determine which students need closer monitoring or additional interventions.
      • Multiple tiers of increasingly intense, research-based interventions matched to the needs of student(s).
      • Use of collaborative problem solving to develop, implement, and monitor interventions.
    • 18. Summing up, RtI includes:
      • Continuous monitoring of student progress to determine if instruction/interventions are effective in meeting the needs of student(s).
      • Follow-up to ensure that the instruction/interventions were implemented as planned.
      • Active parent involvement throughout the process of pursuing solutions that lead to increased success.
      • The RtI process can be used to help determine if a child has a disability while supporting his/her academic and behavior progress.

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