Food Policy Councils:An Online ConversationMarch 16, 2012
Agenda for Today’s Webinar• Welcome and technology overview• Who is the Central Appalachian Network?• Presentations • The ...
Technology Overview         • Attendee lists – how to hide or           expand         • Meeting chat – ask questions     ...
The Central Appalachian Network• Network led by six non-profit organizations  •   ACEnet – Athens, OH  •   ASD – Abingdon,...
The Central Appalachian Network• Focused on building and strengthening local and  regional agricultural value chains• Trai...
A Pioneer in Food Systems Policy Work                            Stephanie Welch     Chair, Knoxville-Knox County Food Pol...
Knoxville-Knox CountyFood Policy Council Established 1982 by Knoxville Resolution (R-202-81). Expanded to include Knox C...
How It Started 1977 report by University of Tennessee  Graduate School of Planning    Under the direction of Robert Wils...
How It Started Assessment report caught the attention  of Knoxville-Knox County Community  Action Committee (CAC) CAC re...
Early Activities Assessments:    Interviews and public forum events    Environmental assessments and interviews in inne...
Early Activities Successful advocacy efforts:    Bus route changes related to grocery locations    New “grocery bus”   ...
Knoxville-Knox County Food PolicyCouncil Members    City of Knoxville Appointees:        Knox County Appointees: Chad Hel...
Recent Activities Partnered with UT to  complete a food equity  assessment Convened a series of forums  on community gar...
March 10L&N Stem Academy                                      Helping people become                                      ...
Ingredients for Success Leadership:                       Focus:    Facilitation                      Realistic expect...
Knoxville Knox County Food Policy Councilhttp://www.cityofknoxville.org/boards/food.aspStephanie Welch, Chair, Knoxville-K...
Asheville-Buncombe Food Policy Council     Addressing   Poverty, Public    Health, Local   Commerce andSustainability thro...
Food Security    The world health  organization definesfood security as existing “when all people at all  times have acces...
Regional Food       Security• 14 of Buncombe County’s 15 ZIP codescontain a food outlet of some sort yet 1out of 6 people ...
Problems associated with Food Insecurity•Impaired mental and physicaldevelopment in young children•Food insecure children ...
Causes of Food          Insecurity•“Food Deserts”-areas that do not have aconvenient, affordable, healthy foodsource nearb...
Opportunities to a   Food Secure   CommunityWe have enormousopportunities regarding ourcommunity’s commitment toensuring a...
Improving Food       security•Local food is asimple, convenient, andpowerful tool to achieve foodsecurity•Local food is re...
Buncombe County &        Asheville•In 2007 there were 72,087 acresused as farmland•There are currently 15 majortailgate ma...
Improving foodsecurity infrastructure•If the food and farm economywere expanded in WNC anadditional $200 to $300 millionwo...
Local Food Policy          Council•Food insecurity is complex and cannotbe solved by one organization or oneinitiative•In ...
Food Policy Council         Makeup•Diverse makeup, farmers, communityleaders, food banks, faith based, healthdirectors, ho...
Goals of the council•Improve food sustainabilitywithin the region•Coordinate production anddistribution to increaseefficie...
Food Working GroupBrandee Boggs- Director- UNCAStudent Environmental CenterDarcel Eddins- ExecutiveDirector, Bountiful Cit...
Starting Asheville’sFood Policy CouncilThe Asheville-Buncombe FoodPolicy Council began as acollaboration between a local u...
Structure: ClustersModelThe Asheville Buncombe FoodPolicy Council agreed to moveahead with a Spokes and Hubmodel of organi...
Decision-Making:Dynamic GovernanceThe Asheville-Buncombe FoodPolicy Council has agreed to use themodel of Dynamic Governan...
Contact Asheville-Buncombe Food Policy      Council:www.abfoodpolicy.comAsheville-Buncombe FoodPolicy Council on Facebookw...
Athens FoodPolicy Council   Athens County, Ohio
Why A Food Policy                Council?Community Member Driven: sparked from Athens City Town Hall meetingPublic support...
AFPC Membership   Farmers and Producers   Athens City-County Health    Department   Rural Action   ACENet   Community...
AFPC Goals Mission Statement   “The mission of the AFPC is to grow     healthy, equitable, and sustainable food systems ...
Structure Monthly Meetings Open to the public Agency-sponsored   facilitator Subcommittees Open forum for         Chi...
Policy ChangesMay be a law, ordinance, resolution, mandate, regulation, or rule (both formaland informal) that guide or i...
Environmental ChangesInvolves physical or material changes to theeconomic, social or physical environment.    Eight Loca...
System ChangesImpact all elements of an organization, institution, or system.Can include a policy or an environmental ch...
Education and Advocacy                                                                 30 Mile Meal                      ...
Educating Ourselves Panel Discussion on Food Policy with City, County and   State Politicians USDA & Farm Bill Policy-Mi...
Challenges Keeping farmers engaged Addressing diverse interests within membership Sustainability: there is a need to de...
Athens Food Policy Council  Contact Information       Bob Fedyski           Rural Action Sustainable Agriculture       ...
Food Policy Councils Webinar Combined
Food Policy Councils Webinar Combined
Food Policy Councils Webinar Combined
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Food Policy Councils Webinar Combined

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  • This data came from a State of TN economic report.
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  • Food Policy Councils Webinar Combined

    1. 1. Food Policy Councils:An Online ConversationMarch 16, 2012
    2. 2. Agenda for Today’s Webinar• Welcome and technology overview• Who is the Central Appalachian Network?• Presentations • The Knoxville/Knox County Food Policy Council (Tennessee) • The Asheville-Buncombe Food Policy Council (North Carolina) • The Athens Food Policy Council (Ohio)• Questions and discussion
    3. 3. Technology Overview • Attendee lists – how to hide or expand • Meeting chat – ask questions or make comments • Address to host (Katy Allen) or to everyone • Webinar is being recorded • Follow-up email: link to recording and short evaluation survey
    4. 4. The Central Appalachian Network• Network led by six non-profit organizations • ACEnet – Athens, OH • ASD – Abingdon, VA • CEO – Charleston, WV • MACED – Berea, KY • NCIF – Shepherdstown, WV • Rural Action – Trimble, OH• Shared purpose is to work for a more just and sustainable Appalachia
    5. 5. The Central Appalachian Network• Focused on building and strengthening local and regional agricultural value chains• Training, technical assistance, network- building, regional gatherings, online learning opportunities, policy outreach and education, small grants program• For more information, visit www.cannetwork.org
    6. 6. A Pioneer in Food Systems Policy Work Stephanie Welch Chair, Knoxville-Knox County Food Policy Council and Director of Community Development and Planning, Knox County Health Department
    7. 7. Knoxville-Knox CountyFood Policy Council Established 1982 by Knoxville Resolution (R-202-81). Expanded to include Knox County in 2002 (R-02-6- 903). Purpose: Monitor Knoxville’s food supply system and recommend appropriate actions to improve the system. 11 Members:  5 City Appointees  6 County Appointees
    8. 8. How It Started 1977 report by University of Tennessee Graduate School of Planning  Under the direction of Robert Wilson Recommendations:  Establish a Food Policy Council  Create plans or policies to preserve ag. land  Support activities to increase urban gardening  Improve wholesale produce facilities  Study long-term need for produce facility, food distribution center, food production center, farmers’ market  Prepare for solid-waste disposal need of 1982 World Fair  Monitor food retail operations, particularly effect on disadvantaged groups  And More….
    9. 9. How It Started Assessment report caught the attention of Knoxville-Knox County Community Action Committee (CAC) CAC received funding from USDA to support a “Food Supply Project” Reps from Food Supply Project approached Knoxville Mayor to request:  Staff support from Community and Economic Development and from planning commission  Assistance with approaching local food industry reps, transportation officials  Ongoing support from his office City Council adopted resolution to establish the Knoxville Food Policy Council
    10. 10. Early Activities Assessments:  Interviews and public forum events  Environmental assessments and interviews in inner-city food stores  Price comparisons between inner-city and outlying stores Recommendations:  Planning to include food distribution  Developers to provide food facilities for Worlds Fair residential development
    11. 11. Early Activities Successful advocacy efforts:  Bus route changes related to grocery locations  New “grocery bus”  Grocery stores began carrying folding carts for persons who shopped by bus  Growth of school breakfast to include 5,300 more children  Established a school nutrition education position Annual Report to City Council
    12. 12. Knoxville-Knox County Food PolicyCouncil Members City of Knoxville Appointees: Knox County Appointees: Chad Hellwinckel, UT  Barbara Monty, CAC Office on Agricultural Economics Aging James Bosi, Sysco  Emily Gonzalez, UT Extension Gail Root, Second Harvest  Robert Hodge, El Puente (Vice- Charlotte Tolley, Market Chair) Square Farmers Market  Amy Broyles, Knox County Mark Campen, Knoxville City Commission Council  Jon Dickl, Knox County Schools  Stephanie Welch, Knox County Health Department (Chair)
    13. 13. Recent Activities Partnered with UT to complete a food equity assessment Convened a series of forums on community gardens Produced a community garden toolkit Compiled a report outlining the connections between local food systems and our economy
    14. 14. March 10L&N Stem Academy  Helping people become involved in local food and active outdoor spaces in support of their own healthy living. Special event for policy makers: March 9, 8:30 – 10:30, East TN  Also check out FRESH (the History Center movie), March 9, 7:30 p.m. at Hear from an expert about Relix Variety Theatre how the food system impacts (across from Time Warp Tea our local economy Room!)
    15. 15. Ingredients for Success Leadership:  Focus:  Facilitation  Realistic expectations  Passion  Tied to guiding principals  Communication skills  Based on: data, opportunity,  Time/energy passion and expertise of  Cultivate future leadership members Structure:  Relationships  Within team  Bylaws, guiding principals  With stakeholders  Organizational support (minutes, meeting  Resources reminders, etc.)  Dedicated staff and funding  Membership rotation is useful
    16. 16. Knoxville Knox County Food Policy Councilhttp://www.cityofknoxville.org/boards/food.aspStephanie Welch, Chair, Knoxville-Knox County Food PolicyCouncilDirector, Community Development and PlanningKnox County Health DepartmentStephanie.welch@knoxcounty.org; 215-5297
    17. 17. Asheville-Buncombe Food Policy Council Addressing Poverty, Public Health, Local Commerce andSustainability through Food Security
    18. 18. Food Security The world health organization definesfood security as existing “when all people at all times have access tosufficient, safe nutritious food to maintain a healthy and active life”
    19. 19. Regional Food Security• 14 of Buncombe County’s 15 ZIP codescontain a food outlet of some sort yet 1out of 6 people in WNC experience foodinsecurity• 27% increase in county residentsreceiving food assistance in 2010• 50% of students within BuncombeCounty School system were enrolled inthe free and reduced lunch programduring 2009-2010 year, up from 47% theprevious year•Asheville has now been ranked third inthe nation for food hardship, up from 7thin 2010
    20. 20. Problems associated with Food Insecurity•Impaired mental and physicaldevelopment in young children•Food insecure children are 90%more likely to be in fair or poorhealth than food secure children•A poorly prepared anduncompetitive work force•Family and personalinstability, where uncertainness over“the next meal” creates a roadblockto dealing with other problems
    21. 21. Causes of Food Insecurity•“Food Deserts”-areas that do not have aconvenient, affordable, healthy foodsource nearby, or full scale grocery store•High prices for healthy food even whenit is available•Inadequate cooking education andnutrition information•Limited public awareness on thenecessity and accessibility ofaffordable, healthy food•The availability of Local sustainable foodto the population
    22. 22. Opportunities to a Food Secure CommunityWe have enormousopportunities regarding ourcommunity’s commitment toensuring astable, healthy, andaffordable food supply. Foodsecurity encompasses issuesof poverty, publichealth, local commerce, andsustainability.
    23. 23. Improving Food security•Local food is asimple, convenient, andpowerful tool to achieve foodsecurity•Local food is reliably healthyand beneficial to theeconomy• Local food increases accessand affordability of fruits andvegetables
    24. 24. Buncombe County & Asheville•In 2007 there were 72,087 acresused as farmland•There are currently 15 majortailgate markets in Asheville andgrowing•There are approximately 11community gardens in Ashevilleand growing•There are many communitygardens in Buncombe County andgrowing
    25. 25. Improving foodsecurity infrastructure•If the food and farm economywere expanded in WNC anadditional $200 to $300 millionwould be spent on locally sourcedfood within the region•Expanding could increaseemployment opportunities•Local food expansion couldaddress poverty, publichealth, commerce, andsustainability within anycommunity or region
    26. 26. Local Food Policy Council•Food insecurity is complex and cannotbe solved by one organization or oneinitiative•In WNC several organizations areconcerned with hunger and foodsecurity•Buncombe County and Asheville havea good foundation with strong localfood awareness and communitysupport•The opportunity to work acrosssectors, government, business, non-profits, educational institutions andother organizations
    27. 27. Food Policy Council Makeup•Diverse makeup, farmers, communityleaders, food banks, faith based, healthdirectors, hospitals, communitycenters, local restaurants, educators, andcommunity members• Local food production, distribution, andeducation•These stakeholders are people with theideas, resources, and ability to make adifference and who, given theopportunity, will make a difference
    28. 28. Goals of the council•Improve food sustainabilitywithin the region•Coordinate production anddistribution to increaseefficiency•Expand food education•Improve land usage•Increase access of healthierfood options
    29. 29. Food Working GroupBrandee Boggs- Director- UNCAStudent Environmental CenterDarcel Eddins- ExecutiveDirector, Bountiful CitiesOlufemi Lewis- Public HousingResident and Community GardenerAustin Fero- UNCA InternFred Porter- Asheville High SchoolInternJodi Rhoden- Local BusinessOwner, Board Member, BountifulCitiesGordon Smith- Asheville City Councilwncfoodpolicy@gmail.com
    30. 30. Starting Asheville’sFood Policy CouncilThe Asheville-Buncombe FoodPolicy Council began as acollaboration between a local urbanagriculture organization (BountifulCities), the University of NorthCarolina Asheville, communitymembers, and City CouncilmanGordon Smith. This working groupmet with representatives of over 50government, private sector, andcommunity organizations tointroduce the idea of a food policycouncil. The first convening in Fallof 2011 saw over 80 communitymembers in attendance.
    31. 31. Structure: ClustersModelThe Asheville Buncombe FoodPolicy Council agreed to moveahead with a Spokes and Hubmodel of organization. Thespokes, or Clusters, meet toaddress specific aspects of foodsecurity and then sendrepresentatives to be a part of theformal Food Policy Council. We arenow working with the following 7Clusters - Communications; AssetMapping; Legislation, Policy, andAdvocacy; Land Use Policy; PublicHealth, Wellness, and Education;Access; and Local Food Flow.
    32. 32. Decision-Making:Dynamic GovernanceThe Asheville-Buncombe FoodPolicy Council has agreed to use themodel of Dynamic Governance fordecision making. Attendees agreedthat the decision-making processseems to be fair, democratic andefficient. The process allows eachvoter to ask questions, shareresponses and have a voice.Dynamic Governance is a decision-making structure that combines themost effective qualities oftraditional decision-making (likeRobert’s Rules of Order) with newermodels such as Consensus.
    33. 33. Contact Asheville-Buncombe Food Policy Council:www.abfoodpolicy.comAsheville-Buncombe FoodPolicy Council on Facebookwncfoodpolicy@gmail.com
    34. 34. Athens FoodPolicy Council Athens County, Ohio
    35. 35. Why A Food Policy Council?Community Member Driven: sparked from Athens City Town Hall meetingPublic support for the local food economyPublic interest in developing front yard garden policy for Athens CityPublic concerns about food access gapsProvided needed structure for collaboration between organizations
    36. 36. AFPC Membership Farmers and Producers Athens City-County Health Department Rural Action ACENet Community Food Initiatives Locavore Business Owners Ohio University faculty and staff Live Healthy Appalachia Athens City Chamber of Commerce: 30 Mile Meal Extension Office staff Local government officials And many more!
    37. 37. AFPC Goals Mission Statement  “The mission of the AFPC is to grow healthy, equitable, and sustainable food systems in our region.” Focus Areas  Education  Local Foods Marketing  Access and Equity  Economic and Food Community Assessment  Advocacy  Policy
    38. 38. Structure Monthly Meetings Open to the public Agency-sponsored facilitator Subcommittees Open forum for Children enjoying local apples agenda items
    39. 39. Policy ChangesMay be a law, ordinance, resolution, mandate, regulation, or rule (both formaland informal) that guide or influence behavior. Big “P” or little “p.”  Front Yard Gardening Policy  Ohio University commitment to local foods Chesterhill Produce Auction: (from Left) Leslie Schaller of ACENet, Debbie Philips of Ohio Congress, Matt Rapposeli of Ohio University
    40. 40. Environmental ChangesInvolves physical or material changes to theeconomic, social or physical environment. Eight Local Community Gardens Fruit and Nut Tree Planting and Mapping Youth Entrepreneurs vending at Athens Farmers Market
    41. 41. System ChangesImpact all elements of an organization, institution, or system.Can include a policy or an environmental change strategy.  Food is Elementary  Country Fresh Stops  Nelsonville and Trimble Farmers Market  Local Food is Schools (from public schools to the university)  Worksite CSA DeliveryCountry Fresh Stops at Cee-Dee Handi-Mart in Chauncey, Ohio
    42. 42. Education and Advocacy  30 Mile Meal  Live Healthy Appalachia Summit  Cook’s Conferences  Community Education and Outreach Southeastern Ohio Cook’s Conference, 2011  University students and professors providing research and grant writingBob Fedyski teaching knife skills workshop for AmeriCorps Members
    43. 43. Educating Ourselves Panel Discussion on Food Policy with City, County and State Politicians USDA & Farm Bill Policy-Mike Strode Natural Gas Industrial Activity and Impact on Agriculture- Sonia Marcus, Natalie Kruse, and others
    44. 44. Challenges Keeping farmers engaged Addressing diverse interests within membership Sustainability: there is a need to develop a representative board to meet quarterly. Need for Food Systems Infrastructure Funding Ongoing need for community education Need to directly connect AFPC with State-level sustainable agriculture umbrella organizations (OEEFFA, IFOH, Farm Bureau, etc)
    45. 45. Athens Food Policy Council  Contact Information  Bob Fedyski  Rural Action Sustainable Agriculture  740-767-4938 bob@ruralaction.org  Ruth Dudding  Athens City-County Health Department  740-592-4431 ext 225 dudding@health.athens.oh.us  Mary Nally  Athens City-County Health Department/AmeriCorps  740-592-4431 ext 226 marycomcorps@gmail.com

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