Color Mixing
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Color Mixing

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Color Mixing Color Mixing Presentation Transcript

  • Ryann Z. Elumba ITMM 211: Digital Imaging and Desktop Publishing Computer Science Department College of Science and Information Technology Ateneo de Zamboanga University Color Mixing
  • Additive Color Mixing
    • An additive color system involves light emitted directly from a source or illuminant of some sort. The additive reproduction process usually uses red , green and blue light to produce the other colors.
    • Combining one of these additive primary colors with another in equal amounts produces the additive secondary colors cyan, magenta, and yellow. Combining all three primary lights (colors) in equal intensities produces white.
    Additive color mixing: adding red to green yields yellow; adding yellow to blue yields white Computer monitors and televisions are the most common application of additive color.
  • Subtractive Color Mixing
    • Subtractive color explains the theory of mixing paints, dyes, inks, and natural colorants to create colors which absorb some wavelengths of light and reflect others.
    Subtractive color mixing
  • Ryann Z. Elumba ITMM 211: Digital Imaging and Desktop Publishing Computer Science Department College of Science and Information Technology Ateneo de Zamboanga University Color Harmony
  • Color Harmony or Color Scheme
    • The principle of harmony refers to the visual agreement of all parts of a work. The successful application of harmony results in unity.
  • Monochromatic
    • The monochromatic color scheme uses variations in lightness and saturation of a single color.
    • Pros:
      • Looks clean and elegant
      • Produces a soothing effect.
      • Can be used to establish an overall mood.
    • Cons:
      • This scheme lacks color contrast.
      • It is not as vibrant as the complementary scheme.
    • Tips:
      • Use tints, shades, and tones of the key color to enhance the scheme.
    Different levels of brown is used in this composition. Source: www.deviantart.com
  • Analogous
    • The analogous color scheme uses colors that are adjacent to each other on the color wheel. One color is used as a dominant color while others are used to enrich the scheme.
    • Pros:
      • as easy to create as the monochromatic, but looks richer.
    • Cons:
      • Lacks color contrast. It is not as vibrant as the complementary scheme.
    • Tips:
      • Avoid using too many hues in the analogous scheme, because this may ruin the harmony.
      • Avoid combining warm and cool colors in this scheme.
    This composition makes use of the adjacent colors of the color wheel, from red to blue. Source: www.deviantart.com
  • Complementary
    • The complementary color scheme is made of two colors that are opposite each other on the color wheel.
    • Pros:
      • offers stronger contrast than any other color scheme, and draws maximum attention.
    • Cons:
      • This scheme is harder to balance than monochromatic and analogous schemes, especially when desaturated warm colors are used.
    • Tips:
      • For best results, place cool colors against warm ones, for example, blue versus orange.
      • If you use a warm color (red or yellow) as an accent, you can desaturate the opposite cool colors to put more emphasis on the warm colors.
      • Avoid using desaturated warm colors (e.g. browns or dull yellows)
    This composition makes two opposite colors in the color wheel; red and green. Source: www.deviantart.com
  • Other Color Schemes Split-Complementary Relationship One hue plus two others equally spaced from its complement. Double-Complementary Relationship Two complementary color sets; the distance between selected complementary pairs will effect the overall contrast of the final composition. Triad Relationship Three hues equally positioned on a color wheel.