A comparison of jeffersonian and jacksonian concepts about democracy

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A comparison of jeffersonian and jacksonian concepts about democracy

  1. 1. A Comparison of Jeffersonian and Jacksonian concepts about Democracy ______Jeffersonian Democracy__________________ Jacksonian Democracy_________ Feared a strong central government Desired a strong central government Strengthened the Congress – the Legislative branch for the sake of the People – the people who could vote and owned land Strengthened the Executive branch for the common people – voting laws had changed by 1828 and property was not a requirement for voting. Jefferson believed that an educated group of elite citizens could run the country. Jackson believed in the universal enfranchisement of all eligible white males Jefferson believed that well-intentioned planter class of farmers such as the planter class should be the leaders of the nation. Jackson believed this period increase of respect and power for the common men. Broadly speaking, Jacksonian democracy, in contrast to the Jeffersonian era, promoted the strength of the executive branch and the Presidency at the expense of Congressional power, while also seeking to broaden the public's participation in government. Jacksonians believed in enfranchising all eligible white males, rather than just the propertied class, and supported the patronage system that enabled politicians to appoint their supporters into administrative offices (To the Victor Go the Spoils), arguing that it would lead to increased public participation in politics. They opposed appointive judges. They rewrote many state constitutions to reflect the new values. In national terms the Jacksonians favored geographical expansion; sometimes justifying it in terms of Manifest Destiny. There was usually a consensus among both Jacksonians and Whigs that political battles over slavery should be avoided. The Jacksonian Era lasted roughly from Jackson's election until the slavery issue became dominant after 1850 and the American Civil War dramatically reshaped American politics.

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