Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
  • Like
Parody Stylistics
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Now you can save presentations on your phone or tablet

Available for both IPhone and Android

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

Parody Stylistics

  • 892 views
Published

Here is a .ppt file of my report about parody stylistics

Here is a .ppt file of my report about parody stylistics

Published in Education
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
892
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
20
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Parody and Satire
    • draw on particular kind of irony for the design of their stylistic incongruity
  • 2. Irony
    • Situated between what you say and what you mean
    • Example:
    • You’re a fine friend! (When said to someone who just let you down)
  • 3. Irony
    • echo other utterances and forms of discourse
    • Example:
    • Sid: I’m really fed up with this washing up. (Straight)
    • Karen: You’re fed up! Who do you think is been doing it all week? (Ironic)
  • 4.
    • * Ironic echo is central to the concept of PARODY.
    • Parody
    • - can take any particular anterior (frontal) text as its model, although more general characteristics of other genre of discourse
  • 5.
    • Satire
    • - has an aggressive element
    • - requires further kind of ironic twist or distortion in its textual make-up
    • - if parodies can remain affectionate to their source, satire can never be so
    • - created through an opposition or distortion within its own stylistic fabric
  • 6.
    • Example:
    • Jonathan Swift’s A Modest Proposal-
    • - where the person proposes to lessen the burden of overpopulation by eating the country’s children