Fundamentals of Intellectual Property Rights (IPRs):Perspectives for an Academic SettingCaezar Angelito Estioko ArceoProud...
Ideas…     Ideas…          Ideas…                               © 2005 by CAE Arceo                                    Fir...
Our basic questions1. What is an IPR?2. Why is there a need for IPRs?3. What can be protected as an IPR?4. How can IPRs be...
Question No. 1What is an IPR?
1. What is an IPR? 1.1 It is a right.       Property rights which result from the        physical manifestation of origin...
Question No. 2Why is there a need for IPRs?
2. Why is there a need for IPRs? 2.1 Because you have something new and useful.                              INVENTOR     ...
2. Why is there a need for IPRs? 2.1 Because you have something new and useful.
2. Why is there a need for IPRs?                                 © 2007 by CAE Arceo                                      ...
2. Why is there a need for IPRs?                                                                   © 2007 by CAE Arceo    ...
2. Why is there a need for IPRs? 2.2 Because no one wants frustration.
2. Why is there a need for IPRs? 2.2 Because no one wants frustration.                    “Armalite”                      ...
2. Why is there a need for IPRs? 2.2 Because no one wants frustration.                                         Some in the...
2. Why is there a need for IPRs? 2.2 Because no one wants frustration.    IRRI-PhilRice’s Leaf        color chart         ...
2. Why is there a need for IPRs? 2.3 Because the law says so.                                “The State shall protect and ...
2. Why is there a need for IPRs?                               “(T)o give priority to                                     ...
2. Why is there a need for IPRs? 2.3 Because the law says so. Some International Treaties that cover IPRs  Patent Coopera...
2. Why is there a need for IPRs? 2.3 Because the law says so.                                                             ...
2. Why is there a need for IPRs? 2.4 Because you want an edge. “Zombie cockroach”
Question No. 3What can be protected as an IPR?
3. What can be protected as an IPR?    The easiest IPR to protect.                                       Obtained at the...
3. What can be protected as an IPR?                                                                 EXCLUSIONS:3.2 Patents...
3. What can be protected as an IPR?3.2 Patents.                 Novelty            1                                      ...
3. What can be protected as an IPR?3.3 Utility Models.                 Novelty            1                               ...
3. What can be protected as an IPR?3.4 Industrial Designs Protects the aesthetic design of the product.
3. What can be protected as an IPR?Patents vs. Utility Models vs. Industrial Designs:Original designVersion 1             ...
3. What can be protected as an IPR?3.5 Trademarks. Protects brands. Comprises words, marks, symbols, or any of their com...
3. What can be protected as an IPR?                                          Trade secrets3.6 Other IPRs.  Plant Varieties...
Question No. 4How can IPRs be protected?
4. How can IPRs be protected?4.1 Strategize.                         Who are potential                                    ...
4. How can IPRs be protected?4.2 Always keep in mind: The “First-to-File” Rule.                                       Firs...
4. How can IPRs be protected?4.3 Institutionalize an “IP Policy”.      Inspiration: Definition of “Technology Transfer”   ...
4. How can IPRs be protected?4.3 Institutionalize an “IP Policy”.Default terms of IPR ownership (RA 8293)Type of IPR      ...
4. How can IPRs be protected?4.3 Institutionalize an “IP Policy”.Usual contents of an IP Policy:   University IPR ownersh...
4. How can IPRs be protected?4.3 Institutionalize an “IP Policy”.Sample invention disclosure process flow (Singapore model...
4. How can IPRs be protected?4.4 Sustain the gains.
Question No. 5What is in store for VMUF?
5. What are in store for VMUF? 5.1 IPRs as leverage.
5. What are in store for VMUF?                                              © 2007 by CAE Arceo                           ...
5. What are in store for VMUF? 5.2 Some university models.
5. What are in store for VMUF? 5.2 Some university models.
5. What are in store for VMUF? 5.2 Some university models.
5. What are in store for VMUF? 5.3 Exploration of a network. http://www.ipophil.gov.ph
5. What are in store for VMUF? 5.4 Streamlining R&D and commercialization efforts.                             Faculty and...
An invitation from the oldest research council in Asia…                                         University researchers to ...
Question No. 6Do you have any question?…and thank you!                                                                    ...
Creditshttp://wipo.int/amc/en/domains/Photo                     SourceArmalite                  http://www.policemag.com/C...
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Fundamentals of Intellectual Property Rights (IPRs): Perspectives for an Academic Setting

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Lecture during the 9th Martin M. Posadas Memorial Research Forum held at the Virgen Milagrosa University Foundation, San Carlos City, Pangasinan, Philippines, on 23 February 2012. The audience was composed of professors, university researchers, and students. Some university models were also presented.

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  • Fundamentals of Intellectual Property Rights:Perspectives for an Academic SettingCopyright 2012 by CaezarAngelitoEstiokoArceo
  • Fundamentals of Intellectual Property Rights:Perspectives for an Academic SettingCopyright 2012 by CaezarAngelitoEstiokoArceo
  • Fundamentals of Intellectual Property Rights:Perspectives for an Academic SettingCopyright 2012 by CaezarAngelitoEstiokoArceo
  • Fundamentals of Intellectual Property Rights:Perspectives for an Academic SettingCopyright 2012 by CaezarAngelitoEstiokoArceo
  • Fundamentals of Intellectual Property Rights:Perspectives for an Academic SettingCopyright 2012 by CaezarAngelitoEstiokoArceo
  • Fundamentals of Intellectual Property Rights:Perspectives for an Academic SettingCopyright 2012 by CaezarAngelitoEstiokoArceo
  • Fundamentals of Intellectual Property Rights:Perspectives for an Academic SettingCopyright 2012 by CaezarAngelitoEstiokoArceo
  • Fundamentals of Intellectual Property Rights:Perspectives for an Academic SettingCopyright 2012 by CaezarAngelitoEstiokoArceo
  • Fundamentals of Intellectual Property Rights:Perspectives for an Academic SettingCopyright 2012 by CaezarAngelitoEstiokoArceo
  • Fundamentals of Intellectual Property Rights:Perspectives for an Academic SettingCopyright 2012 by CaezarAngelitoEstiokoArceo
  • Fundamentals of Intellectual Property Rights:Perspectives for an Academic SettingCopyright 2012 by CaezarAngelitoEstiokoArceo
  • Fundamentals of Intellectual Property Rights:Perspectives for an Academic SettingCopyright 2012 by CaezarAngelitoEstiokoArceo
  • Fundamentals of Intellectual Property Rights:Perspectives for an Academic SettingCopyright 2012 by CaezarAngelitoEstiokoArceo
  • Fundamentals of Intellectual Property Rights:Perspectives for an Academic SettingCopyright 2012 by CaezarAngelitoEstiokoArceo
  • Fundamentals of Intellectual Property Rights:Perspectives for an Academic SettingCopyright 2012 by CaezarAngelitoEstiokoArceo
  • Fundamentals of Intellectual Property Rights:Perspectives for an Academic SettingCopyright 2012 by CaezarAngelitoEstiokoArceo
  • Fundamentals of Intellectual Property Rights:Perspectives for an Academic SettingCopyright 2012 by CaezarAngelitoEstiokoArceo
  • Fundamentals of Intellectual Property Rights:Perspectives for an Academic SettingCopyright 2012 by CaezarAngelitoEstiokoArceo
  • Fundamentals of Intellectual Property Rights:Perspectives for an Academic SettingCopyright 2012 by CaezarAngelitoEstiokoArceo
  • Fundamentals of Intellectual Property Rights:Perspectives for an Academic SettingCopyright 2012 by CaezarAngelitoEstiokoArceo
  • Fundamentals of Intellectual Property Rights:Perspectives for an Academic SettingCopyright 2012 by CaezarAngelitoEstiokoArceo
  • Fundamentals of Intellectual Property Rights:Perspectives for an Academic SettingCopyright 2012 by CaezarAngelitoEstiokoArceo
  • Fundamentals of Intellectual Property Rights:Perspectives for an Academic SettingCopyright 2012 by CaezarAngelitoEstiokoArceo
  • Fundamentals of Intellectual Property Rights:Perspectives for an Academic SettingCopyright 2012 by CaezarAngelitoEstiokoArceo
  • Fundamentals of Intellectual Property Rights:Perspectives for an Academic SettingCopyright 2012 by CaezarAngelitoEstiokoArceo
  • Fundamentals of Intellectual Property Rights:Perspectives for an Academic SettingCopyright 2012 by CaezarAngelitoEstiokoArceo
  • Fundamentals of Intellectual Property Rights:Perspectives for an Academic SettingCopyright 2012 by CaezarAngelitoEstiokoArceo
  • Fundamentals of Intellectual Property Rights:Perspectives for an Academic SettingCopyright 2012 by CaezarAngelitoEstiokoArceo
  • Fundamentals of Intellectual Property Rights:Perspectives for an Academic SettingCopyright 2012 by CaezarAngelitoEstiokoArceo
  • Fundamentals of Intellectual Property Rights:Perspectives for an Academic SettingCopyright 2012 by CaezarAngelitoEstiokoArceo
  • Fundamentals of Intellectual Property Rights:Perspectives for an Academic SettingCopyright 2012 by CaezarAngelitoEstiokoArceo
  • Fundamentals of Intellectual Property Rights:Perspectives for an Academic SettingCopyright 2012 by CaezarAngelitoEstiokoArceo
  • Fundamentals of Intellectual Property Rights:Perspectives for an Academic SettingCopyright 2012 by CaezarAngelitoEstiokoArceo
  • Fundamentals of Intellectual Property Rights:Perspectives for an Academic SettingCopyright 2012 by CaezarAngelitoEstiokoArceo
  • Fundamentals of Intellectual Property Rights:Perspectives for an Academic SettingCopyright 2012 by CaezarAngelitoEstiokoArceo
  • Fundamentals of Intellectual Property Rights:Perspectives for an Academic SettingCopyright 2012 by CaezarAngelitoEstiokoArceo
  • Fundamentals of Intellectual Property Rights:Perspectives for an Academic SettingCopyright 2012 by CaezarAngelitoEstiokoArceo
  • Fundamentals of Intellectual Property Rights:Perspectives for an Academic SettingCopyright 2012 by CaezarAngelitoEstiokoArceo
  • Fundamentals of Intellectual Property Rights:Perspectives for an Academic SettingCopyright 2012 by CaezarAngelitoEstiokoArceo
  • Fundamentals of Intellectual Property Rights:Perspectives for an Academic SettingCopyright 2012 by CaezarAngelitoEstiokoArceo
  • Fundamentals of Intellectual Property Rights:Perspectives for an Academic SettingCopyright 2012 by CaezarAngelitoEstiokoArceo
  • Fundamentals of Intellectual Property Rights:Perspectives for an Academic SettingCopyright 2012 by CaezarAngelitoEstiokoArceo
  • Fundamentals of Intellectual Property Rights:Perspectives for an Academic SettingCopyright 2012 by CaezarAngelitoEstiokoArceo
  • Fundamentals of Intellectual Property Rights:Perspectives for an Academic SettingCopyright 2012 by CaezarAngelitoEstiokoArceo
  • Fundamentals of Intellectual Property Rights (IPRs): Perspectives for an Academic Setting

    1. 1. Fundamentals of Intellectual Property Rights (IPRs):Perspectives for an Academic SettingCaezar Angelito Estioko ArceoProud VMUF Alumnus9th Martin M. Posadas Memorial Research ForumVirgen Milagrosa University FoundationSan Carlos City, Pangasinan23 February 2012
    2. 2. Ideas… Ideas… Ideas… © 2005 by CAE Arceo First used for the Philippine Rice Research Institute
    3. 3. Our basic questions1. What is an IPR?2. Why is there a need for IPRs?3. What can be protected as an IPR?4. How can IPRs be protected?5. What is in store for VMUF?
    4. 4. Question No. 1What is an IPR?
    5. 5. 1. What is an IPR? 1.1 It is a right.  Property rights which result from the physical manifestation of original thought 1.2 It is a property. “Ownership of property is acquired by occupation or by intellectual creation.” -Civil Code of the -Philippines (RA 386) Beronio et al., 2008.
    6. 6. Question No. 2Why is there a need for IPRs?
    7. 7. 2. Why is there a need for IPRs? 2.1 Because you have something new and useful. INVENTOR INVENTION(S) Johnson Fong Carbonless paper (PH18978, 11- 27-1985) Virgilio Ecarma Cure for asthma, arthritis, bladder stone, etc (US2005042313; ZA200306583; ZA200306581; PH30978) Bonifacio Transporting fish by making it Comandante “sleep” (WO2005039280) Videoke (Roberto del Rosario)
    8. 8. 2. Why is there a need for IPRs? 2.1 Because you have something new and useful.
    9. 9. 2. Why is there a need for IPRs? © 2007 by CAE Arceo Claim Drafting Training for BPRE 2.1 Because you have something new and useful. Primeau and Casad, 1905; US Patent No. 795048. …which does not necessarily need to be grandiose!
    10. 10. 2. Why is there a need for IPRs? © 2007 by CAE Arceo Claim Drafting Training for PCARRD 2.1 Because you have something new and useful. Cheng, 2006 Santos, 2004 Crow, 1924 Hubeny & Frahm, 1924 Griffiths, 1927 Sharpe, 2006 Hammer, 1957 Cabili, 1996 Froehlich and Froehlich, 1994 Lorber, 1972 THE PAPER CLIP FAMILY …which does not necessarily need to be grandiose! Botsford, 1973
    11. 11. 2. Why is there a need for IPRs? 2.2 Because no one wants frustration.
    12. 12. 2. Why is there a need for IPRs? 2.2 Because no one wants frustration. “Armalite” (Armando Lite) Apollo lunar rover (Agapito San Juan) Nata de coco (Teodula Afrika) Some in the Antibiotic loooooooong list of (Abelardo Aguilar) Filipino “claims”
    13. 13. 2. Why is there a need for IPRs? 2.2 Because no one wants frustration. Some in the loooooooong list of Filipino “claims”
    14. 14. 2. Why is there a need for IPRs? 2.2 Because no one wants frustration. IRRI-PhilRice’s Leaf color chart THEN NOW
    15. 15. 2. Why is there a need for IPRs? 2.3 Because the law says so. “The State shall protect and secure the exclusive rights of scientists, inventors, artists, and other gifted citizens to their intellectual property and creations, particularly when beneficial to the people, for such period as may be provided by law.” Article XIV, Section 13 1987 Constitution
    16. 16. 2. Why is there a need for IPRs? “(T)o give priority to invention and its utilization on the country’s productive systems and 2.3 Because the law says so. national life… and provide incentives to inventors, and “The State xxx shall protect and protect their exclusive rights to secure the exclusive rights of their invention, particularly when scientists, inventors, artists and other the invention is beneficial to the gifted citizens to their intellectual people and contributes to national property and creations, particularly development and progress…” when beneficial to the people, for such periods as provided in this Act.” Section 2, RA 7459 Section 2, RA 8293 (Inventor and Invention Incentives Act) “The state xxx shall protect and secure the exclusive rights of breeders with respect to their new plant variety particularly when beneficial to the people for such period as provided for this Act.” Section 2(a), Republic Act No. 9168 (Plant Variety Protection Act of 2002)
    17. 17. 2. Why is there a need for IPRs? 2.3 Because the law says so. Some International Treaties that cover IPRs  Patent Cooperation Treaty (since 2001)  Convention on Biological Diversity (since 1995)  Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS Agreement) (since 1995)  Rome Convention on Performers, Phonograms and Broadcasting Organizations (since 1984)  Budapest Treaty on Deposit of Microorganisms (since 1981)  Convention Establishing the World Intellectual Property Organization (since 1980)  Paris Convention on Industrial Property (since 1965)  Berne Convention on Literary and Artistic Works (since 1951)  International Union for the Protection of New Varieties of Plants (UPOV)  Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety  International Undertaking for Food and Agriculture
    18. 18. 2. Why is there a need for IPRs? 2.3 Because the law says so. GATT-IPR System WIPO TRIPS Convention IP Code GATT- PCTPatent Paris Budapest TRIPS IP Code RA 165System Convention Treaty “Seed CBD Treaty” Berne PD 49, as GATT-Copyright Rome TRIPS IP Code Convention amended bySystem Convention PD No. 1988 Trademark GATT- systemTrademark during the RA 166 TRIPS IP CodeSystem Spanish regime Post IP 1888 1947 1951 1965 1972 1980 1981 1984 1995 1997 Code © 2006 by Atty. Ronilo A. Beronio
    19. 19. 2. Why is there a need for IPRs? 2.4 Because you want an edge. “Zombie cockroach”
    20. 20. Question No. 3What can be protected as an IPR?
    21. 21. 3. What can be protected as an IPR?  The easiest IPR to protect.  Obtained at the time of creation.  Covers all forms of3.1 Copyright. literary, scholarly, scientific, and artistic creations.  Includes literary and derivative works.  Protection during the lifetime of the author and 50 years after his death
    22. 22. 3. What can be protected as an IPR? EXCLUSIONS:3.2 Patents. “It is an exclusive right granted for a (1) Discoveries, scientifi c theories and product, process or an mathematical “A Patent is a grant improvement of a product methods;issued by the government or process which is (2) Mentalthrough the Intellectual new, inventive and useful.” acts, games, busine ss models, computerProperty Office of the programs;Philippines (IP Philippines).” (3) Surgery, therapy or diagnostic methods on the human or “A patent has a term of protection of twenty (20) animal body.; years providing an inventor significant commercial gain.” (4) Plant varieties or animal breeds or Source: http://ipophil.gov.ph/ essentially biological process for the production of plants or animals. (5) Aesthetic creations; “A patent is a contract between and the government and the inventor.” (6) Anything which is contrary to public order or morality. - Sec. 22, RA 8293 - Dr. Karl Rackette
    23. 23. 3. What can be protected as an IPR?3.2 Patents. Novelty 1 Inventive step An invention shall not be 2 considered new if it forms part of a prior art. An invention involves an inventive step if, having - Sec. 23, RA 8293 regard to prior art, it is not obvious to a person skilled in 3 Industrial the art at the time of the filing date or priority date of the application claiming the applicability invention - Sec. 26, RA 8293 An invention that can be produced and used in any industry shall be industrially applicable. - Sec. 27, RA 8293
    24. 24. 3. What can be protected as an IPR?3.3 Utility Models. Novelty 1 Inventive step An invention shall not be 2 considered new if it forms part of a prior art. An invention involves an inventive step if, having - Sec. 23, RA 8293 regard to prior art, it is not obvious to a person skilled in 3 Industrial the art at the time of the filing date or priority date of the application claiming the applicability invention - Sec. 26, RA 8293 An invention that can be produced and used in any industry shall be industrially applicable.  “Petty patent”.  Protected for seven (7) years. - Sec. 27, RA 8293
    25. 25. 3. What can be protected as an IPR?3.4 Industrial Designs Protects the aesthetic design of the product.
    26. 26. 3. What can be protected as an IPR?Patents vs. Utility Models vs. Industrial Designs:Original designVersion 1 Version 2Version 3Version 4Please check your pencil
    27. 27. 3. What can be protected as an IPR?3.5 Trademarks. Protects brands. Comprises words, marks, symbols, or any of their combination. Class-specific protection.
    28. 28. 3. What can be protected as an IPR? Trade secrets3.6 Other IPRs. Plant Varieties Geographical indications “Basi” “Carabao mango” “Manila paper” Layout designs Domain names - Protected by RA 9150
    29. 29. Question No. 4How can IPRs be protected?
    30. 30. 4. How can IPRs be protected?4.1 Strategize. Who are potential competitors? Is this applicable in an industry/ market? What is the extent of applicability? Where can we find our What could be the potential competitors? future technology landscape?
    31. 31. 4. How can IPRs be protected?4.2 Always keep in mind: The “First-to-File” Rule. First to File Rule. - If two (2) or more persons have made the invention separately and independently of each other, the right to the patent shall belong to the person who filed an application for such invention, or where two or more applications are filed for the same invention, to the applicant who has the earliest filing date or, the earliest priority date. - Sec. 29, RA 8293 “If two (2) or more persons develop a new plant variety separately and independently of each other, the Certificate of Plant Variety Protection shall belong to the person who files the application first.” Section 20 , RA 9168
    32. 32. 4. How can IPRs be protected?4.3 Institutionalize an “IP Policy”. Inspiration: Definition of “Technology Transfer” “Contracts or agreements involving the transfer of systematic knowledge for the manufacture of a product, the application of a process, or rendering of a service including management contracts; and the transfer, assignment, or licensing of all forms of IPRs including licensing of computer softwares except computer softwares developed for mass markets.” Section 4.2, RA 8293
    33. 33. 4. How can IPRs be protected?4.3 Institutionalize an “IP Policy”.Default terms of IPR ownership (RA 8293)Type of IPR Employer EmployeePatent If part of employee’s regular If not part of regular duties,Utility model duties, unless there is an even if employee uses theIndustrial design agreement, express or time, facilities, andIntegrated circuit implied, to the contrary. materials of the employer.Layout designCopyright If part of employee’s regular If not part of regular duties; duties, unless there is an however, works of agreement, express or government employees are implied, to the contrary. not copyrightable.Plant varieties or plant If resulting from the If there is a writtenbreeders’ right performance of regular stipulation allowing the duties, unless there is a employee to own the plant written stipulation to the variety even if it is part of contrary. regular duties.
    34. 34. 4. How can IPRs be protected?4.3 Institutionalize an “IP Policy”.Usual contents of an IP Policy: University IPR ownership Incentive and incentive system for IPR Covered IPRs and required undertakings Non-disclosure terms Who are covered and their obligations An IP Policy Statement
    35. 35. 4. How can IPRs be protected?4.3 Institutionalize an “IP Policy”.Sample invention disclosure process flow (Singapore model) Inventor Prior art inputs Invention Commercial search 2-4 weeks disclosure assessment No relevant Close prior Low commercial Abandon prior art art potential Can be Freedom designed to operate around No relevant prior art Drafting and filing
    36. 36. 4. How can IPRs be protected?4.4 Sustain the gains.
    37. 37. Question No. 5What is in store for VMUF?
    38. 38. 5. What are in store for VMUF? 5.1 IPRs as leverage.
    39. 39. 5. What are in store for VMUF? © 2007 by CAE Arceo Claim Drafting Training for PCARRD 5.1 IPRs as leverage. Inventor’s wish Patent Examiner Trial court Patent Agent $$$$ PATENT CLAIMS Infringers “Future” Market Competitors
    40. 40. 5. What are in store for VMUF? 5.2 Some university models.
    41. 41. 5. What are in store for VMUF? 5.2 Some university models.
    42. 42. 5. What are in store for VMUF? 5.2 Some university models.
    43. 43. 5. What are in store for VMUF? 5.3 Exploration of a network. http://www.ipophil.gov.ph
    44. 44. 5. What are in store for VMUF? 5.4 Streamlining R&D and commercialization efforts. Faculty and student initiatives University R&D University IP Office Other university arms Public Affairs Rewards/Incentives R&D proposals Prior art search Community/Client Inputs Publication Technology R&D clearance Transfer system Agreements Commercialization R&D internal funding IPR registration Tech Maturity/ Extension Outputs Review & Monitoring Refinement R&D external funding External Linkages
    45. 45. An invitation from the oldest research council in Asia… University researchers to become members and to access our research grant, and Masters thesis and Ph.D. dissertation students for our meager thesis grant. Please visit http://nrcp.dost.gov.ph
    46. 46. Question No. 6Do you have any question?…and thank you! © 2012 by Caezar Angelito Estioko Arceo Registered Patent Agent in the Philippines (Non-chemical field, 2006; Chemical, 2007) Mentor, Patent Agent Qualifying Examinations 2011 cangear@yahoo.com http://www.youtube.com/cangear http://www.twitter.com/cangear http://www.slideshare.net/cangear http://www.scribd.com/cangear
    47. 47. Creditshttp://wipo.int/amc/en/domains/Photo SourceArmalite http://www.policemag.com/Channel/Weapons/News/2010/04/29/ArmaLit e-Introduces-SPR-Mod-1-Rifle.aspxApollo Lunar Rover http://nssdc.gsfc.nasa.gov/planetary/lunar/apollo_lrv.htmlVideoke http://georgedelapaz.blogspot.com/2012/01/videoke-blues.htmlAgapito Flores http://inventors.about.com/od/filipinoscientists/a/Agapito_Flores.htmFluorescent lamp http://americanlightingandchemicals.com/long_life_lamps.htmlNata de coco http://www.thefilipinoentrepreneur.com/2008/04/03/how-to-make-nata- de-coco.htmAntibiotic http://www.shopyourmeds.com/antibiotics/buy-erythromycinIntegrated circuit http://ee.uwa.edu.auMoney inventor http://www.toonpool.com/cartoons/caveman%20wife%20money%20invention_11 3801Pen holders http://www.thinkgeek.com/clearance/on-sale/d1ef/ http://www.made-in-china.com/showroom/candyl89/offer- detailpQxEnlYyomcW/Sell-Acrylic-Pen-Holder.html http://www.chinawholesalegift.com/7/acrylic-pen-holder/ http://oker88.en.made-in-china.com/offer/HbaQxikDuIcm/Sell-Pen-Holder-Pencil- Holder-Plastic-Holder-Hedgehog-Pencil-Holder-Injection-Mold-Blow-Mold- Rubber-Mold-Plastic-Mold-Molding-Tooling.html
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